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drago13666

A Commentary on Piracy

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It sounds to me like most of us would use a Netflix service if it was available to us, and identical to the American version. Most Americans seem to use it just out of convenience. I would use it, knowing I can effortlessly plug in whatever I'm looking for and start watching all of it then and there. No need to mess around with torrents and what have you, even though that usually is a simple process. And for stuff that isn't on Netflix (though it sounds pretty comprehensive), there's always good old piracy to fall back on.

 

I remember going to netflix.com years ago only for it to tell me it's not available here. It still has an identical page now. I'm guessing we don't have access to it because the rights for shows and movies are blockaded by the likes of Foxtel. The same reason you can't watch a Colbert Report clip on the official website, instead being forced to go to the unbelievably ugly Comedy Channel .au website for some shitty old clips.

 

Re: digital price gouging, Steam can be pretty bad. iTunes doesn't seem too bad. I just compared the final Breaking Bad season on US iTunes site here and the local version in the iTunes program. US price is $22.99US for the season. AUS price is $24.99. Not sure if that's AUD or not, but assuming it is, the US price equals $24.50AUD, just 50 cents off.

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itunes store suffers the same problem that steam does: rights holders/publishers aren't in it to make it convenient, they're in it to make money, and as far as they're concerned Australia's higher wages means higher profits. Or, exclusives get made that bypass online distribution, eg Foxtel making sure you need a sub package to see GoT locally, legitimately.

This sort of regional discrimination gets me all up in arms.

Many publishers on steam still practice it despite there being no justification for it.

 

$90 for a game I can buy from elsewhere for $45 is just ridiculous. $50 - 60 is insta buy for a AAA game >$70 makes me look for alternatives.

Is it really? Which market is the baseline? Why pay AUD when you can pay USD? Why buy from the US storefront when it's cheaper in Russia/China/India?

 

Pretend you're the one living in India, or even that the exchange rate on the AUD just dived massively. Do you want to suddenly be paying the AU storefront price with an extra 20-40 on top of the US storefront price, or do you want to be paying double the US price?

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I'm not afraid to say that I will pretty much just download whatever I want, the thought of going out to buy a blu-ray or dvd just never crosses my mind. I don't think it's worth it. They are overpriced, it's a pain in the ass to find the disk, get up, put it in, deal with previews, navigate some shitty menu etc. then if I want to watch something else next, or the next disk in the series for tv shows, got to get up, change disks again. Somehow they think 3-4 episodes per disk is reasonable. I also need something additional to play it, like a ps3 for blu rays or a separate blue ray player, or a htpc. I watch everything on either a raspberry pi or an android stick both of which cost about $50 or less and play any format, and also perform other duties. With digital media, I can quickly watch anything I want. If something new comes out, I have it automatically download and rename, put in the right folder and ready to watch within hours. It's just so much more convenient.

 

I don't even watch TV, there is no antenna connected to my LCD screen. I hate the ads, I don't want to have to be there at a certain time, if I get up, am I going to miss something? It's not convenient either.

 

I would never pay $40-60 for a blu ray I might only watch once, when I could pay $0 for a 1080p rip, get it quicker (often while it's still showing at the cinema, sometimes even before that) and enjoy it freely. If high quality content was available as a digital form eg. 1080p mkv with a variety of audio options and subtitles, available day 1, I'd pay maybe $5 to download it if it was something I wanted to see. I'd pay maybe $2-3 per episode for a TV show if the content was good too. It would have to be in an open format though, that I can store and watch however I please, and the download speed would have to be fast. I wouldn't want to have to browse and purchase individual episodes either, I want to just subscribe to things I like, and automate it entirely. No netflix, no itunes, no streaming, no thanks.

 

It's not about being stingy, I don't pirate any games although I used to in my youth, it's just easy enough to buy most games digitally and play them these days, especially because it's often not possible to play multiplayer with an illegal copy. It's just about convenience. Unless a legal service can offer what I want, when I want it, I'm not really interested. I subscribe to various news providers, and pay for VIP status on some sites if it will make things more convenient. If I could pay a monthly subscription to say HBO and add it as a provider to something like sickbeard to get all shows in the best quality immediately, I would do it. But it's not that simple. Instead of constantly submitting takedown requests to nzb sites, why don't studios start their own news provider service, and release their content legally for a monthly fee. It's called getting with the times.

 

I also don't like the attitude of the movie\tv studios and they way they enforce their demands on people, so I have very little desire to support these people and very little respect for the industry. For some people, grabbing a disk at jb hifi is easy enough and playing it is convenient for them. I never go to the shops, so it's not convenient for me. Downloading is. That's the main factor behind my piracy.

 

edit: I found out about another show I might want to watch tonight, cutthroat kitchen, as I was a big fan of good eats. No chance it is available anywhere but illegally. I can't go to the shops at 9pm no matter how badly I want it, even if it was available there, but I have all 8 available episodes an hour later and am about to watch the first one.

edit: turns out it's some kinda iron chef/master chef reality crap so it's deleted, no harm done, very little time wasted.

Edited by p0is0n

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itunes and Amazon's season passes fulfil your qualifications apart from open format. And yet you still don't pay for the service and download it elsewhere? Is the cost of a VPN to stream netflix or hulu to your devices not comparable to the cost of multiple usenet accounts?

 

I understand the reasons you gave, btw, it just ultimately comes across as, unlike multiplayer in games, there's not really anything that motivates you to pay for non-gaming content, because it will always be cheaper and more convenient to keep doing what you're doing.

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itunes and Amazon's season passes fulfil your qualifications apart from open format. And yet you still don't pay for the service and download it elsewhere? Is the cost of a VPN to stream netflix or hulu to your devices not comparable to the cost of multiple usenet accounts?

 

I understand the reasons you gave, btw, it just ultimately comes across as, unlike multiplayer in games, there's not really anything that motivates you to pay for non-gaming content, because it will always be cheaper and more convenient to keep doing what you're doing.

Primarily my connection speed is also an issue, 4.5mbit down and ~0.9mbit up so streaming kind of sucks, I prefer just direct download at whatever speed I can manage, or direct download at work on 300mbit connection, and then watch when convenient. This ultimately makes what I am doing the easiest and most convenient method.

I wouldn't ever pay for the service, just to give them money, and then download it elsewhere, it doesn't encourage them to improve their service at all. Once someone launches the right product/service, I think I will let me wallet do the talking then. I don't think it would be hard for entertainment companies to launch a newsgroup type service for their content, with a small monthly fee, and an api to add to sickbeard to make things dead easy for people like me who like to automate. That's one major inconvenience that things like itunes or amazon also doesn't address, having to actually manually keep up to date with everything your watching and keep downloading the new episodes. I haven't actually used it though, so I may be misinformed.

Edited by p0is0n

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Timely.

 

Link

 

Whilst we're looking at studies, another from the London School of Economics and Political Science has found that piracy may be helping the entertainment community, rather than hurting it. While the entertainment industry lobbyists continue to state that piracy is hurting the industry, it isn’t uncommon to hear that it is actually doing the opposite. Author Neil Gaiman for example, noticed that when he was pirated, sales of his books went up. After releasing his book “American Gods” for free and letting new readers discover him, his sales spiked by 300% the following month. LSE’s report suggests that indeed, the entertainment industry remains healthy, and piracy may even have some positive effects: The gaming industry is as profitable as it has ever been and the US film industry is breaking records. The report states that “Despite the Motion Picture Association of America’s (MPAA) claim that online piracy is devastating the movie industry, Hollywood achieved record-breaking global box office revenues of $35 billion in 2012, a 6% increase over 2011,” Indeed, the music industry is seeing good times too: “Contrary to the industry claims, the music industry is not in terminal decline, but still holding ground and showing healthy profits. Revenues from digital sales, subscription services, streaming and live performances compensate for the decline in revenues from the sale of CDs or records,” says Bart Cammaerts, one of the study’s authors.

Edited by Director

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