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11 hours ago, Rybags said:

Trying to sell a Wifi range extender?

 

Instead of telling the truth, just create a conspiracy theory about ISPs throttling you back progressively using your own modem then tell them a 300 mbps device will miraculously restore what you're paying for.

https://wifiblastshop.com/tech/wifi-au.php?affId=DA2379F6&c1=au&c2=comp_fmun_un_adgroup2_res&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI7Ij05-XC4wIVDq-OCh2oWgcZEAEYASAAEgJd0_D_BwE

 

Wow. And all contained in that tiny plug in device. 

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3 hours ago, fliptopia said:

 

Wow. And all contained in that tiny plug in device. 

 

but the intensity of radiation has fused my alfoil beanie to my remaining hair

 

guess it's an added bonus to make me a silver fox ?

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17 minutes ago, scruffy1 said:

 

but the intensity of radiation has fused my alfoil beanie to my remaining hair

 

guess it's an added bonus to make me a silver fox ?

 

Like the equivalent of a permanency spell in pathfinder / d&d

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Probably needs to go in gaming but not necessarily deserving of an entire thread.

 

The classic game "Another World" was actually written as bytecode and the PC version used a 20K virtual machine interpreter.  This allowed easy porting to other systems where the bytecode and game assets could be left untouched and all that was needed was a rewrite of the VM to cater for the relevant hardware.

 

Such is the game's status that despite no publicised source being available, the PC version was reverse-engineered and put onto GitHub.

 

https://github.com/fabiensanglard/Another-World-Bytecode-Interpreter

 

Code review and internals description:  https://fabiensanglard.net/anotherWorld_code_review/

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Posted (edited)

Getting stuff out of Japan is just slow! Apparently 15 days just for customs ... geez

it's screwdriver set, nothing special.

Edited by Jeruselem

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Posted (edited)

Now that depends J. Some years ago now I bought a set of precision screwdrivers in Akihabara. They didn't LOOK anything particularly special, nicer case than usual but when I took a closer look they were anything but the typical two buck specials, chrome vanadium steel, zero slop, absolutely beautifully made.

 

They set me back the yen equivalent of thirty bucks but I've never regretted it. The sales spiel was that they were actually made by a semi-retired katana maker.  doubt it, but you never know 🙂

 

The Japanese do take their tools seriously and there is no better place to find them than in Akihabara.

 

Cheers

 

 

Edited by chrisg

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, chrisg said:

Now that depends J. Some years ago now I bought a set of precision screwdrivers in Akihabara. They didn't LOOK anything particularly special, nicer case than usual but when I took a closer look they were anything but the typical two buck specials, chrome vanadium steel, zero slop, absolutely beautifully made.

 

They set me back the yen equivalent of thirty bucks but I've never regretted it. The sales spiel was that they were actually made by a semi-retired katana maker.  doubt it, but you never know 🙂

 

The Japanese do take their tools seriously and there is no better place to find them than in Akihabara.

 

Cheers

 

 

 

Yep this set was vanadium steel too. No one of that Chinese alloy crap for me! No I don't expect a Katana maker to make these LOL

Edited by Jeruselem

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have to agree

 

i have the Engineer Inc PAD-01 Open Barrel Handy Crimping Tool Set, and an olaf cutter from japanese stock, and they are both exquisite tools for little aeroplane stuff

 

a crimper that does 1mm spaced pins is a great (tiny) thing

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And our NAS just killed itself. It's one of those with the faulty Intel C2000 atom CPUs.

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That's a bit of a bugger J, are you going to be able to move the drives somewhere else whilst it gets fixed ?

 

Yeah scruffy, I have a couple of precision cutters that I also bought in Aki, things of beauty to work with but purely for precision work, for heavy duty stuff my Klein's are fine (I think I have far too many tools but doesn't stop me from poring over every tool catalogue that comes my way 🙂 )

 

Cheers

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17 minutes ago, chrisg said:

That's a bit of a bugger J, are you going to be able to move the drives somewhere else whilst it gets fixed ?

 

 

Raised support with Synology, we are willing to pay for data recovery. Plan B is a PC with lots of SATA ports and copy of Ubuntu ...

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🙂

 

Well, if you don't have a backup of your NAS I guess plan A has to be given a go, if you do then plan B has merit 🙂

 

Ubuntu has no problem supporting lots of drives   🙂

 

The drive mapping... that can be a bit of a challenge  🙂

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

 

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Well the issue is most computers in the office don't have 8 SATA ports!

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🙂

 

It is rather a lot for a typical desktop machine   🙂

 

Cheers

 

 

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Heh.

 

I'll make a prediction, he won't last long.

 

Cheers

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On 7/23/2019 at 11:08 AM, scruffy1 said:

...and an olaf cutter from japanese stock...

 

Olaf from Frozen, right?

 

IYuIo4k.jpg

 

or maybe its more like this :P

UlqlguD.jpg

  • Haha 2

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So which pretentious BOURKE is gonna pay SIX HUNDRED THOUSAND DOLLARS for a frigging pair of Nike sand shoes ???  ... ffs!

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*Phew!!!*

 

Had me a little concerned until I saw the 50gms and above comment.

 

Much as I love chilli that is way, way more than I'd eat in an average week let alone day.

 

I'm curious though, it makes no mention of the strength of the chilli. On the scoville scale I tend towards those in the 25 to 70,000 units, regarded as pretty hot, although no where near Ghost territory so I guess I don't need as much to give that delicious spicy taste.

 

Does that make a difference? The study seems not to address that.

 

I've a Chinese friend who literally eats whole chillis as a side dish, pretty hot jalapenos as well, then tucks into a variety of spicy food. He would not fit the curve, he's in his sixties, somewhat over-weight and sharp as a tack.

 

Cheers

 

 

 

 

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On 20/07/2019 at 11:21 AM, chrisg said:

It SHOULD be FTTP everywhere but going to take a while.

 

We could have had it two decades ago, instead we still in the main exist on decrepit copper.

The only way I'd get fibre if, after all the power infrastructure was burnt to the ground, they told people to go without power for even longer while the rebuild included laying fibre in the underground power ducting.

I don't see that as having been a serious political reality.

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Posted (edited)

Hmm.

 

The thing is that the Telstra group I met with, decades ago, were simply going to do it by stealth, and well within the annual maintenance budget.

 

Their plan was to pitch to  have fibre taken to the nodes, which it pretty much is now, and then after a quiet assessment of the copper distribution out from each node simply use it to pull in fibre the rest of the way. the only things stopping them were the then rather high cost of fibre end user termination, which has improved, a bit, and the then prevailing USO. They had not worked out how to run a phone over fibre if the power went down.

 

(Actually they had, via battery but apparently that did not meet the USO requirement.)

 

Well, the USO died with the beginning of the roll-out of the NBN and the first item is all about economy of scale, if you have a big enough requirement for end user fibre kit the prices, in particular of avalanche cascade photodiodes crash.

 

They'd actually done the math, Australia is not exactly a massive market but big enough that if they had have been allowed to go ahead, the diode cost on guaranteed forward orders could have been driven down below $5 and a total fibre converter cost below $200. If you remember what modems cost back then you were suddenly in the same ball-park pricing.

 

All much to reasonable for a succession of governments and then Telstra deregulated and that was the end of it.

 

I actually met with one of that visionary team a few years back. He'd taken a very lucrative separation package from Telstra such that he did not to really work again but he didn't like the idea of retirement much so he was working, in fibre optics, for a distributor. He was still crying in his beer over the lost opportunity...

 

We should have fought harder I guess but it all made so much sense that we forgot how senseless governments can be.

 

Cheers

 

 

Edited by chrisg

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What counts as a node in a rural area?  My nearest 'node' is the subexchange ~4km away.  GL pulling fibre through that mess.

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