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XBOX ONE

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Has this been posted yet?

 

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Ever since I got my first console - an NES - I've done something all of us have. You find a friend who has the same console as you, and who has different games than you, and you start loaning each other your games. This practice is as old as the console market itself, and allows you to play games you otherwise wouldn't buy - and thus, expand your horizons.

 

The best example I know of how important this is was Japanese RPGs. I generally dislike them, and don't enjoy them at all, meaning I would never spend any money on them. However, one of my friends is a huge fan, and through him, I got to play Tales Of Vesperia - now firmly one of my best games I've ever played.

 

Microsoft is planning to make this age-old practice impossible or at the very least incredibly annoying and costly. The Xbox One will still have traditional game discs, but installation to the hard drive has become mandatory. Once you install a disc to the hard drive (which is, as I said, mandatory), you can play the game without the disc, but said game is now tied to your Xbox Live account. If you want to loan this game to a friend, he will not be able to play it unless he pays a fee (as of yet undefined by Microsoft).

Link 2

 

So, the Xbox One disaster continues. Microsoft's policy for dealing with the used games market has reportedly leaked - and it's a clear and direct attack to destroy the used games market. Prices for used games will be set at the retail value of a new game, and retailers have to hook into Microsoft's computer systems and comply with Microsoft's terms and conditions.

 

The policy, independently reported on by several sites, works as such. Gamers can only sell "their" used games to Microsoft-approved retailers who are hooked into Microsoft's computer systems. Once a gamer has sold "his" game to the retailer, said retailer will enter this information in Microsoft's systems. The gamer's Xbox One will phone home every day, and the game that has just been sold to the retailer will be automatically removed from the gamer's Xbox One.

 

The retailer can then sell the game, but both Microsoft and the game's original publisher will get a set cut from said sale. The leaked information suggests the retailer's cut will be as little as 10%. The information also details that the activation price consumers will pay for used games will be £35, which means retailers only get a cut of about £3.50 - much less than what they get from used games today. I'm assuming that the computer systems and costs for joining the program aren't low, either.

 

This policy is a clear and concerted effort by Microsoft and publishers to - excuse my wording - fuck consumers and destroy the market for used games, and, in one fell swoop, also destroy the 'market' for borrowing games to and from friends. This makes it incredibly costly for gamers to expand horizons, and as such, it will actually lead to reduced overall sales.

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Yes, I agree that it will result in fewer sales of games overall, but I bet MS is hoping that with less used games there will be more new games, hence more profit.

 

Very dirty on them, I've bought two 360 consoles and the original Xbox, but considering it's less powerful than the PS4 and fucks with consumers (I lend and borrow games with my friends pretty often), I can't see much of a reason to buy the XB1. Maybe E3 will change the decision, but I doubt it.

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Yeah, its a disappointing direction MS have taken and makes me wonder if they really do know their audience at all.

 

As much as I dislike the 2nd hand game market (mainly the fact that developers see zero profit from a 2nd hand purchase while retailers see sometimes 100%+ profit) I find the way MS is going about it to be completely ridiculous and very anti-consumer. Don't bite the hand that feeds you and all that. The Xbox fanboys will probably buy one regardless and while I consider myself a fan of the Xbox 360 ans consider it to be the best console of this generation, that will not rope me into buying an XB1. The only XB1 game that interests me is Forza 5 (and even then, thats only if they confirm compatibility of Xbox 360 compatible wheels), so if I ever did get one, it would only be for that game, can't see myself spending $900 on a console for a $100 game.

 

PS4 I'm almost considering dropping a preorder on, but I'll wait until E3, with my current PC, the only thing that will make me buy a console is the exclusives, I basically bought a WiiU just for ZombiU and Mario, so the PS4 will want some good launch exclusives to sway me.

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Yeah not cool.

 

If they go all bonkers about this online digital distribution thing and start having prices and sales similar that to Steam and other online only platforms then I won't care so much about this 2nd hand game market.

 

I mean i haven't played a second hand game on a PC for years and years and it's never been a problem.

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Yeah, I was thinking about that earlier. I guess the thing is, I can buy a digital copy of a AAA PC game for anywhere between $30-$50, whereas atm, digital console games are going for nearly retail prices, if the price trend continues with the next gen of consoles, I think microsoft may lose out, games are priced ridiculously in Australia and this will just hurt us in the pocket even more.

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TBH, not swapping games is fine. Steam. Know what I do when I visit a friend's place and want to play a game I have but he doesn't? Log in to my steam account and download it.

 

The only people this will fuck over and make me feel bad about, are rental places, and parents with almost no disposable income, who make do with second hand games because the alternative was no games.

 

That being said, you're paying for a licence to the game. Not the media. This is really the direct result of online stores. What's a real shame is the second hand retailer getting such a small cut. I can't imagine it'll do much to increase the price people will get for second hand games, either.

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I imagine Microsoft was under a lot of pressure from EA, Activision, and various other vested parties, to address the used games issue. It's impossible to know what the outcome will be on the industry because it's never been done before, but obviously they think the negatives will be outweighed by removing the clearly shitty system of 95% used game price ---> 0% received by developer.

 

This was never an "if it ain't broke don't fix it" situation. The system was broken.

 

What I don't get though is why game lending had to become a casualty in that crossfire. Could they not have built a feature into XBL2.0 where you can "LEND" a game to an XBL friend. Your console could just be unable to launch the game until you "unlend" it by putting a disc back into your console, at which point your friend can no longer launch it. One lend at a time.

 

It's like dropping a nuke on something when some more tactful things could at least have been tried first.

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I still don't see how publishers/developers need a slice of used game sales, car manufacturers get nothing from the sale of a secondhand car. It's just greedy.

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agreed it is just pure greed. Unless of course they run a free online service for multiplayer, then they've gotta pay for the servers some how. And that's where the Playstation PSN pass sort of works. You can buy a game second hand, just not get online with it if it requires a PSN Pass until you buy one.

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I still don't see how publishers/developers need a slice of used game sales, car manufacturers get nothing from the sale of a secondhand car. It's just greedy.

You can bet they would if they could, though.

 

There's zero risk in a second-hand game, very much unlike cars, which have significant wear-and-tear issues and complex warranty systems. Therefore, maybe used games are more prolific than other used items (at a guess). Also I would think few people on the planet would buy a car for one week and then decide they'd experienced all they wanted from it and were ready to swap it on. Digital content is a bit unique like that.

 

In any case, I don't think the core intent is that people shouldn't be able to sell what they buy (they should). The issue is about mitigating a detrimental black hole in the gamedev economy. If it was only the average person selling and trading games on a small scale it would mean nothing, but the massive used games racket with no kickback to developers has long been acknowledged by a large part of the industry as problematic.

 

It's going to be interesting to see what happens.

 

Also - side note: how many more game generations do we have left with physical media? Because digitally bought games are generally not resell-able anyway (lendable? not sure), so the no-used-games norm is an absolutely certain future whether certain companies jump the gun or not.

Edited by xfu

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Also - side note: how many more game generations do we have left with physical media? Because digitally bought games are generally not lendable anyway, so the no-used-games norm is an absolutely certain future whether certain companies jump the gun or not.

 

PC games have been like this for a long time with tying your game key to an account.

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Lending games by temporarily making it unplayable on your own system is a good idea.

 

That it hasn't been taken up by Valve, makes me think moreso that games publishers will shit bricks, than it being technically unfeasable.

 

It's weird that Amazon are being more progressive on that point : \

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I buy 90% of my 360 games 2nd hand because I cant afford new prices even on older games that are 2,3,4 years old. As for PC I wait for sales any only buy ones I really,really want..

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Lol. I was waiting for a 2001: A Space Odyssey parody for the Xbox One and the Kinect 2.

Edited by TheFrunj

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from http://www.trueachievements.com/n13475/xbo...m?nlid=56\

 

Since the reveal of the Xbox One a few weeks ago, the internet has worked itself into a frenzy, with rumours of used game fees, privacy concerns and contradicting information regarding how often the new console would be required to connect to the internet to function.

 

With E3 now only a few days away, Microsoft has taken the sensible decision of detailing a number of their planned polices for the Xbox One, hopefully putting the vast majority of rumours to bed.

 

You're going to see a LOT of quotes below, but we'd rather you have the information straight from the source than through our filter.

 

Xbox One Game Licensing

 

With our modern architecture, Xbox One games will load more quickly, will be always accessible from the cloud, and there is no physical limit to the size or scope of the content provided.

 

Here are our platform policies and capabilities for game licensing – all of which will be made available when Xbox One launches later this year:

 

Buy the way you want—disc or digital—on the same day: You’ll be able to buy disc-based games at traditional retailers or online through Xbox Live, on day of release. Discs will continue to be a great way to install your games quickly.

 

Access your entire games library from any Xbox One—no discs required: After signing in and installing, you can play any of your games from any Xbox One because a digital copy of your game is stored on your console and in the cloud. So, for example, while you are logged in at your friend’s house, you can play your games.

 

Share access to your games with everyone inside your home: Your friends and family, your guests and acquaintances get unlimited access to all of your games. Anyone can play your games on your console--regardless of whether you are logged in or their relationship to you.

 

Give your family access to your entire games library anytime, anywhere: Xbox One will enable new forms of access for families. Up to ten members of your family can log in and play from your shared games library on any Xbox One. Just like today, a family member can play your copy of Forza Motorsport at a friend’s house. Only now, they will see not just Forza, but all of your shared games. You can always play your games, and any one of your family members can be playing from your shared library at a given time.

 

Trade-in and resell your disc-based games: Today, some gamers choose to sell their old disc-based games back for cash and credit. We designed Xbox One so game publishers can enable you to trade in your games at participating retailers. Microsoft does not charge a platform fee to retailers, publishers, or consumers for enabling transfer of these games.

 

Give your games to friends: Xbox One is designed so game publishers can enable you to give your disc-based games to your friends. There are no fees charged as part of these transfers. There are two requirements: you can only give them to people who have been on your friends list for at least 30 days and each game can only be given once.

 

In our role as a game publisher, Microsoft Studios will enable you to give your games to friends or trade in your Xbox One games at participating retailers. Third party publishers may opt in or out of supporting game resale and may set up business terms or transfer fees with retailers. Microsoft does not receive any compensation as part of this. In addition, third party publishers can enable you to give games to friends. Loaning or renting games won’t be available at launch, but we are exploring the possibilities with our partners.

Privacy

 

Xbox One and Kinect offer easy and approachable ways to control your games and entertainment with your voice and gestures. By recognizing you, Xbox One can tailor personal experiences and customize content just for you.

 

At Microsoft, we prioritize your privacy. We understand that your personal data and privacy are important. Xbox One and Kinect will provide tools to put you in control of your data. These include:

 

You are in control of what Kinect can see and hear: By design, you will determine how responsive and personalized your Xbox One is to you and your family during setup. The system will navigate you through key privacy options, like automatic or manual sign in, privacy settings, and clear notifications about how data is used. When Xbox One is on and you’re simply having a conversation in your living room, your conversation is not being recorded or uploaded.

 

You are in control of when Kinect sensing is On, Off or Paused: If you don’t want the Kinect sensor on while playing games or enjoying your entertainment, you can pause Kinect. To turn off your Xbox One, just say “Xbox Off.” When the system is off, it’s only listening for the single voice command -- “Xbox On,” and you can even turn that feature off too. Some apps and games may require Kinect functionality to operate, so you’ll need to turn it back on for these experiences.

 

You are in control of your personal data: You can play games or enjoy applications that use data, such as videos, photos, facial expressions, heart rate and more, but this data will not leave your Xbox One without your explicit permission. Here are a few examples of potential future scenarios:

A fitness game could measure heart rate data to provide you with improved feedback on your workout, allow you to track your progress, or even measure calories burned.

A card game could allow you to bluff your virtual opponent using your facial expressions.

 

You can use other inputs to control your games, TV and entertainment experiences: While it’s faster to find what you’re looking for using your voice and gesture commands with Kinect, you can use a controller, your remote controls or your smart devices instead. And you can use all of these devices when Kinect is paused.

Connectivity

 

Xbox One will deliver new benefits for gamers that are only possible with a system designed from the ground up to be ready and connected. Here are just a few examples:

 

A new generation of games with power from the cloud: Because every Xbox One owner has a broadband connection, developers can create massive, persistent worlds that evolve even when you’re not playing.

 

Your Xbox One is always ready: Xbox One is designed to run in a low-powered, connected state. This means your system, games and apps are always current and ready to play—no more waiting for updates.

 

Stay connected to your friends: Never miss an opportunity to play games with your friends or to catch up with family on Skype. Use Skype in Snap mode to chat while you play games or watch TV. Or enjoy group video Skype calls with people around the world, all from the comfort of your living room.

 

Access your entire games library from any Xbox One—no discs required: After signing in and installing, you can play any of your games from any Xbox One because a digital copy of your game is stored on your console and in the cloud. So, for example, while you are logged in at your friend’s house, you can play your games.

 

Buy the way you want—disc or digital—on the same day: You’ll be able to buy disc-based games at traditional retailers or online through Xbox Live, on day of release.

 

 

Networking Technologies

 

A range of advanced technologies will make these scenarios possible, including:

 

Superior wireless performance and coverage throughout the home: Xbox One is equipped with a gigabit Ethernet port and 802.11n wireless. With 802.11n, Xbox One can use the 5GHz wireless band which eliminates considerable interference from other devices in the home, such as cordless phones, Bluetooth devices and microwaves. Xbox One uses two wireless antennas, versus one in Xbox 360. This provides dramatically better coverage and sustained performance, which means faster internet speeds in more areas of your home.

 

Faster connection to a world of smart devices: With Wi-Fi Direct, Xbox One can speak directly to smart wireless devices and connect to them through the cloud. This means your smartphone or tablet will interact with Xbox One seamlessly.

 

Future proofed with power from the cloud: Microsoft has created a global network of more than 300,000 Xbox Live and Windows Azure servers, to help creators realize their visions of what is possible with a connected system.

 

 

Networking Requirements

 

To ensure Xbox One works optimally and can offer the experiences described above, it is designed with the following networking requirements:

 

For an optimal experience, we recommend a broadband connection of 1.5Mbps. (For reference, the average global internet connection speed as measured recently by Akamai was 2.9 Mbps). In areas where an Ethernet connection is not available, you can connect using mobile broadband.

 

While a persistent connection is not required, Xbox One is designed to verify if system, application or game updates are needed and to see if you have acquired new games, or resold, traded in, or given your game to a friend. Games that are designed to take advantage of the cloud may require a connection.

 

With Xbox One you can game offline for up to 24 hours on your primary console, or one hour if you are logged on to a separate console accessing your library. Offline gaming is not possible after these prescribed times until you re-establish a connection, but you can still watch live TV and enjoy Blu-ray and DVD movies.

Does any of the above information change your opinion on the Xbox One, and if so how?

 

Thanks to all of the community members that suggested this story!

Edited by TheMojorising

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$599AUD.

 

November.

 

That's at least a hundred bucks less than I expected. Well done MS for not price gouging us. According to Ausgamers that's 100 more than the US price when converted, but $100 less than the EU price, so when you factor in shipping, the Aussie dollar and the GST it's not too bad at all.

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Yeah I think that's a pretty good outcome. In about 10 minutes we should hopefully have the PS4 price as well (not sure if local though - that was also good from MS).

 

I'm guessing same day launch - surely same/similar price, and then it'll come down to exclusives.

 

Going to predict right now that Sony has got some similar publisher-favouring systems in regards to DRM/used games, but will probably one-up it (or down, rather) for a bit of cred with gamers.

 

I can't say I saw ant must have exclusives in the XB1 session, save for maybe Sunset Overdrive because I usually enjoy Insomniac's games quite a lot. On PS4 for me there's main Killzone, and then a few new IPs I need to know more about, so I could probably say I'm near to the fence on what the likely launch lineup will be for exclusives.

 

I really have my eye set of Dark Souls 2 and BF4, as far as big games go. Both multiplatform.

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It's less than $100 more than the US price, really - US price is ex tax (because it varies from state to state). ~$50 extra isn't unreasonable, considering higher local costs.

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Yeah that guy shouldn't be allowed to speak to reporters though I really don't get the big deal about the always on thing.

 

The vast overwhelming majority has an internet connection whether its fast or slow. Enough to do the authenticating that is supposedly required.

 

Fact is, internet these days is pretty much a standard utility like water, gas and power - and no one complains that devices are dependant on those things.

Edited by TheMojorising

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