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sonofjorel88

XBOX ONE

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Meh.

 

PS4 reveals were done on a PC as well, from what I hear.

 

It's pretty standard for consoles that haven't come out yet, to run trade-show displays on the development platforms. For XB1 and PS4, that is essentially a PC.

 

I know they use development kits for things like E3 before the console is finalised, but surely these have similar hardware to what the actual console will use? An Intel CPU + Nvidia GPU won't be in the One, plus it's massively faster than the One will be in it any way

 

I dunno, colour me confused :-/

Edited by nobody813

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Put $10 down for one on launch day.

 

Not that I'm convinced I should get one but at least I got the option to get the Day 1 edition. If not I put that $10 towards something else at JB Hifi.

 

If sony have something special for launch I may do the same then make the choice later.

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Meh.

 

PS4 reveals were done on a PC as well, from what I hear.

 

It's pretty standard for consoles that haven't come out yet, to run trade-show displays on the development platforms. For XB1 and PS4, that is essentially a PC.

 

if they wanted to show what games will look and play like, they would of used An A10-6800k + either a 7770 or 7790, not an socket 2011 i7 cpu and gtx780 gpu, the performance gap between them is HUGE

 

 

I know they use development kits for things like E3 before the console is finalised, but surely these have similar hardware to what the actual console will use? An Intel CPU + Nvidia GPU won't be in the One, plus it's massively faster than the One will be in it any way

 

I dunno, colour me confused :-/

 

my thoughts exactly, sony always use's alpha kits that are within +/- 5-10%, Xbox/360 demos where on similar hardware, but this gen its radically different, the specs are so far from the console it breeds suspicion from all fronts.

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if they wanted to show what games will look and play like, they would of used An A10-6800k + either a 7770 or 7790, not an socket 2011 i7 cpu and gtx780 gpu, the performance gap between them is HUGE

how opyimised would the code bases be, this early?

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how opyimised would the code bases be, this early?

id say enough for a decent demo by the footage ive seen, they wouldn't let you play it if it wasn't at least a pretty stable beta quality, its also conceivable that since the new consoles are so similar to the pc, that they demoed the pc version with controller support and will backport optimizations into the console version once the game is of RC quality?

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Bethesda Softworks told Gamespot last week that the company "[hasn't] had time to fully understand and evaluate their policy." And Electronic Arts' Peter Moore told Polygon that the company had "not internally even begun to sit down and answer those questions [regarding used games]," also suggesting that the major publisher didn't know about Microsoft's plans ahead of time.

 

So if publisher pressure was part of the reason for Microsoft allowing used-disc-blocking in the first place, EA wasn't part of it. "As the guy who is the chief operating officer of Electronic Arts, I can tell you that EA did not aggressively lobby for the platform holders to put some gating function in there to allow or disallow used games," Moore said.

Excerpt from "Game publishers remaining quiet on used game policies for Xbox One" on Arstechnica.

 

It's hard to truly discern whether or not the gaming publishers were aware of the used game tax before announcement, but the quotes in this article and from other sources certainly make it appear that this was wholly instigated by Microsoft.

 

This has been one gigantic clusterfuck of a launch, it seems that every week merely brings more questions about the opaque policies, not answers.

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How many people trade second hand games?

It sounds like a great idea, I have stacks over the years that i haven't touched after 1 play through.

I've never actually traded or sold a game secondhand though.

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You know you've fucked up impressively when EA aren't the ones being evil

lmfao, post of the month gold right there!

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In an interview with Stevivor on May 22 Microsoft Xbox Australia spokesperson Adam Pollington remarked, "It’s also been stated that the Xbox One is ten times more powerful than the Xbox 360, so we’re effectively 40 times greater than the Xbox 360 in terms of processing capabilities [using the cloud]." (emphasis added)

 

Microsoft Game Studio chief Phil Spencer on Monday's episode of "Late Night With Jimmy Fallon" bragged that the Xbox 360 was 3x more powerful:

 

Later, at roughly 4 a.m. EST he took to Twitter to correct himself at least twice as he first said 8x, then 10x (without the cloud)

Excerpt from "Just How Powerful is the Xbox One? Microsoft is Confused", a semi blog post article by DailyTech.

 

To be honest I agree with the criticism, give us hard floating point figures so that we can compare the two systems. "3x performance" has always been too ambiguous for me unless backed by actual data.

 

Which is something MS isn't likely to do, of course, nor give the same figures for their cloud computing setup. Would it help them compare more favourably to Sony? Afaik Sony have not released their figures either.

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Here straight from the actual source.

 

http://news.xbox.com/2013/06/update

 

"Your Feedback Matters - an update on Xbox 1"

 

Last week at E3, the excitement, creativity and future of our industry was on display for a global audience.

 

For us, the future comes in the form of Xbox One, a system designed to be the best place to play games this year and for many years to come. As is our heritage with Xbox, we designed a system that could take full advantage of advances in technology in order to deliver a breakthrough in game play and entertainment. We imagined a new set of benefits such as easier roaming, family sharing, and new ways to try and buy games. We believe in the benefits of a connected, digital future.

 

Since unveiling our plans for Xbox One, my team and I have heard directly from many of you, read your comments and listened to your feedback. I would like to take the opportunity today to thank you for your assistance in helping us to reshape the future of Xbox One.

 

You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc. The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world.

 

So, today I am announcing the following changes to Xbox One and how you can play, share, lend, and resell your games exactly as you do today on Xbox 360. Here is what that means:

 

An internet connection will not be required to play offline Xbox One games – After a one-time system set-up with a new Xbox One, you can play any disc based game without ever connecting online again. There is no 24 hour connection requirement and you can take your Xbox One anywhere you want and play your games, just like on Xbox 360.

 

Trade-in, lend, resell, gift, and rent disc based games just like you do today – There will be no limitations to using and sharing games, it will work just as it does today on Xbox 360.

 

In addition to buying a disc from a retailer, you can also download games from Xbox Live on day of release. If you choose to download your games, you will be able to play them offline just like you do today. Xbox One games will be playable on any Xbox One console -- there will be no regional restrictions.

 

These changes will impact some of the scenarios we previously announced for Xbox One. The sharing of games will work as it does today, you will simply share the disc. Downloaded titles cannot be shared or resold. Also, similar to today, playing disc based games will require that the disc be in the tray.

 

We appreciate your passion, support and willingness to challenge the assumptions of digital licensing and connectivity. While we believe that the majority of people will play games online and access the cloud for both games and entertainment, we will give consumers the choice of both physical and digital content. We have listened and we have heard loud and clear from your feedback that you want the best of both worlds.

 

Thank you again for your candid feedback. Our team remains committed to listening, taking feedback and delivering a great product for you later this year."

Edited by TheMojorising

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Surprised at the u-turn, it's a total policy reversal. For me, it's almost enough to say I'd buy the console (I prefer the xbox controller) when such a time comes around.

 

That said, the DRM system has presumably already been developed, so there's little stopping them from rolling it out once the console has been accepted by the market.

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It's a very big 180 from the other day when they were claiming Sony was no competition at all for the coming generation. Now all they need to do is remove the Kinect and cut the price and they might claw back some consumers. They probably might as well rename it Pretendstation 4 at that point though...

 

I'm inclined to agree with TheFrunj, there's nothing stopping them forcing it upon people down the track. They've shown their hand and highlighted how they plan to force their product upon people in as many aspects of home entertainment as they possibly can and then charge the user for the right to use it. They won't be throwing that plan out the window after a week.

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faith in microsoft and the xBONE restored.

 

Im kinda surprised they did such a 180 and change something they put a large focus on

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Could happen, would be nice for the specs to be identical. Not sure what the article meant by speed of the RAM, it's a heck of a lot faster to preload stuff into RAM than try and load it off the HDD on the fly.

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I'll be buying a PS3 and Xbox 360 soon for this very reason

PS3 you dont need to rush for Sony aren't going to dump PS3 when PS4 gets here and there are a heap of games still in dev for it .

 

http://www.kotaku.com.au/2013/06/sony-wont...easing-the-ps4/

 

I will be keeping mine, bound to be some price drops on the AAA line up over time.

Edited by Waltish

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I bought a gen 2 PS3 brand new around a fortnight ago, as I preferred it over the current model. My housemate has a 360 he may give me at the end of the year so I'll wait and see how that pans out

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Could happen, would be nice for the specs to be identical. Not sure what the article meant by speed of the RAM, it's a heck of a lot faster to preload stuff into RAM than try and load it off the HDD on the fly.

 

Thinking about production , One would think that factories are already churning the machines out I mean both companies can expect initial sales in millions ,

if not already in prod they will have to start soon.

 

I suppose what I am getting at is that faffing about with the hardware now could be risky specially if there are glitches that need sorting.

Some probs in mfg could cause a catastrophic delay, and with this both out soon thing two weeks late could be catastrophic , even short supply would be problematic at best.

 

Not sure if changing hardware on this level would cause any probs for games in already in dev , suppose if the moves aren't too rad it would be trivial to adjust the game and the engine.

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As much as I know about the manufacturing side of things (which isn't huge), using higher capacity RAM chips instead of the lower capacity won't affect the assembly process at all, though it may cause supply issues. Bandwidth and interface would remain the same, and the programmers would simply have more working space to run games within; launch titles may use the 5GB of current specs (minus 3GB that the OS takes up), but later titles could simply expand to use the additional memory.

 

The tricky part with manufacturing would come from a change in memory type, for example swapping from GDDR3 (current) to GDDR5 (what the PS4 uses). This would require redesigning the PCB, totally different power management and delivery, new interface chips and so on. So if they rushed to do that, it might cause hiccups - though I don't think they will, given the hardware fiasco the 360 caused for its few years of RROD fun.

 

Devs have a hard time taking advantage of specialty interfaces, such as the eDRAM that came with the 360, or the high core count of the PS3 Cell processor. This is why neither of them were well utilised until much later in the console generation. Making the hardware more consistent and less specialised (i.e. more like a PC) is easier on the devs, imo.

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