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Puberty before 10: a new normal?

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http://www.nytimes.com/2012/04/01/magazine...?pagewanted=all

 

It's not a particularly long read, but it is seven pages so I'm not going to copypasta.

 

I figure there are enough parents (and teachers!) on here to find this interesting, tho' I expect that the stats for when puberty starts will differ from country to country.

 

The tldr version of the article is that puberty seems to be starting younger and younger in female children, and the line between 'normal', 'normal outlier', and 'precocious puberty' is becoming more and more blurred. Part of the blame is being placed on xeno/phyto-oestrogens, environmental triggers that may come from agricultural products and plastics, as well as some food sources like soy that are naturally high in such compounds, that raise oestrogen levels without pituitary/ovary involvement. Similarly, childhood obesity is suspected of being a culprit, with adipose tissue increasing oestrogen production. Some of the angst seems to be at what defines puberty, too: if puberty only technically starts when a chain reaction of hormones are released within the body, starting in the brain, then are things we typically associate with puberty - breast development, pubic/body hair growth - necessarily only caused by the onset of puberty? In some cases, the answer seems to be no. In these cases, at least, it seems that the brain may not be transitioning to adolescence, despite how the child's body may look. Pubic hair development and breast budding may occur early for some girls, but menstruation is not happening much earlier. At least according to averages.

 

Another issue to be juggled is whether it should be accepted, or a treatment regime should be implemented - and if implemented, should it be limited to exercise, a natural puberty blocker, or should hormonal treatment be considered?

 

The conclusion of the article seems to be that, whatever happens, a supportive and loving family environment will go a long way to making life easier for everyone involved, especially the child, whether it is real or fake puberty.

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I saw a theory a while ago claiming that this effect was being caused by increased devorce rates. The research alleged that young girls spending extended amounts of time with a non-family male would develop earlier.

 

No idea if its horse shit or not.

 

As for the plastics theory, the same thing is being blamed for the consistent drop in sperm counts in the global male population over the least half-century or so.

 

*shrug*

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Family makeup - whether there was a father around, whether there was a step father around, whether it was a single parent, etc, were mentioned in the article. I was a little surprised that there was no comment on how this plays out for same sex couples/families. I wasn't too sure if it was trying to raise it in the context of different instigators of stress, or something else.

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Dumping soduim flurosilicate into the water supply was another factor, apparently it calcifies certain parts of the brain that are responsible for regulating those kinds of development things.

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Another issue to be juggled is whether it should be accepted, or a treatment regime should be implemented - and if implemented, should it be limited to exercise, a natural puberty blocker, or should hormonal treatment be considered?

 

The conclusion of the article seems to be that, whatever happens, a supportive and loving family environment will go a long way to making life easier for everyone involved, especially the child, whether it is real or fake puberty.

Should we treat the short? What about the redheads? I don't understand why there aren't more support networks in place.

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Another issue to be juggled is whether it should be accepted, or a treatment regime should be implemented - and if implemented, should it be limited to exercise, a natural puberty blocker, or should hormonal treatment be considered?

 

The conclusion of the article seems to be that, whatever happens, a supportive and loving family environment will go a long way to making life easier for everyone involved, especially the child, whether it is real or fake puberty.

Should we treat the short? What about the redheads? I don't understand why there aren't more support networks in place.

 

The difference in this case is that we don't sexualise short redheads.

Considering the growing sexualisation a children, having kids growup and have more exposure to this by falling into the target demographic without being mentally ready for it is a very big concern.

 

Do you really want to see bras marketed to 10 year olds?

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Another issue to be juggled is whether it should be accepted, or a treatment regime should be implemented - and if implemented, should it be limited to exercise, a natural puberty blocker, or should hormonal treatment be considered?

 

The conclusion of the article seems to be that, whatever happens, a supportive and loving family environment will go a long way to making life easier for everyone involved, especially the child, whether it is real or fake puberty.

Should we treat the short? What about the redheads? I don't understand why there aren't more support networks in place.

 

Definitely the redheads.

 

And I'm all for support networks for parents of redheads.

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Why is this news? Hormone-mimics have been known about as a pernicious pollutant for over a decade. These chemicals were first noticed for over-abundance of female alligators in Florida - that same effect has since been seen in human populations all over the planet. If estrogen-mimics can select for gender in zygotes, and over-production of natural estrogen can bring on early-onset puberty, then why is a mimic doing the same a surprise to anyone?

 

No kidding, every 5-10 years some media outlet 'breaks' 'new research' about something that has been around for quite a while. I first noticed it in 1985, but I'm sure it's been going on longer than that. I wouldn't be too surprised to read about 'researchers' discovering a mysterious attractive force, apparently caused by mass! :P

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I wouldn't be too surprised to read about 'researchers' discovering a mysterious attractive force, apparently caused by mass! :P

Leave my dick out of this.

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Why is this news? If estrogen-mimics can select for gender in zygotes, and over-production of natural estrogen can bring on early-onset puberty, then why is a mimic doing the same a surprise to anyone?

 

No kidding, every 5-10 years some media outlet 'breaks' 'new research' about something that has been around for quite a while. I first noticed it in 1985, but I'm sure it's been going on longer than that.

At a guess, because parents of such children are still panicking and being upset.

 

 

Considering the growing sexualisation a children, having kids growup and have more exposure to this by falling into the target demographic without being mentally ready for it is a very big concern.

 

Do you really want to see bras marketed to 10 year olds?

I don't follow. Are bras for young teens generally marketed in a highly sexualised manner?

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Another issue to be juggled is whether it should be accepted, or a treatment regime should be implemented - and if implemented, should it be limited to exercise, a natural puberty blocker, or should hormonal treatment be considered?

I don't see why early puberty shouldn't be accepted, after all, there's no forgone conclusion as to it's occurrence. And since it's possibly a forgone conclusion that the human race will not wipe out any, and all synthetic manufacturing,

the only thing to do is to accept that a child may hit puberty earlier than first assumed.

Giving the child the healthiest diet that's possible for the family to provide along with the means to play and exercise as kids usually are wont to do, and of course the security of a loving family, will make for a well adjusted person.

 

Tracee is well on the way to creating a monster of Ainsley. granted, her ( Tracee ) intentions may be founded on her desire to 'help' her daughter, and of course, as a mother to understand ... but I can't help but wish that she'd

not dragged the daughter off to the doctor to find out what was wrong with her, quite so many times.

 

In that link, it mentioned the early onset of puberty having some relation to breast cancer in later life. I can't help wondering if all man's wondrous inventions ( and they are wondrous ), have the ultimate Achilles Heel .

With the help of modern medicine, we generally are living longer...

I think the human body is evolving with our inventions ;)

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Another issue to be juggled is whether it should be accepted, or a treatment regime should be implemented - and if implemented, should it be limited to exercise, a natural puberty blocker, or should hormonal treatment be considered?

 

The conclusion of the article seems to be that, whatever happens, a supportive and loving family environment will go a long way to making life easier for everyone involved, especially the child, whether it is real or fake puberty.

Should we treat the short? What about the redheads? I don't understand why there aren't more support networks in place.

 

The difference in this case is that we don't sexualise short redheads.

Considering the growing sexualisation a children, having kids growup and have more exposure to this by falling into the target demographic without being mentally ready for it is a very big concern.

 

Do you really want to see bras marketed to 10 year olds?

 

Dude. Training bras. It's already there.

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Another issue to be juggled is whether it should be accepted, or a treatment regime should be implemented - and if implemented, should it be limited to exercise, a natural puberty blocker, or should hormonal treatment be considered?

 

The conclusion of the article seems to be that, whatever happens, a supportive and loving family environment will go a long way to making life easier for everyone involved, especially the child, whether it is real or fake puberty.

Should we treat the short? What about the redheads? I don't understand why there aren't more support networks in place.

 

The difference in this case is that we don't sexualise short redheads.

Considering the growing sexualisation a children, having kids growup and have more exposure to this by falling into the target demographic without being mentally ready for it is a very big concern.

 

Do you really want to see bras marketed to 10 year olds?

 

I think we sexualise tall, young girls a lot.

 

Many models are hitting it big between 10-13.

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Should we treat the short? What about the redheads? I don't understand why there aren't more support networks in place.

Because there's just no hope for rangas.

 

Do you really want to see more bras marketed to 10 year olds?

FTFY

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The difference in this case is that we don't sexualise short redheads.

My god man ! What is wrong with you ?

 

;{D

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It's not just training bras, have you seen the miniskirts and midriff tops marketed to girls in the 10-12 bracket?

My 11 year old sister dresses like more of a slut than most year 11 girls.

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It's not just training bras, have you seen the miniskirts and midriff tops marketed to girls in the 10-12 bracket?

My 11 year old sister dresses like more of a slut than most year 11 girls.

 

Aren't you attaching those values to it yourself?

 

I don't see short clothes like that.. unless it has something like "skank" written on it in glitter or something.

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Research into what is causing it is a good thing.

 

At the end of the day, I must agree with eveln, a person who is brought up to be mentally strong and emotionally stable doesn't develop mental health issues regardless of how early they enter into puberty. It would seem many of these parents are creating the issue and quite probably making it worse.

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It's not just training bras, have you seen the miniskirts and midriff tops marketed to girls in the 10-12 bracket?

My 11 year old sister dresses like more of a slut than most year 11 girls.

Oh god I can see her stomach, what a fucking whore!

 

 

Aren't you attaching those values to it yourself?

 

I don't see short clothes like that.. unless it has something like "skank" written on it in glitter or something.

+1

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I blame early Puberty on the Growth Hormones they feed chickens and then we eat the eggs they produce.

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One of my friends is a model at the age of 14 :/

 

Also Maybe it is just the human race evolving or some other other external factor, but I really do not care. If the brain thinks it's a good time to start making those chemicals then maybe we should listen to. If the kid is in a good environment it'll be fine.

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Yeah but ( as annoying as that expression is, I love it :P ) ...

 

It's not evolution though, is it ? We're possibly being quite affected by our man made inventions, but it's not changing our DNA :) ... so far :P

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It'd have an affect on the so called DNA memory which can pass on in a single generation, or whatever the effect is called, that influences from one to the next.

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I blame early Puberty on the Growth Hormones they feed chickens and then we eat the eggs they produce.

That's a lot of chickens that'd need to be hormone'd up.

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