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Pete

Nostalgia of programming days

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Hi,

Caught up with a mate after work today. We went to a cafe talking about the usual things, i.e. life, work, everyday stuff... then we got onto the topic of our programming days at uni, when we were in our late teens/early 20s writting assembly language programs. More accurately, pining for those programming days.

 

We discussed our favourite CPU back in the day being the 6502, then moving to the 8086 family of processors. We talked about alot of areas, graphics\sound programming, hardware/software interrupts, raster rates, undocumented resolution modes... we probably went on for an hour, hour an half.

 

As we were getting up to leave, some guy (sitting a couple of tables away) comes up to us and starts with "It warms my heart to hear other people talking about assembly language".

He looked like a friendly enough guy, so we all introduced ourselves, and then had a quick 5 minute discussion sharing what work/programming we do now (ain't assembly), what projects we did for fun, and how we enjoyed the programming scene in the 90's.

 

It feels good that there are others out there with similar interests in not so well known hobbies.

 

Anyway, just wanted to share my cafe adventure.

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I hate assembly. So pointless these days. Oh well i passed those subjects, and hopefully i'll never have to see machine code again!

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I hate assembly. So pointless these days. Oh well i passed those subjects, and hopefully i'll never have to see machine code again!

Machine code? Isn't that binary? Why would you code in binary?

 

There's assembly for that.

 

But then, why code in assembly when you can code in 3GL?

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Sheesh, I remember learning some basic coding/programming in high school (about 22 years ago), on a MS DOS system...I should have stuck with it :P

Edited by DEVERE

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22 years ago? come on dev... your not THAT old...

 

 

:P

Hahaha, you're kidding me right???

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I still do 6502.

 

I remember 20 years ago starting on 68000. It was like an answer to a dream - it had all those instructions that you wished the 6502 had. Logical though, given that the 6502 was a kinda ripoff of the 6800 which in turn evolved into the 68000 series.

 

After 68000 came IBM System 370 Assembler (mainframe). It's CISC in it's almost purest form. These days there are instructions like SRST (Search String) which make it almost a high-level language.

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I hate assembly. So pointless these days. Oh well i passed those subjects, and hopefully i'll never have to see machine code again!

Machine code? Isn't that binary? Why would you code in binary?

 

There's assembly for that.

 

But then, why code in assembly when you can code in 3GL?

 

Someone will correct me if im wrong, but machine code = assembly.

 

At one point earlier this year I started learning x86 assembly... can't quite remember why though *raises eyebrow*

 

Ohh! I do. I wanted to write my own bootloader.

 

Rob.

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Assembler/assembly is typically what you call your source code.

 

Machine language is essentially the product of assembling your source. Instructions and data/labels in the source translate to opcodes and operands in memory.

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Assembler/assembly is typically what you call your source code.

 

Machine language is essentially the product of assembling your source. Instructions and data/labels in the source translate to opcodes and operands in memory.

A wikipedia has revealed that this is 100% correct, and I was wrong.

 

Rob.

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You can assemble by hand with an opcode chart, or from memory if you're 1337, but it's a major PITA.

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22 years ago? come on dev... your not THAT old...

 

 

:P

Hahaha, you're kidding me right???

 

/breaks out spare walker frame.

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Yes I still remember programming in 6502 on an Apple II I bought in 1980.

 

Come to think of it a lot of the programming was centred around breaking the copy protection on games.

 

It wasn't the piracy we were interested in - but just the fun of cracking a game.

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I hate assembly. So pointless these days. Oh well i passed those subjects, and hopefully i'll never have to see machine code again!

Machine code? Isn't that binary? Why would you code in binary?

 

There's assembly for that.

 

But then, why code in assembly when you can code in 3GL?

 

Well its as close to machine code i've ever written. I mean its basically one step off the hex codes straight into memory so i think it's basically zero's and ones.

 

 

You can assemble by hand with an opcode chart, or from memory if you're 1337, but it's a major PITA.

Indeed you can. And thats what your doing most of the time anyway, with opcodes replaced with various test based op codes.

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Example from a 6812...

 

32-bit addition P=N+M

	  org   $0800
N   .blkb   4  ; first 32-bit number
M   .blkb   4  ; second 32-bit number
P   .blkb   4  ; third 32-bit number
	  org   $F000
; 32 bit addition P=N+M
; Input:   Two 32-bit numbers N,M
; Output:   One 32 bit sum P
; Error:   C/V set for unsigned/signed overflow
add32 ldaa   N+3  ; start with least significant byte
	  adda   M+3
	  staa   P+3
	  ldaa   N+2  ; next byte
	  adca   M+2  ; carry from previous addition
	  staa   P+2
	  ldaa   N+1  ; next byte
	  adca   M+1  ; carry from previous addition
	  staa   P+1
	  ldaa   N	; last byte
	  adca   M	; carry from previous addition
	  staa   P
; C bit set if unsigned overflow
; V bit set if signed overflow
; Z bit set if result is zero
	  rts

I used to code 6805's as an Engineer then 68HC11 although a lot of that was compiled C.

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If only I had the time - I have several applications where a bit of assembly and the right chip could solve a few problems for me, but my time seems to be full up doing other things, which is annoying.

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