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fajw

Which operating system should I use?

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I don't want to use Windows or Mac OS on my PC and I want something secure and functional. I don't really play games so that is not much of an issue. Mainly I use my PC for communication. I don't know where to start. Any suggestions?

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This isn't really a recommendation, as until a few hours ago I knew nothing about Linux versions, however I've only just this afternoon installed Lubuntu 13.04 onto an old Atom netbook to try and squeeze some more life out of it, and so far it is amazingly faster. The internet tells me it's about the lightest Ubuntu based build available (using 100MB RAM sitting on the desktop), it's got a pretty familiar GUI if you're used to Windows like me, was easy to install, and it comes packaged with everything you need to get started, including Pidgin for communication and Chromium for the net.

 

It's certainly basic, but for my needs it seems great so far, and if you're only using it for communication, it might be all that you need.

 

http://lubuntu.net/

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I like crunchbang linux which is openbox on top of debian, running it on my eeepc - for you thought i would suggest something like linux mint or ubuntu, both pretty user friendly.

do you have any pre-requisites other than not windows or mac?

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Thanks for the replies.

 

Richard Stallman told me to not use Ubuntu because of adware/spyware.

Edited by fajw

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not true. There is one piece of spyware (that word is only technically correct, not in the way we'd normally use the word, meaning personal data theft), and that is a tool that searches amazon when you use the search tool; just remove it. Its spyware because Amazon gets a search from your IP.

Ubuntu Lubuntu, or my favorite Xubuntu, will get you both the most online support, an easy to use interface, and the widest range of software.

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What's the advantage of using 12.04.3 over using the latest?

Edited by fajw

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What's the advantage of using 12.04.3 over using the latest?

It's the latest LTS or "super stable" release. .3 came out last month

 

Lubuntu doesn't have an LTS yet, if you use it use 13.04. (If it's a mac, use the in-developement 13.10)

Edited by noskcaj

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Linux Mint is also well worth a look for a new Linux user.

If you need the multimedia working out of the box it might be just what you need.

 

As for Ubuntu 12.04.3, it's is a Long Term Release if I'm not mistaken. Much longer official support.

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I like crunchbang linux which is openbox on top of debian, running it on my eeepc - for you thought i would suggest something like linux mint or ubuntu, both pretty user friendly.

do you have any pre-requisites other than not windows or mac?

Crunchbang looks interesting and very light. What's the installation process like? Lubuntu was as easy or easier than any Windows install I've done.

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Thanks for the replies.

 

Richard Stallman told me to not use Ubuntu because of adware/spyware.

if you're talking with Richard Stallman maybe ask him what he would recommend while you're at it?

 

I like crunchbang linux which is openbox on top of debian, running it on my eeepc - for you thought i would suggest something like linux mint or ubuntu, both pretty user friendly.

do you have any pre-requisites other than not windows or mac?

Crunchbang looks interesting and very light. What's the installation process like? Lubuntu was as easy or easier than any Windows install I've done.

 

its debian based like ubuntu, will be almost identical process. i like it because i don't have to use the touchpad to do anything, and it's quick to boot and snappy even on a netbook.

takes about 5 mins to install from usb. i prefer it to lubuntu which is a bit bland.

 

it's also extremely customisable\tweakable.

 

edit: should also mention steam works fine on crunchbang, was playing FTL on my eeepc before, had to workaround not meeting the minimum res (im limited to 1024x600 and it needs 1280x720) but you can do it on linux, not on windows ;)

I have some custom config files for conky and tint2 if you want to give it a go, feel free to pm me so we don't derail this further.

Edited by p0is0n

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Have you considered using freeBSD?

 

If your PC contains hardware that requires proprietary drivers (like most dell machines, for example), then I suggest you save yourself the hassle and use ubuntu. I've not known any other open source OS to deal well with such devices.

 

If your PC does not contain such hardware, my experience is that freeBSD is considerably less likely to eat itself and require reinstallation on a regular basis that any linux distribution.

Edited by Sir_Substance

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Have you considered using freeBSD?

 

If your PC contains hardware that requires proprietary drivers (like most dell machines, for example), then I suggest you save yourself the hassle and use ubuntu. I've not known any other open source OS to deal well with such devices.

 

If your PC does not contain such hardware, my experience is that freeBSD is considerably less likely to eat itself and require reinstallation on a regular basis that any linux distribution.

+1, although expect to have a "learning experience" if you need a driver on BSD.

 

Richard Stallman told me to not use Ubuntu because of adware/spyware.

Richard Stallman is a nutjob.

 

+1

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Richard Stallman started the GNU project that provided all the fundamental parts required to create GNU/Linux (userland tools, compiler, editor). The article linked above basically reports that he disagrees with the bringing of DRM encumbered proprietary software to an operating system that was born out of a desire for all users to be free view, edit, modify and learn from the source code.

 

How somebody who has stuck to their principals and undoubtedly provided a huge contribution to human kind through the GNU project can even be remotely compared to somebody who promotes the picketing to funerals and peddling of bigotry is just absurd. Weather you agree with his philosophy or not, the project he started has inspired and provided the platform for many many more, projects which are used by and affect million of people every day.

 

To the op, if you are new to GNU/Linux one of the major projects (Ubuntu/Mint etc) would be a good start, there is a large and active user base and a lot of help and resources available.

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The article linked above basically reports that he disagrees with the bringing of DRM encumbered proprietary software to an operating system that was born out of a desire for all users to be free view, edit, modify and learn from the source code.

Not that he simply disagrees, but that he believes it's "unethical".

 

How somebody who has stuck to their principals and undoubtedly provided a huge contribution to human kind through the GNU project can even be remotely compared to somebody who promotes the picketing to funerals and peddling of bigotry is just absurd.

It's more that he refers to closed-source software as "unethical", in a similar way to how Fred Phelps refers to homosexuality as "immoral".

 

"It's not what I like, therefore it is objectively wrong!"

Edited by SquallStrife

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I think it's probably a bit extreme to compare Stallman to Phelps, but when people say he's nutty, they aren't kidding. He's been

.

 

I think his issue is that he has been so apart from the way the rest of society functions for so long that he's forgotten that it's possible and sometimes (although not always) worthwhile to compromise. Steam on linux has popularized the platform significantly, and steamOS will be interesting to watch.

 

Not using credit cards or mobile phones, calling steam on linux unethical and eating things off his feet are all symptoms of a man who doesn't *quite* live in the same world as you or me. I have boundless respect for the guys work, integrity and force of will in holding the line, but he's definitely off his rocker.

Edited by Sir_Substance

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I think it's probably a bit extreme to compare Stallman to Phelps, but when people say he's nutty, they aren't kidding. He's been

.

 

I think his issue is that he has been so apart from the way the rest of society functions for so long that he's forgotten that it's possible and sometimes (although not always) worthwhile to compromise. Steam on linux has popularized the platform significantly, and steamOS will be interesting to watch.

 

Not using credit cards or mobile phones, calling steam on linux unethical and eating things off his feet are all symptoms of a man who doesn't *quite* live in the same world as you or me. I have boundless respect for the guys work, integrity and force of will in holding the line, but he's definitely off his rocker.

That's what I was trying to get at. :)

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I'm a major Debian fan, i use it for absolutely everything I can, but it doens't work too well with my current laptop and desktop hardware as most of it is only a year old. Ubuntu however, works extremely well with newer hardware and multiple screens.

 

My vote goes to Ubuntu 13.04 for a desktop.

 

*13.10 :)

Edited by smakme7757

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Which is the easiest to use?

 

It also needs to be able to be installed on a CPU that does not do PAE.

 

And the machine has only 512MB RAM.

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Easy to use and only 512MB RAM - Crunchbang Linux would be my choice.

Crunchbang is based on a slim Debian install and uses the lightweight Openbox window manager instead of one of the more bloated, mainstream desktop environments.

 

FYI I'm running and Openbox/Arch linux install on my 1GB RAM Atom netbook and am very happy with the responsiveness.

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the pae bit is the issue here. Is it fake pae or no pae?

Edited by noskcaj

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