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And it's war......again.

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:)

 

Does not surprise me if the Hereford boys have sneaked in - it's more for recon, in a civil war you really do not know who is who and what to hit, if you decide to.

 

Sat photos are useless, need the Blackbirds back but rumour says some TR-1s and some Global Hawks are already moving into position.

 

Simply put need to know more, talk about fog of war....

 

Cheers

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Hmm,

 

Dunno of if Xnatex did but I sure did - flying in an fucking NBC suit is one major pain in the ass.

 

Cheers

LOL.

 

You want to try doing the gas hut.

 

Only CS gas at the back of the engineering school in lolsworthy, i missed out on the 1 in canada with IRR. There was this 1 dude in our platoon who was immune to the effects, could just talk normally without a mask on. He also had 3 balls so i dunno if its connected

 

gas gas gas

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Hmm,

 

I don't think the RAF even had a gas room, it was just expected that if ever there had been a Cold War escalation that we'd be flying through muck, not so much airborne, you can just stay on oxy even at low level but the skin contact stuff, and radiation of course, which you cannot exactly train for...

 

I guess we were all a bit fatalistic about it at the time, go hit them, expect to get in deep shit.

 

Then we slowly came to realise just what a sham it was we were facing, the USSR could never have really followed through on any invasion of Europe, shit equipment and maintenance and pretty appalling morale.

 

Funnily enough I know a couple of fireys who talk about doing smoke room training, sounds similar.

 

Cheers

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The RAAF only get to fly around 4 hours a week on average. Not enough recruits as they'd like.

 

This is why the yanks will be our air force for any offensive/defensive role particularly in SEA. In return we have to do as they say from coalition support right down to Julian Assange

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Yeah, you really can't stay proficient at that low a flying rate - I was RAF, and a long time ago, around 12 hours a week was the minimum, depending on what tour really.

 

USAF is pretty similar, you need it, or you lose the edge.

 

Cheers

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Guest xyzzy frobozz

Funnily enough I know a couple of fireys who talk about doing smoke room training, sounds similar.

Well.

 

Allow me to relate my experience.

 

We did the gas hut. You had to get into your NBC suit and wait outside of the hut. When your turn came up you had to run into the hut with your mask off, call "Gas, gas, gas!" pull your mask on, clear it and stay in the room for one minute. This was so that we learnt to clear the mask of any gas which you do my letting out a big puff from your lungs before breathing in - easier said than done.

 

Now let me tell you from experience - CS gas is fucking horrible. It gets into your eyes and nose, so that by the time you have cleared the mask you're already in a world of hurt, coughing and spluttering. Now I don't know if my NBC suit was fucked, but it also got into every "moist" area of my body, so that my eyes, ears, throat and nose, along with my crotch and armpits and my..... bell end, all stung like crazy. Although I was pretty well sealed up I couldn't wait until my minute was up. As soon as the light came on I shot out of the other side of the hut like I'd been fired out of a cannon.

 

I got out of my mask and suit and went around to the front of the hut where everyone who had been through was allowed to sit down and try to wash the CS out of our eyes and ears with water bottles. Once you'd recovered you could watch the other fellas on their way in, and tell them how horrible it was and what a nightmare they were in for. Luckily I was one of the first guys through, because as the hut filled up with gas, the opening and closing of the door was letting some of the gas out. Good ol' LCPL McMaster, who was all nuts and thunder (I'll be sweet, won't hurt me) was called in and as the door opened gas billowed out. He was on a sprint, and as the gas hit him he stumbled, and whacked his head on the doorway, knocking himself out cold. He lay there for about 10 seconds, motionless until everyone worked out what was going on. So the fellas behind him had to recover him, except none of the dumb bastards thought to put their own masks on prior to getting him, and so there were four fellas trying to recover a "dead body" from a cloud of CS gas spluttering and falling everywhere with the RSM yelling "Get your fucking masks on you stupid cunts!" and standing well clear.

 

I reckon that us fellas watching didn't stop laughing for about 5 days.

Edited by xyzzy frobozz

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Ouch.

 

Nope, never asked to do anything like that, thank Christ, maybe flyboys do get it a bit easier :)

 

Mind you I did once have a bloody oxygen feed fail at 35,000 feet - we were trained to recognise hypoxia early signs, not exactly rocket science, but it's a long way down to breathable air from there and I was not waiting for a clearance.

 

Both me and my GiB were pretty breathless by the time we got down. didn't pass out, but really had to take it easy for a few minutes before landing. Phantoms, not the simplest beast to put on the ground.

 

A very unusual failure, scared the living daylights out of me, far too easy to lose consciousness and never wake up at that altitude.

 

Of course, idiot that I am as soon as I was out of fire range I lit a smoke, then had to sit on the tarmac for about five minutes....

 

Takes a while for tissue to re-oxygenate apparently, whereas nicotine hits you like a sledge hammer :)

 

Cheers

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Guest xyzzy frobozz

Ouch.

 

Nope, never asked to do anything like that, thank Christ, maybe flyboys do get it a bit easier :)

 

Mind you I did once have a bloody oxygen feed fail at 35,000 feet - we were trained to recognise hypoxia early signs, not exactly rocket science, but it's a long way down to breathable air from there and I was not waiting for a clearance.

 

Both me and my GiB were pretty breathless by the time we got down. didn't pass out, but really had to take it easy for a few minutes before landing. Phantoms, not the simplest beast to put on the ground.

 

A very unusual failure, scared the living daylights out of me, far too easy to lose consciousness and never wake up at that altitude.

 

Of course, idiot that I am as soon as I was out of fire range I lit a smoke, then had to sit on the tarmac for about five minutes....

 

Takes a while for tissue to re-oxygenate apparently, whereas nicotine hits you like a sledge hammer :)

 

Cheers

I was going to say - what RAF plane had a GiB? Other than Tornado I couldn't think of any, but forgot Phantom.

 

I seem to recall you saying you were a classic Maple Fairway Prison despot...?

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I'm, um, not young mate, no, not too many two seaters around in my time, I missed both the Javelin (thank God) and being I was always on fighters the Canberra.

 

I did actually love the Phantom, but mainly because of the guy I had in back, I just always preferred single-seaters but Brian was special. Been dead a long, long time, hit a hill in then West Germany.

 

You had me puzzled there for a second - you mean 76 Squadron?

 

Well, no, my most involvement with the Mirage was in Israel, although I did conversion training on that beautiful aircraft with the French on an exchange. Loved that lady but never flew for the RAAF, just they were around in Darwin when I lived there, they even crashed one in the harbour, with no loss of life, so the penny dropped.

 

Long stories and again a few are back in the archives.

 

I did one last, incredibly nostalgic flight in a Mirage on their retirement that included a fly-by with some guys from 76. It was the the last time, for most of us so far as I know. The crew chiefs were more worried than we were, anything over a couple of G and they were liable to have wings clapping hands over your head. :)

 

Such a beautiful aircraft, and it still is really, Dassault just keep reinventing it :)

 

Stop making me feel old :)

 

Cheers

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Guest xyzzy frobozz

You had me puzzled there for a second - you mean 76 Squadron?

First word of callsigns for each RAAF Fighter Squadron:

 

Classic - 75 Sqn

Fairway - 76 Sqn

Prison - 3 Sqn

Despot - 77 Sqn

Maple - 2 OCU

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:)

 

Having never really had much to do with the RAAF I did not know that - Interesting :)

 

I've never known a pilot that did not absolutely love the Mirage, so beautiful, bit of a messy cockpit lay-out but that's hardly unusual, sort of like an Alfa :)

 

Cheers

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Don’t forget

 

“Aunt Sweeties” 33 Sqn

“Fatties” 88 Sqn

“Austrian peacocks” 14 Sqn

“Boy Hunters” 34 Sqn

“All hail the new flesh” 4 Sqn

And the grand old

“Noddy Dumps” 45 Sqn

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I should see if I can find my dad's "Shields". I don't know the proper names for them, but the wooden plaques you get with the squadron information on them. He has a few.

Only one I remember is the one he did active service with:

2 Sqn (Piping Shrike. Also called 'the magpies')

 

I do know he served in 10 sqn doing sub hunting (Navigator in Orions)

 

I know he navigated in:

Orions

Canberras

 

Pretty sure he was also in:

Hercs

 

Anything else, I'm not sure of.

 

He left flying JUST as the F111's were coming into being. Got promoted to flying a desk.

 

AD

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:)

 

I do have to admit AD, that sort of promotion was breathing down my neck and one of many reasons why I left.

 

Orions? Do not think you have mentioned that before. I'm pretty much immune to airsickness but a couple of rides with the Orions out of Edinburgh, years ago now, had me wondering - utter fucking nutcases :)

 

Cheers

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Orions. Engines with a plane attached. One of the few aircraft that could power itself out of a stall. Literally. Just don't rely on it. Planes don't like it if the engines detach from the wings.

 

AD

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Guest xyzzy frobozz

Orions. Engines with a plane attached. One of the few aircraft that could power itself out of a stall. Literally. Just don't rely on it. Planes don't like it if the engines detach from the wings.

 

AD

BAC Lightning was engines with a plane attached. I bet Chris can give us some good stories on that bird!

 

Posted Image

Edited by xyzzy frobozz

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:)

 

61 now mate, and yes, even sort of can scratch my head and maybe recall the name of the pilot of that lightning although it happened before I joined, very old event, quite famous photo, it's a P3 I think, can tell from the fin. They were English Electric then, flew many hours on that scarey beast, loved it actually, but it was no Mirage :)

 

Cheers

 

Edit: Actually AD most modern jets, military ones, can deep-stall and power out, but you are dead right on the Orion , one of the few props with that power margin.

 

Scary thing, if your dad wants to talk about it is this: Was based on the Electra passenger aircraft, in those it was hidden in the Orion not, ever single one of them had/has spar cracks mid-section, happens in the first hours of flight, never spreads, weird, but long accepted, sort of a settling in of the airframe. not my kind of airplane really but geez do those pilots chuck them around :)

Edited by chrisg

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Potential worldwide loss of oil supply.

 

Link

 

Basically there's a an oil shortage since the yanks killed Gaddafi (by proxy) and turned the country over to the Islamotards, this has kept oil prices high and a further clusterfuck in Syria will really bend things out of shape.

 

Bank of America says the “global shortfall” in oil has reached 4m b/d and leaves the world extremely vulnerable to a supply crunch if any missile strike in Syria goes wrong.

 

The bank said the most likely outcome would be a “short-lived spike” to between $120 and $130 provided the Nato operation is limited to a few days. The bank said a “protracted Vietnam-style boots-on-the-ground proxy war” could lead to a $50 jump, pushing Brent crude to $160.

 

The warning follows a disturbing report by Societe Generale’s Michael Wittner, a former oil analyst for the US Central Intelligence Agency and an expert on geo-strategic issues.

 

Mr Wittner predicted a rise in oil prices to $150 if the missile strikes lead a regional spillover, citing retaliatory attacks by Iran on Iraqi oil supply lines as the chief risk. Conflict between Iraqi Sunnis and Shiites has returned to levels last seen in 2008.

 

“Our big worry is Iraq,” he said. The country’s northern pipeline from Kirkuk to Turkey has been attacked repeatedly over the past three months, cutting exports by 40pc. Mr Wittner said the danger is that the attacks will move south to the Basrah port complex that supplies 2m b/d, this time orchestrated by Iranian proxies.

 

“Iraq is close to civil war,” said Jardine’s Dr Stephens. “Pipelines keep being blown up by al-Qaeda and Sunni militants – it is never quite clear – and this is a huge impediment. On top of this there is still no hydrocarbon law and no legal framework for contracts because they can’t agree on how to carve up the pie.”

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Hmm,

 

D.... That does not quite add up. Neither Libya nor Syria are oil producing nations, Iraq ,yes, but not as much as the rest of the region, including Saudi - sounds like profiteering/scare-mongering to me.

 

Other producers can pick up the slack, and probably should, take that bully tactic away from OPEC and its massive Arab influence, we can be self-sufficient without much effort now, Russia and the old states have plenty, time to tell them to fuck off with their oil blackmail.

 

Cheers

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Hmm,

 

D.... That does not quite add up. Neither Libya nor Syria are oil producing nations,

 

Cheers

 

Wut?

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_reserves_in_Libya

 

Oil reserves in Libya are the largest in Africa and the fifth largest[citation needed] in the world with 76.4 billion barrels (12.15×109 m3) as of 2010. Oil production was 3.1 million barrels per day (490×103 m3/d) as of 2010, giving Libya 77 years of reserves at current production rates if no new reserves were to be found.[1] Libya is considered a highly attractive oil area due to its low cost of oil production (as low as $1 per barrel at some fields), and proximity to European markets. Libya's challenge is maintaining production at mature fields, while finding and developing new oil fields. Most of Libya remains unexplored as a result of past sanctions and disagreements with foreign oil companies.[2]

 

The majority (85%) of Libyan oil is exported to European markets.[3] 11% or 403 million barrels (64.1×106 m3) of oil imports to the European union in 2010 came from Libya, making it the third biggest importer behind Norway and Russia.[4]

 

Cumulative production through 2009 was 27 Gbbl.[5] Given the stated number, this would be 65% of reserves.

 

The drilling of oil wells in Libya was first authorised by the Petroleum Law of 1955.[6] The National Oil Corporation is the largest oil company of Libya .

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economy_of_Syria#Oil

 

Syria is the only significant crude oil producing country in the Eastern Mediterranean region, which includes Jordan, Lebanon, Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza. According to the Oil and Gas Journal, Syria had 2,500,000,000 barrels (400,000,000 m3) of petroleum reserves as of 1 January 2010.[32] Syria's known oil reserves are mainly in the eastern part of the country in the Deir ez-Zor Governorate near its border with Iraq and along the Euphrates River; a number of smaller fields are located in the center of the country.[33] In 2010, Syria produced around 385,000 barrels (61,200 m3) per day of crude oil.[30][31] Oil production has stabilized after falling for a number of years, and is poised to turn around as new fields come on line. In 2008, Syria produced 187 billion cubic feet (5.3×109 m3) of natural gas, and two years later in 2010, it increased production to 275×109 cu ft (7.8×109 m3).[34] While much of its oil is exported to Europe, Syria's natural gas is used in reinjection for enhanced oil recovery and for domestic electricity generation.[32]...

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And there you have it. Pretty powerful if it checks out.

 

Link

 

Syrian rebels in the Damascus suburb of Ghouta have admitted to Associated Press correspondent Dale Gavlak that they were responsible for last week’s chemical weapons incident which western powers have blamed on Bashar Al-Assad’s forces, revealing that the casualties were the result of an accident caused by rebels mishandling chemical weapons provided to them by Saudi Arabia. “From numerous interviews with doctors, Ghouta residents, rebel fighters and their families….many believe that certain rebels received chemical weapons via the Saudi intelligence chief, Prince Bandar bin Sultan, and were responsible for carrying out the (deadly) gas attack,” writes Gavlak. (back up version here).

 

Rebels told Gavlak that they were not properly trained on how to handle the chemical weapons or even told what they were. It appears as though the weapons were initially supposed to be given to the Al-Qaeda offshoot Jabhat al-Nusra.

 

“We were very curious about these arms. And unfortunately, some of the fighters handled the weapons improperly and set off the explosions,” one militant named ‘J’ told Gavlak.

 

His claims are echoed by another female fighter named ‘K’, who told Gavlak, “They didn’t tell us what these arms were or how to use them. We didn’t know they were chemical weapons. We never imagined they were chemical weapons.”

 

Abu Abdel-Moneim, the father of an opposition rebel, also told Gavlak, “My son came to me two weeks ago asking what I thought the weapons were that he had been asked to carry,” describing them as having a “tube-like structure” while others were like a “huge gas bottle.” The father names the Saudi militant who provided the weapons as Abu Ayesha.

 

According to Abdel-Moneim, the weapons exploded inside a tunnel, killing 12 rebels.

 

“More than a dozen rebels interviewed reported that their salaries came from the Saudi government,” writes Gavlak.

 

If accurate, this story could completely derail the United States’ rush to attack Syria which has been founded on the “undeniable” justification that Assad was behind the chemical weapons attack. Dale Gavlak’s credibility is very impressive. He has been a Middle East correspondent for the Associated Press for two decades and has also worked for National Public Radio (NPR) and written articles for BBC News.

 

The website on which the story originally appeared - Mint Press (which is currently down as a result of huge traffic it is attracting to the article) is a legitimate media organization based in Minnesota. The Minnesota Post did a profile on them last year.

 

Saudi Arabia’s alleged role in providing rebels, whom they have vehemently backed at every turn, with chemical weapons, is no surprise given the revelations earlier this week that the Saudis threatened Russia with terror attacks at next year’s Winter Olympics in Sochi unless they abandoned support for the Syrian President.

 

“I can give you a guarantee to protect the Winter Olympics next year. The Chechen groups that threaten the security of the games are controlled by us,” Prince Bandar allegedly told Vladimir Putin, the Telegraph reports.

 

The Obama administration is set to present its intelligence findings today in an effort prove that Assad’s forces were behind last week’s attack, despite American officials admitting to the New York Times that there is no “smoking gun” that directly links President Assad to the attack.

 

US intelligence officials also told the Associated Press that the intelligence proving Assad’s culpability is “no slam dunk.”

 

As we reported earlier this week, intercepted intelligence revealed that the Syrian Defense Ministry was making “panicked” phone calls to Syria’s chemical weapons department demanding answers in the hours after the attack, suggesting that it was not ordered by Assad’s forces.

 

UPDATE: Associated Press contacted us to confirm that Dave Gavlak is an AP correspondent, but that her story was not published under the banner of the Associated Press. We didn’t claim this was the case, we merely pointed to Gavlak’s credentials to stress that she is a credible source, being not only an AP correspondent, but also having written for PBS, BBC and Salon.com.

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I did not explain myself at all well, it was some odd time and moving house is bloody exhausting - yes, I know they have oil, I used to fly supplies out to the Libyan rigs, but in relative terms it is not much and they do not I believe deal with America at all. Also I think that first wiki article is suspect - took a long time to hit oil in Libya, Nigeria has far more.

 

I suppose that if their supply has stopped that has some flow on effect, but they are not the producers that the gulf states are.

 

It just seems manipulative, Bank of America up to its usual tricks ?

 

I'm really not surprised that it may be the rebels who fucked up with CBWs, the claim they came from Saudi does, they have no official programme at all.

 

Cheers

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