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The 1000 terabyte DVD

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I'll bet asio and the NSA just creamed their collective pants.

 

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A new technique has been developed to enable the data capacity of a single DVD to increase from the current 4.7 gigabytes to an astonishing 1,000 terabytes -- the equivalent of 50,000 full high-definition movies.

 

So how did they manage to achieve such a huge boost in data storage? Along with Richard Evans, from CSIRO, they first explained the process in Nature Communications, along with a backgrounder on how data is stored on optical discs such as CDs and DVDs:

Details at the link.

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The two beams were then overlapped. As the second beam cancelled out the first in its donut ring, the recording process was tightly confined to the centre of the writing beam.

Donuts. Is there anything they can't do?

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Wait... so optical media may finally actually get somewhere again.

 

My reminiscent days of actually using my CD rack at home may be lived again.

 

Also now i want doughnuts.

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The two beams were then overlapped.

 

Thought you weren't allowed to cross the beams?

 

And a single scratch, the whole lot is unreadable...

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The two beams were then overlapped.

 

Thought you weren't allowed to cross the beams?

 

And a single scratch, the whole lot is unreadable...

 

Just make a new format with a cartridge?

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Just make a new format with a cartridge?

Something akin to ye olde 3.5" floppy? Yeah, I can see that working.

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Neat stuff! And developed by aussies to. Wonder if it'll ever reach mass market...

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Neat stuff! And developed by aussies to. Wonder if it'll ever reach mass market...

Off course it will.

 

As soon as it's sold for a pittance to an American company.

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But what would it be used for? It would have to have some seriously quick read/write to be relevant now, wouldn't it?

 

Like spyder alluded to, a single scratch and the whole thing is ruined. It's likely to have similar usable life to current dvds so tape drives would still be considered more durable as backup storage.

 

I suppose in 20 years when there is a new HD tv resolution that is mass market we could see some 1000 terrabyte movies...

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I was thinking about this and that we could get high quality lossless video and audio. The link doesn't work though.

 

404 Error - page not found

We're sorry, but the page you are looking for doesn't exist.

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Lossless video, lols.

 

I can see it being maybe somewhat useful for archiving in ye olde 80s/90s optical cartidges, maybe, but by the time this is marketable and affordable, I'm not sure how competitive it'll still be.

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Assuming the old hardware can read it with a firmware update (and maybe even write it); its a matter of creating a thin cartridge for the disk, and away we go.

 

Though thats wishful thinking.

 

LS120 superdisks came out pretty quick after 'discovery'. and even ZIP disks werent THAT far away (from discovery to release; they came before LS120\240); we can hope!

 

Lossless video, lols.

You're not far off are you? IIRC (and i might not, but I cant find a decent reference) but the ' first ever digital TV cameras' that were used at the Sydney Olympics, I think it was, used Panasonic 1TB cartridges didn't it?

If those can get significant time of 120FPS fast motion canera footage, 1000TB surely can hold some 'sensor to disk' stream dumps.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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Loss audio is only reproducing a lossy master, generally speaking.

 

So what's lossless video? Lossless encode of the master? Lossless capture from the camera's sensors, which I can't see being anything but massive amounts of RAW whose quality will vary depending on the camera?

 

'lossless video' is a meaningless phrase.

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"lossless video" is not a meaningless phrase, just as with lossless audio.

 

What is "Loss audio"?

 

What I am imagining is the same or greater bit depth as with Blu-ray with the same or greater FPS, lossless.

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Lossy audio is discarding things the psychoacoustic model says you can't hear, anyway, to save space.

 

What is lossless video?

 

What is lossy video?

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Okay; point taken. What I mean is the same or better bit depth, resolution and FPS as now with Blu-ray, lossless. Do you understand?

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The only real problem with bluray - outside of niche applications like large scale projection - is the bitrate. But even high bitrate h/x.264 is only needed for fast movement scenes, so I don't think it'd blow out the space required to petabyte levels.

 

I'm not sure what kind of extra space would be needed for 120fps playback, but I suspect it'd be far less than double.

 

Assuming 50gb for a premium blueray, doubling it for 120fps, and then x4 for 4k, that's still way way way under 1pb.

 

I don't know enough about imax standards to comment on how much space that would require

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"lossless video" is not a meaningless phrase, just as with lossless audio.

 

What is "Loss audio"?

 

What I am imagining is the same or greater bit depth as with Blu-ray with the same or greater FPS, lossless.

But, what is lossy video?

What are you discarding?

 

 

The only real problem with bluray - outside of niche applications like large scale projection - is the bitrate. But even high bitrate h/x.264 is only needed for fast movement scenes, so I don't think it'd blow out the space required to petabyte levels.

 

I'm not sure what kind of extra space would be needed for 120fps playback, but I suspect it'd be far less than double.

 

Assuming 50gb for a premium blueray, doubling it for 120fps, and then x4 for 4k, that's still way way way under 1pb.

 

I don't know enough about imax standards to comment on how much space that would require

I'd imagine a lot less Nich, since its still Cinema Reel technology and afaik the resolution wasnt increased, because reel scales so well.

What 1PB would give you is epic amounts of redundancy.

The same movie, 4 or 5 times on the one disk and an algorithm to 'read ahead' should it see a scratch.

 

Or Multi format. say 2GB of a 4.7GB dvd is sacrificed to a very compressed 480p MPEG2 (dvd) stream, then the DVD is finalised, the remaining 500GB or so then gets a 4k 120fps version, thats about 400GB, and the last 100GB goes to a PC digital DRM copy @h.264.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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