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MrFriendly

I humbly seek your advice on where to start.

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Ok,

 

So the other day my little Raspberry Pi arrived. Why did I get it? on a whim, I missed the old days of tinkering with things and I've always wanted to learn to program and use Linux.

 

Here's my problem, I don't know anything about Linux, really, or where to start. I've ordered a couple of books specifically for the PI, and I've install a Debian VM on the PC to help get my head around it all, but, I'm just overwhelmed by my ignorance about everything to do with it. There's tones of guides to do stuff, but they just tell you commands to enter and I don't really know what the context is or what those commands mean.

 

It comes down to the way I learn things, I guess, I need to understand the context of things. The CLI alone is totally over my head. VI is over my head. I guess I need to know what all the individual components all are and they all tie together, and why.

 

Any how, ya'll started somewhere right? Treat me like I'm five, where do I start to learn the basics, where did you learn? What are really good resources for Linux thick shits like myself?

 

You kind patience and wisdom is appreciated

 

signed, a humble man wanting to learn new things.

 

MrF

Edited by MrFriendly

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Im a linux noob too, but i'm one step above yourself it sounds.

IMO start by learning commands that will be used universally; there are a few.

 

For example, most builds come with (or you can easily add) SAMBA to make windows netwrk shares. so learn its commands and share some folders.

the apt commands are beyond useful; "apt-get install samba"

IMO there are no beginner resources worth their salt. Nothing ive read has ever explained, say, startup items. I THINK its got something to do with init.d, but to this day, I have no idea.

 

its my strong opinion all new computer systems need a good network, so learn ifconfig and how to config your network and maybe something about iptables?

 

Basically decide on a project, think of a goal (how about a LAMP server?) and look at how-to's and if you see a command that doesnt make common sense, google it.

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Ditch Vi, get Vim >.> Or, even better if you get a GUI going rather than a bare shell, there are versions like gVim and etc that are much easier to get your head around, not needing to remember every single :command

 

Almost everything I know about Linux, I learned from reading random shit in Atomic or online, or from having to use some old RH build at uni in the compsci building.

 

Maybe the CLI aspect was less of a struggle because I grew up with an Amiga? I know typing 'dir' instead of just 'ls' confused the heck out of me when I first started using MS DOS.

 

 

Man pages are your friend. You can glean some context on CLI commands, at least, from the different switches they list, if nothing else.

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Well, after much poking around I've found the Debian Administrators Handbook which looks like it will contain just about all the information I'll need. So I should read it most thoroughly.

 

Next step, dream up and think of little projects to do on both the VM and the Pi and just start getting right into it.

 

Nich, which both Debian and Raspbian have GUIs, I'm a nuts and bolts kinda guy, I wanted to get right under the hood, thought it looks like I'm biting off far more than I can chew.

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Mate, it's like a completely new and different job. Feels a bit daunting at first, and you think maybe it was more than you were ready for, but after a while, you get used to it. :)

 

 

 

edit: how in the name of fuck did it post the same damn thing twice in the same fucking post?

Edited by Midnighter

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Do things the distro's way. In your case, the Debian way. Every distro does things slightly different, e.g. where it stores things, what it names them, ways to manage the system. Find the official doco for the distro and always read the relevant part before doing anything.

 

Nearly gone are the days when you needed to compile anything (for the popular distros)...however, sometimes you will need to. In that case, never do it as root until you understand what it's going to do, so you will know how to undo it if it breaks things.

 

Same applies if you find a solution on the Internet or even in a book...try to work out if it applies to your environment, what the individual commands do, etc. Understand what you're doing, don't just blindly copy anything.

 

Use Google, doco, man, etc., to understand what a command does, its arguments, etc. To understand the command line in general, I recommend this No Starch Press book (who release other good books on open source software).

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Hi, I started with Ashton Mills Uber Atomic Firewall Project.

 

It's quite dated now as far as package names go, but still relevant.

 

you can find a copy of it here. Journalist's Awards.

 

I appreciated Ashtons layman approach. still do.

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