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p0is0n

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Thanks guys. Advice is appreciated. I went to a shop on Saturday when I was out and checked out a few knives. The Globals were about 1/3 the weight of most others, but felt quite effortless to use. The store wasn't flexible on price, looking for over $150 for a 20cm chef's knife so I will be buying online. They did have some other nice knives too but Global just has too many votes to ignore, can't argue with the numbers, so will get one of those.

 

The site tantryl linked above is dirt cheap, about $77 or around half the price of the store but their minimum shipping cost is $20. I found another site with the same prices and more reasonable shipping, called Kitchenware Superstore so will probably order from them.

 

Thanks again for the input everyone. :)

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yourhomedepot has free shipping on quite a lot of things including the two I linked and all Global sets that include blocks. *shrug*

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yourhomedepot has free shipping on quite a lot of things including the two I linked and all Global sets that include blocks. *shrug*

Wow I am pretty sure their offer was free shipping on $150+ just Saturday, now seems to be $100 so might be the best deal, thanks :)

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I'll chuck another vote in for global, they come from factory real bloody sharp and it was an absolute revelation to me when I first used them. the small paring knife has decided to get a spot of rust on it recently unfortunately but they've been otherwise good to me for a couple of years now.

The 3 inch paring knife? I have a spot of rust on mine too. The blade on it doesn't seem to be the same as the larger ones, and doesn't hold an edge as well.

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Late DOWN vote for Globals.

 

At end of day, for Globals you MUST get a steel and consider getting a diamond stone ASAP. LEARN TO SHARPEN. Don't just flail around with the steel. You'll make the situation worse. Lots of videos for it out there. Even quite a few decent ones.

 

Globals have a soft steel in them. This allows them to get a fantastic edge easily. But it means it's easy to LOSE the edge quickly. Further, because it is a soft steel, it means improper sharpening just damages the knife faster.

 

Got Globals. In hindsight, I wish we didn't. I'd prefer to get a harder steel (Mundials) and put the edge on every few months and then hone daily.

 

Globals, I'm finding I have to sharpen every 2 weeks and hone daily.

 

Sharp yes, IF you maintain it. And don't even THINK about chopping with them. You just feather the edge. These are slicing knives.

 

And here ends the rant of:

AD

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:)

 

Knew you would have an informed opinion AD.

 

I can'y argue either, the Mundials go a lot longer between sharpening than the Globals but I tend to hone a knife before I use it most times anyway.

 

Cheers

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Late DOWN vote for Globals.

 

At end of day, for Globals you MUST get a steel and consider getting a diamond stone ASAP. LEARN TO SHARPEN. Don't just flail around with the steel. You'll make the situation worse. Lots of videos for it out there. Even quite a few decent ones.

 

Globals have a soft steel in them. This allows them to get a fantastic edge easily. But it means it's easy to LOSE the edge quickly. Further, because it is a soft steel, it means improper sharpening just damages the knife faster.

 

Got Globals. In hindsight, I wish we didn't. I'd prefer to get a harder steel (Mundials) and put the edge on every few months and then hone daily.

 

Globals, I'm finding I have to sharpen every 2 weeks and hone daily.

 

Sharp yes, IF you maintain it. And don't even THINK about chopping with them. You just feather the edge. These are slicing knives.

 

And here ends the rant of:

AD

Precisely

 

Globals are like lightsabers when you first get them.

Then they are a complete asshole.

 

Gotta learn to sharpen and invest in proper training

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Sharpening is something I know very little about, I have a rough idea of the proper technique but little practise.. my current knives can vouch for this.

I was planning on getting a deal that includes a sharpening tool.. no idea if it is any good but it looks easy to use.

 

Posted Image

Edited by p0is0n

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I'll chuck another vote in for global, they come from factory real bloody sharp and it was an absolute revelation to me when I first used them. the small paring knife has decided to get a spot of rust on it recently unfortunately but they've been otherwise good to me for a couple of years now.

The 3 inch paring knife? I have a spot of rust on mine too. The blade on it doesn't seem to be the same as the larger ones, and doesn't hold an edge as well.

 

Yeah thats the one. It is a little dissapointing but I don't often use that knife.

 

I'll have to follow AD's advice and check if I'm sharpening them properly to make sure I get the best life out of them. So far they have been going good though. I've been using a ceramic sharpener for the knives, I think that is what was recommended in the owner's manual.

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Sharpening is something I know very little about, I have a rough idea of the proper technique but little practise.. my current knives can vouch for this.

I was planning on getting a deal that includes a sharpening tool.. no idea if it is any good but it looks easy to use.

 

Posted Image

Honestly, sharpeners like that will keep somewhat of an edge on your knife, but it will never keep it in A1 condition, plus you learn nothing using them. Better to get a stone and a good steal and learn to do it yourself. If you fuck up you can always go pay to have an edge put back on it.

 

Now as far as knives go I too say fuck Global. Everything AccessDenied said is spot on. These are going to be your first knives so you want something that's utilitarian, by that I mean a knife or knives that are easy to keep an edge and easy to sharpen. Also, don't go spending $200 on your first 'good' knife.

 

My advice is go buy a couple of Victronox knives. http://www.victorinox.com/ch/category/Cate...&m=add& They are a great first knife. Hard steel that keeps it's edge, comfortable handles and a great price. You could get 4 good knives for the price of one Global. Use those for a couple of years and learn to sharpen them in that time.

 

Once you have had those for a while then think about investing in a great knife, like one of these http://www.chefsarmoury.com/kitchen-knives...ji/cat_198.html

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Wheel sharpeners like that are also a great way to rip the living shit out of your knife: just press a bit hard as you draw back, and you can watch the curls of steel fall off onto the desk.

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Ok so I am now considering just grabbing a cheaper knife and learning to keep it sharp. If I use it enough to justify nicer more expensive ones.. I will buy them in time. I might be able to sharpen some of my older knives too for now. It seems like a good idea to do this, rather than spend $70-100 on a knife I don't know how to look after.

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Ok so I am now considering just grabbing a cheaper knife and learning to keep it sharp. If I use it enough to justify nicer more expensive ones.. I will buy them in time. I might be able to sharpen some of my older knives too for now. It seems like a good idea to do this, rather than spend $70-100 on a knife I don't know how to look after.

Which is why I suggested the ones I did. Raco has been a Name in kitchenware for a looooong time - they didn't do that through being shit. I'd much rather have a set of Racos than some of the more expensive stuff around (Wiltshire 'Staysharp' comes to mind - my god those are crap).

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Which is why I suggested the ones I did. Raco has been a Name in kitchenware for a looooong time - they didn't do that through being shit. I'd much rather have a set of Racos than some of the more expensive stuff around (Wiltshire 'Staysharp' comes to mind - my god those are crap).

Haha.. I have one of those Wiltshire knives, and it is one of my best.. put it most of the way through my hand one day too.. oops :(

You can see why I am looking to upgrade.. I'm slowly replacing shit I bought 4-5 years ago when I first moved out and got my own place.

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Ok so I am now considering just grabbing a cheaper knife and learning to keep it sharp. If I use it enough to justify nicer more expensive ones.. I will buy them in time. I might be able to sharpen some of my older knives too for now. It seems like a good idea to do this, rather than spend $70-100 on a knife I don't know how to look after.

Which is why I suggested the ones I did. Raco has been a Name in kitchenware for a looooong time - they didn't do that through being shit. I'd much rather have a set of Racos than some of the more expensive stuff around (Wiltshire 'Staysharp' comes to mind - my god those are crap).

 

I didn't read your Raco post before. I bought that very set for my Mom a few years ago and they are still going strong. The steel is a little soft for my liking, though that is a good thing if you're learning to sharpen a blade. For the price they are a great buy and are a fine choice for a decent first set of knives.

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I wouldn't say the Globals and other Japanese knives are no good because they use a soft steel and therefore require more sharpening. Its the design philosophy that the Japanese use. They are masters at sharpening and tempering blades, and knife sharpening and upkeep is a vital part of Japanese chef's skillsets.

 

From what I have learned, Japanese knives use a softer metal to get a higher sharpness, while European knives use a harder metal for longer life and more resilience against losing what edge they have, as the requirements of Japanese knives are somewhat different. Japanese cooking involves a lot of small, fidly and very delicate preparation, and cutting of raw meats with precision, so a sharper knife is more important than an edge that last for weeks or months.

 

European cooking uses a lot of simple slicing and chopping onto a chopping board, whereas much of Japanese food preparation uses the knife off the chopping board, so the impact on the fine edge of the blade is less. Hence the Euro knives such as Wusthof have hard alloy steels like Chromium, Molybdenum Vanadium alloys, which take a while longer to sharpen.

 

Regarding those sharpeners, one has to remember they usually sharpen the knife at a 30 degree edge angle, so you should really only use knives that already have a 30deg angle already. The carbide section is for repairing badly damaged or very blunt blades, and the ceramic section is more for sharpening and edge upkeep. Very little pressure is usually required when using these sharpeners, so its not surprising one would see strips of metal being shaved off the blade if you're pushing on it too hard.

 

The hand steels which are those round bars that you see chefs whisk their knives over are not for sharpening at all...they simply remove the patina off the edge of the blade before use. Steel which sits for any length of time oxidises and develops a fine layer of rough, oxidised metal, or patina on the edge, which can dull the blade, the steels simply remove this, before use.

 

A lot of knives use different blade angles, depending on their application. For example the Wusthof Classic Nakiri vege slicer we have has a very fine, thin blade of less than 20deg - using one of these sharpeners would destroy the blade.

 

Its OK to have one or 2 knives for all purposes, but when you get down to the fine detail of use and application, the various properties of different blade designs start to become apparent, and for discerning chefs, particular blades for particular jobs becomes a necessity.

Edited by Antraman

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I'm far from a discerning chef, I am actually still learning how to cook a lot of things, but in the last few months have been taking to the kitchen a lot more instead of ordering take away. I probably don't even know how to use a knife properly :)

 

Taking into account everything you've all said, a hardier knife might be the way to go.

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I wouldn't say the Globals and other Japanese knives are no good because they use a soft steel and therefore require more sharpening.

As an overall rule, that is true enough. Once you start getting into the higher end of the Japanese market that goes right out the window. Spend $700 to $1,000 on a SAJI cooks knife and I'll eat my hat if you have to sharpen it more than 3 time over your entire lifetime. Best knives in the world in my experience. They look fucking awesome, too.

 

I probably don't even know how to use a knife properly :)

 

Edited by disolusiond

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European cooking uses a lot of simple slicing and chopping onto a chopping board, whereas much of Japanese food preparation uses the knife off the chopping board, so the impact on the fine edge of the blade is less. Hence the Euro knives such as Wusthof have hard alloy steels like Chromium, Molybdenum Vanadium alloys, which take a while longer to sharpen.

 

...

 

Its OK to have one or 2 knives for all purposes, but when you get down to the fine detail of use and application, the various properties of different blade designs start to become apparent, and for discerning chefs, particular blades for particular jobs becomes a necessity.

Regarding chopping boards, OP... Use a timber one, in case you aren't already. You can get all sorts of glass and plastic, but don't fall for it. Glass is much harder on the edge than anything else, and plastic is actually worse for retaining bacteria than the timber.

...

And I too don't see how people can recommend doing everything with only one blade. I have seen Chinese chefs do amazingly intricate vegetable carving with gigantic cleavers, but that doesn't make cleavers the appropriate tools for the job - it makes those chefs f'ing amazing. Some things will be much better served by having a small blade (paring knife), some want a huge flat one (ham slicer), and some even want a heavy serrated one (bread knife). Ever tried tackling a pumpkin with a 6" vegetable slicer?

 

Blade designs have proliferated for the simple reason that one blade is not suitable for everything.

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Blade designs have proliferated for the simple reason that one blade is not suitable for everything.

Word. You need 4 knives imo, and those will do everything you will need to do. Chefs knife, paring knife, cleaver and a filleting knife.

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Ok so I was out at lunchtime today and pulled the trigger on this.. I got a set of 4 Scanpan knives and a ceramic sharpener to look after them. Comes with an 18cm chefs knife, an 18cm bread knife, a 14cm santoku knife, a 9cm paring kife. I can go home and throw out a bunch of crap tonight.

 

Will see how I go with these for a while before investing in something nicer, these were actually a pretty cheap set on special so decided to grab them. I will consider some of the nicer more expensive knives on an as required basis, like when I learn to use these properly and can appreciate a finer blade.

 

Thanks for the advice guys :)

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Cool. And learn when to SHARPEN and when to HONE! They are different.

 

Honing restores an edge.

Sharpening GIVES an edge.

 

If the edge is lost from feathering, then hone.

If the edge is flat, sharpen.

 

Easiest way to check when learning is to not touch it, but look at it. Hold it edge up and let the light bounce off the edge. If you see light bouncing off an edge, then it's got a flat point. Sharpen.

 

If you don't see light bouncing, then it's sharp enough and just needs honing.

 

Honing is done with ceramic/steel. They call them "Sharpeners". They're not. They're honers.

 

Grind stone is for sharpening.

 

AD

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Just spent the last 30 mins while eating lunch watching videos about sharpening on youtube. The ceramic rod I bought has a 'ribbed' side and a smoothe side for both kinds of sharpening.. hopefully does the trick :)

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Sounds like you picked up a nice set of knives. Scanpan make some nice stuff. Could you post a picture of the "ceramic sharpener" you purchased, please? The description you gave has left me a little concerned, like you should never touch a knife with it concerned.

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