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nobody813

Intel Ivy Bridge-E

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In what has taken Intel quite some time, the LGA2011 socket has finally been refreshed with the introduction of the Ivy Bridge-E CPU's. Here are some reviews for various chips:

- Intel Core i7 4960X (Ivy Bridge E) Review (AnandTech)

- Core i7 4820K Review and Core i7 4960X Review (Guru3D)

- Intel Core i7-4960X Review: Ivy Bridge-E, Benchmarked (Tom's Hardware)

 

So what does everyone think? How do you feel this fits in with the mainstream platform (LGA1150) considering that is already a generation ahead (Haswell)? Would also be interesting to see if anyone with a Sandy Bridge-E system considers this a worthy upgrade

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I think the people who traditionally straddle the mainstream/enthusiast line with opt for haswell, or what till the next HEDT platform drops with DDR4

 

personally, ill be getting the 4930k in the next month or so; depending on how long new boards come to market with IVB-E support out of the box... ie not requiring a bios upgrade with a sb-e cpu first, Its a nice upgrade for my use case, the power reduction at load alone; is more then enough reason for me to jump to it. besides gaming, i do a fair amount of video transcoding and full dvd/blu-ray authoring with menus in a open source windows app (because i refuse to pay for DRM+bloatware heavy faster apps with horrible UI's that slow me down), the app i use doesn't benefit at all from hyper-threading in my experience (the fps gain on the HT core = fps loss on the real core), but responds nicely to core count + memory bandwidth.

 

Feature wise; the X79 PCH vs z87 for my use case has nothing going in the z87 favor. I use a single ssd on sata 6gb/s port, and 2 mechanical storage drives + BR/dvd burner on the older sata ports, this config wont change in the forseeable future, i have another pc acting as a NAS for larger storage needs. And I dont use usb3 devices either, so no real reason for me to choose haswell over IVB-E.

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Its good with some minor improvements. But no need to upgrade for the casual users with decent hardware already

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Intel Core i7 4960X Extreme Edition, Core i7 4930K and Core i7 4820K are now available at PCCG

They are... I was waiting for them, but they are super expensive - $100 more than the previous generation. This seems be be consistant across the usual places I look - MSY, CPL, etc. In the US they are a bit more but not this much. Is the AUD$ exchange rate bad?

 

In what has taken Intel quite some time, the LGA2011 socket has finally been refreshed with the introduction of the Ivy Bridge-E CPU's. Here are some reviews for various chips:

- Intel Core i7 4960X (Ivy Bridge E) Review (AnandTech)

- Core i7 4820K Review and Core i7 4960X Review (Guru3D)

- Intel Core i7-4960X Review: Ivy Bridge-E, Benchmarked (Tom's Hardware)

 

So what does everyone think? How do you feel this fits in with the mainstream platform (LGA1150) considering that is already a generation ahead (Haswell)? Would also be interesting to see if anyone with a Sandy Bridge-E system considers this a worthy upgrade

I wanted to upgrade to Ivy-E so I get a bit of future proofing , but in this case there is little surety around future proofing. PCI-E Sata and DDR4 are just around the corner as is maybe a new socket for Haswell-E, and I dont want to get stuck at the end of a generation with these new improvements coming, as I was with my Q9650 on DDR2 (though in truth it is still more than good enough). Now they are talking about a mid-cycle Haswell 1150 refresh... Now more than ever it is difficult to commit to an upgrade when your platform looks to have such a short lifespan (1 year) and almost certain to be orphaned. I'm now of the mind to get someones 1155 based system cheapish off ebay to tide me over without spending big $$$ and wait for the next generation of motherboard at the very least on Haswell.

Edited by Alien666

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Alien666. You will be waiting at least a year if not 18 months for Haswell E to be released. In truth though, waiting for the next big thing to come out doesn't really help future proofing either considering the life span of a particular build. Take my previous build which was a Q6600, purchased and built in 2006, which I only upgraded last year to one of the SB-E SKUs. If you look at the performance increases, most between 10-30% increase between product lines, you would say "great". However, in real life terms, you don't really see the performance increase at all, unless you do something that requires the cores in the first place.

 

I dabble in 3D animation as much as I can. Technically speaking, even a 6 core CPU like the one in my sig, I got a 40% increase in performance but in reality it still took almost as many hours as opposed to my previous CPU (eg 100 minutes in comparison 120 minutes). I progressively upgraded my Q6600 system over the years to give me better and better performance. Perhaps the biggest leap in performance that I have seen came from the installation of an SSD.

 

Ultimately, what is it that you have in mind? Considering that Haswell was initially slated to have 8 cores I was planning to await for Haswell too. However, that changed and I changed my plans as well.

Edited by strifus

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Alien666. You will be waiting at least a year if not 18 months for Haswell E to be released. In truth though, waiting for the next big thing to come out doesn't really help future proofing either considering the life span of a particular build. Take my previous build which was a Q6600, purchased and built in 2006, which I only upgraded last year to one of the SB-E SKUs. If you look at the performance increases, most between 10-30% increase between product lines, you would say "great". However, in real life terms, you don't really see the performance increase at all, unless you do something that requires the cores in the first place.

 

I dabble in 3D animation as much as I can. Technically speaking, even a 6 core CPU like the one in my sig, I got a 40% increase in performance but in reality it still took almost as many hours as opposed to my previous CPU (eg 100 minutes in comparison 120 minutes). I progressively upgraded my Q6600 system over the years to give me better and better performance. Perhaps the biggest leap in performance that I have seen came from the installation of an SSD.

 

Ultimately, what is it that you have in mind? Considering that Haswell was initially slated to have 8 cores I was planning to await for Haswell too. However, that changed and I changed my plans as well.

Sorry for the long wait on reply, went away over school holidays!

 

Basically I looked at a bunch of options then decided to build a mini server. The main issue/problem/challenge is that I wanted to use my 27" iMac as the screen (toggling between the mac and server) rather than go back to using my 24" Samsung 1900x1200, which now looks fairly average compared to the iMac screen, which is glorious. My iMac only has thunderbolt, not display port so I need to use a thunderbolt motherboard. Also the Server needs to be small (to get partner approval) and due to space constraints.

 

I ended up getting a Gigabyte GA-Z77MX-D3H TH off ebay cheap. Then bought a 3770K, 32GB of 2133 Kingston Beast ram, a Noctua 12U Slim (agonised over water-cooling but I need it to be silent or as quiet as possible), and a bitfenix Prodigy M in White. My Samsung 500GB SSD, velociraptor, 2 WD Blacks will go into this. I'm still putting it together, but it will be a quarter to size of my original rig and fits in (being white). I agonised over this - I couldnt find (to purchase) a Z87 Thunderbolt motherboard in M-ATX.

 

This probably seems stupid given 1155 is done with, but I really wanted a small machine for the partner approval factor and to use the iMac screen. I dont think I'll notice the difference to a 4770k and hope the faster ram and SSD and a decent overclock will make up for it. Also the MB comes with Virtu, so when I get a new GPU I hope it will work to output the discrete GPU signal via the Virtu s/w thru the thunderbolt cable. Its been done before but of course who knows if it will work in the end. The idea is that 99% of the time the server will run VM's I need because of my job, and Windows software I would rather run native than under VMWare on the mac and act as a media server (my NAS experience has put me off NAS's for now). Then when Star Citizen comes out, I will use it to game. I now just need to find a good GPU to run at 2560x1440.

 

Maybe when Haswell v2 comes out, someone will bring out a M-ATX motherboard with TB, PCI-E SATA, DDR4, etc and I might refresh it all again. I am finding that with ebay I can get a large percentage of my money back and tax deductions/depreciation covers the rest.

 

Ideally I might have moved house by then and I can go back to a full or mid tower, and Haswell-E .... or if I can afford it a E5 Xeon.

 

My strategy with my old Core 2 rig was the same as yours, constant small upgrades. I think though now that I'm a bit more cashed up, I'll buy the machine I need now and then upgrade in 14-16 months again. Maybe hand down the current rig to someone in the family.

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