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hawkeye

What of Atomic?

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David you're an hero for saving the forums. A deadset hero.

 

Thanks man. You know what it means.

There was a fight for em? Gah, i hate publishing. :(

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Glad to hear the forums will stick around

 

Damm right shame guys I've been with the community since Issue 1.

 

Sad day for the community but you've got to do what works for the company.

 

Looks forward to the 16 pages next year

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Before the end of all this, any chance I could get a giant poster sized version of the cover of issue 6?

 

 

'

You looked fucking hot on that cover. I hope the years have been good to you.

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David you're an hero for saving the forums. A deadset hero.

 

Thanks man. You know what it means.

What the man said.

 

Very sad day, but you've done so much for this community hawkeye, keep your head up sir.

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Wow. Big news, that's for sure. Sad news, in many ways :-( Especially so for those who were not able to make the transition. But it's not all doom and gloom - as Flouncy said, the magazine kicked fucking arse. No, wait, I mean, as Flouncy said, the forums survive. There is still light to be thankful for :-)

 

I was living in a sharehouse with two other geeks when Atomic first came out. I remember killing time in a newsagent in the city between uni lectures when one of the guys - forumite segger, for those who remember - picked up the first issue of Atomic and said, "wow, these guys really look like they know what they're talking about." The three of us were at uni, studying various aspects of IT, so often only one of us (or possibly two of us, if we were splitting it) would buy it and the whole household would read it. Many, many were the nights, so late it was early in the morning, that we'd take a break from our lan games and uni assignments to congregate in the kitchen, making tea and Vegemite on toast, Atomic open on the kitchen counter as we all chatted enthusiastically about this or that article. It became almost like a little ritual for us :-)

 

Then we joined the forums shortly thereafter. And it was exactly like those post-midnight kitchen discussions, only with more people. It was a wonderful feeling :-)

 

It was a wonderful time to be a geek - and an Atomican :-)

 

David you're an hero for saving the forums. A deadset hero.

 

Thanks man. You know what it means.

Quoted. For. Emphasis.

Very few here would really understand what it is that you do for Atomic as a whole, but especially for these forums. I can't claim to be one of them, of course, but I am grateful that you continually kick all kinds of arse for us. We all are, even if we don't always show it :-)

 

Hats off to all those who took up the challenge of creating and generating the magazine over the years - or, because it's me, frogs for all :-) Multicoloured frogs :-)

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figured I'd put this up here, not just on facebook. but, yeah. anyway.

 

to Ben and Ashton--I figure your eyes will land on this eventually--thanks, a thousand times and more, for that first real honest-to-god writing gig. that big break, really. the xbmc tutorial. tolerating a hundred shit versions until you got one you were happy with. all that feedback was gold. and then the games articles and the .edu column, which lasted I don't know how long--I mean, it was an idea Ben and I discussed when he was still there, not as editor but in that role that came next (benevolent overseer? I forget what the actual title was). truly learnt a lot more from Ben and Ashton and then Logan and David than I did in an actual writing diploma. a mark is one thing. hugely positive or ... not so positive feedback from someone that basically pays your rent is worth a little more, on more than just the monetary level, than some end-of-semester marks.

 

the magazine itself did so many crazy things that all the other big players in the Australian marketplace--maybe globally, even, I don't know--were largely ignoring. case modding and everything else--all those guys buying a Lian Li and hacking at it with a dremel and blinging it up, fast and furiously, with perspex and neons and extra fans. altho', as more of a gamer and general geek than anything else, I always enjoyed gearbox and the interview section a whole lot more. and, yeah, those oppurtunities. Q&A w/ Jimmy Wales. super cool. not being told to fuck off when I wanted to focus more on the ... philosophy, I guess, of AI and less on the actual technology.

 

the community it inspired was something else too. I remember back in the early days, PCPP vs atomicmpc. and being a PCPP reader and forum whore at the time, too. met so many great people. many of them are now great and important and close friends. and those beerathons and everything else: might not be the most social person, even among this crowd, but that was all great.

 

let us know if and when you're down here David. there shall be expensive food and beer and etc.

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Now I feel bad about not renewing my subscription this year :/

 

Been buying the mag since issue 14, had a great time on the forums, made some friends, got a break into writing thanks to Ben Mansill (it wasn't really for me but I appreciate the opportunity all the same :) )

 

I feel pretty sad that the mag is ending but the content just didn't interest me any more (I think a large part of that was me getting older, plus tweaking/gaming becoming more mainstream).

 

But I hope that this will provide more opportunites for Atomic as a brand and a community to move forward in the future.

 

Thanks Ben, David, everyone involved; Atomic was a big part of my life in my late teens and no matter what happens its something I'll always remember fondly.

Edited by DonutKing

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Atomic, you lost your edge a long time ago.. I don't even know what happen, change of editor didn't help.. you went from being MPC to MPG but I stoped reading you a long time ago.. now you have lost everything.. sads. atomic was never about the games for me, it was about taking technology to the extreme.. now it seem like just a blip in time before "overclocking" become mainstream and atomic followed that carrot down the rabbit hole.

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They had to adapt Bob. It was no longer about using tape and pencils. Suddenly motherboards came with BIOS's that all you had to do to overclock was press a button. Not a great article there.

 

Graphic ard manufacturers NEVER repeated the situation of the 9600 upgrade to 9800 with a small solder mod.

 

Where do you draw the line?

 

They want to be tech, but the started getting chopped out of the equation.

 

It's sad. It meant we lost our geek edge to the mainstream.

 

And I never got part 2 of peltiers (I joke with Flouncy about this every other opportunity)

 

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What will happen to Flouncy's Column? That's the very thing I anticipate every month 1st thing I look at. (sorry hawkeye but your editors note gets 2nd place ) :(

 

So who's going to be editor of PCTA?

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Lol bobthemonkey is back this thread is gonna get fucked up and derailed reeeeeeeeeeal fast.

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It's sad. It meant we lost our geek edge to the mainstream.

 

pfft that's a copout.. The Emperor Has No Clothes! there is so much science and technology on the fringe.

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How is it a cop-out. Science is all well and wonderful. But how could you apply that to a geek at home with a pencil, an eraser, some sticky tape and a screwdriver?

 

The original Atomic was about bring OC'ing to the geek-masses. Then, suddenly it became mainstream.

 

It's like smartphones. Suddenly, everyone has one and you are having to help your Granny with installing Angry Birds.

 

Can YOU suggest something a geek could do to their PC that would give them a performance edge? Something that any geek could do with minimal parts? (Think of the pencil hack for the duron core from issue 1 for an example).

 

This is what I'm trying to say. Overclocking became mainstream. Atomic and their OverClocking awesomeness got overtaken by manufacturers building it into their systems. Boring. Not a great article there.

 

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How is it a cop-out. Science is all well and wonderful. But how could you apply that to a geek at home with a pencil, an eraser, some sticky tape and a screwdriver?

 

The original Atomic was about bring OC'ing to the geek-masses. Then, suddenly it became mainstream.

 

It's like smartphones. Suddenly, everyone has one and you are having to help your Granny with installing Angry Birds.

 

Can YOU suggest something a geek could do to their PC that would give them a performance edge? Something that any geek could do with minimal parts? (Think of the pencil hack for the duron core from issue 1 for an example).

 

This is what I'm trying to say. Overclocking became mainstream. Atomic and their OverClocking awesomeness got overtaken by manufacturers building it into their systems. Boring. Not a great article there.

 

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I guess one can argue that Atomic could have up'ed the ante. Advanced technology is commercially available and full of great tinkering potential. Arduino for example. You can do some awesome little projects on those boards. Or delve into the more interesting aspects of computer science, like machine learning and AI. The problem is, people have this naive idea that computers are all about sticking expansion cards into a motherboard, or switching a few variables in a BIOS to make benchmarks go faster. Do any computer related course at uni and none of this shit is ever mentioned, because it's all consumer garbage. For this reason, Atomic was stuck between a rock and a hard place. If they attempted to do anything befitting of a true computing enthusiast, they'd have isolated the majority of their audience, who know little more than sticking a larger cooler onto whatever happens to be the chip of choice at the time. However, by sticking with what people know, computer manufacturers had advanced enough to make anything an everyday geek could do obsolete. Atomic didn't change, the market did. Now we have better consumer parts which don't need hacks to work well.

 

Atomic's staff writers don't have computing degrees (as far as I know). Writing advanced articles, especially when under time constraints, wasn't going to happen. So much effort would have to be put in just to make it accessible to the reader. That being said, Zebra did a fantastic job introducing some of the more lower level concepts into the magazine. The main issue is, it's very hard to translate these ideas into a "here's what you can try at home" kind of deal. You need a strong hands on bond to keep people reading, because for everything else there's online alternatives. When you have places like The Verge with beautiful reviews and news articles, you simply cannot compete with dead paper and monthly releases.

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How do you integrate that into a print mag, BTM, without making it so niche that sales plummet because people aren't interested?

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How do you integrate that into a print mag, BTM, without making it so niche that sales plummet because people aren't interested?

Entertainment Weekly embedded an Android phone into one of its issues.. anything is possible ;)

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How do you integrate that into a print mag, BTM, without making it so niche that sales plummet because people aren't interested?

Entertainment Weekly embedded an Android phone into one of its issues.. anything is possible ;)

 

Only the first 1000 copies, and they would have made a loss offset by the publicity.

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Sad, but i guess the writing was on the wall...

 

I still remember the ad for the mag in PC aut all those years ago... it was the mag that we needed!

 

Good times, when overclocking and water cooling were DIY exploits and the PC was king for gaming...

 

But the times are a changing...

 

Great to see the forums staying, and to all those, goodluck with what's next!!

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