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Antraman

Bodgy CPU cooler - can I do this? (safely)

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In the middle of a PC build for my son...I wanna quickly test a HDD before I put everything together, but I don't want to detach the Scythe Infinity cooler off the older PC that my son is using now as it is a real PITA to disconnect and reconnect for a 10-20min boot up test ...so I am wondering if I can use a makeshift CPU cooler...

 

Its a metal milkshake flask, to be filled with about 750ml of water, resting on top of the CPU itself. It has a perfectly flat bottom, and rests perfectly on top of the CPU shroud. CPU is an AMD 6400 dual core.

 

Posted Image

 

At what point in the boot up process does the CPU start needing cooling? is it from the moment its turned on, or does POST not use the CPU, therefore not creating heat?

 

Enquiring minds wanna know :-)

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wow, very inovitive. would work ok until the water gets warm/hot id imagine. but thats about the extent of my cooling knowledge

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Consider that a CPU will easily hit 400C within a second without even a stock heatsink and you'll get some idea about the cooling efficiency of that system.

 

CPU needs cooling from the moment it draws current; ie. when you press the on button on your computer. From that point it will heat up really, really quickly.

 

The surface area of the cup itself will help matters though the cooling efficiency of this thing will fall dramatically as the water heats up.

 

Several seconds of use? Most likely. 10-20 minutes? I'd say not a chance. You're risking alot here. Make sure there is insane airflow around the side of the metal cup because once that water heats up it will be useless since you have no method of cooling it down. The idea of cooling something is to heat up a medium (air or water by a certain means) and then move that medium away from the heat source, cool it and in some cases, recycle that medium around (a water cooling loop won't work without a radiator). Your setup has the water sitting still. Once its thermal capacity is used it won't cool the CPU much as act as a kettle.

 

If you're crazy enough to go through with this, fill the cup with ice. At least you'll get some more time as the medium will be at a lower temperature to begin with.

Edited by r4nd0m

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Ah OK...400deg wow.

 

Doesn't the CPu or the motherboard have a built in overheat protection which will cause an automatic shutdown?

 

The ice idea sounds good. I can pull the plug if I see the ice cubes rapidly melting.

 

And another idea...if the CPU generates so much heat, maybe I could connect up my home's hotwater system to the CPU, so I am saving on heating expenses?

Edited by Antraman

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OK, got the PC going for...about 20 seconds, got it to POST then it powered down. Got some vid...will try to chuck it up on youtube.

 

I didn't get enough time for Windows to try and load up...so I'm still at square one.

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if you have a real CPU cooler, even if it isnt the right mounts or whatever, leave it on the side like that. put some paste on, and rest the cooler on there.

 

it'll get fucking hot, but maybe not as hot as to trigger the shutdown.

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dude thas not goin to work mabey a "little" if u had thermal paste but..... it would only take a few seconds to grab a stock heatsing and sit it on top THO that would last very long either...if u have one

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Hate to say I told you so. Its great though that modern CPUs have thermal diodes and other methods of saving themselves from thermal destruction.

 

I will say that you're pretty brave for even trying this.

 

If you put some proper TIM between the cup and the CPU it might work better.

 

Also with the ice you will get condensation on the cup. This may drip off the cup onto your motherboard shorting it out and potentially destroying it. Make sure you counter this if you try any further.

 

Regarding home heating? Hah, the CPU generates maybe what? 100W or so of heat. Thats enough to heat the heatspreader up to around 200-400 degrees but not your whole house. At the end of the day, a heatspreader is a small surface, your house is comparatively huge.

Edited by r4nd0m

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dude thas not goin to work mabey a "little" if u had thermal paste but..... it would only take a few seconds to grab a stock heatsing and sit it on top THO that would last very long either...if u have one

used paste on that...but no, I had no spare coolers. that was the whole reason I tried this.

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well u wouldnt happen to have maybe an old GPU hsf? or even a large chipset cooler with a fan retrofitted? that would work better

 

 

and if not try water in the cup as well as ice..it will work better

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As I said, not heatsinks were around unfortunately...woulda tried it if I had.

 

I had a 3rd of water in the bottom of the cup, and the ice filled to 3/4.

 

At the end of the day, a heatspreader is a small surface, your house is comparatively huge.

 

Well, I'll just have to get some more PC's then...:-)

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o ok... maybe a little water more contact with the cup. the ice is only to cool the water, the water to cool the cup

Edited by weredragon

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Wow.. First time I've ever heard of this being attempted..

Personally I will say this...

Do not pass go, do not collect $200... Stop what you are doing right now...

Where are you located?? Personally I would find a decent PC shop, buy a half decent cpu and get them to install it, and watch the technician doing it..

Also, out of curiousity... What are the specs of the new PC you're building for your son??

Edited by HyperHorse_

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Oh yeah, I have stopped going any further with this. I realised its not going to work, and I am not going to damage the PC components for the sake of a cool Atomic thread hehe.

 

It was just something I thought of doing last night, as I wanted to check the HDD and see if I couldn't get it up and running while waiting on some parts I have ordered.

 

The PC I am building for my son is constructed from hand me down parts from my old PC when doing my upgrade.

 

AMD 6400 CPU, Asus M2N32Sli-D board, Corsair 800MHz RAM, 8800GT KO,...I've just upgraded to AMD Phenom 9950, M3A79-T board, and PQI 1066Mhz RAM and HD4870 1GB vga,,,

 

I'm doing it myself, got no problems with that. In fact, I got my 13 year old son to put his own PC together. He found it quite fun.

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Consider that a CPU will easily hit 400C within a second without even a stock heatsink and you'll get some idea about the cooling efficiency of that system.

wow...400C...geez..i never thought CPU can get that hot without a HS. thats something new for me. Thanks for the head up!

 

thumb up to the OP as well! thats brave

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first problem is your cup is made of stainless steel..... its the worst conductor of heat.

if it was made of alluminium it would work.

enough time too boot windows and shutdown if full of water.

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Consider that a CPU will easily hit 400C within a second without even a stock heatsink and you'll get some idea about the cooling efficiency of that system.

wow...400C...geez..i never thought CPU can get that hot without a HS. thats something new for me. Thanks for the head up!

 

thumb up to the OP as well! thats brave

 

Old CPUs yeah. I tried some things with newer C2Ds (AMD uses similar technology these days) today. The motherboard would just report an overtemp CPU (ie constant high pitched beeps) and would only POST with the HSF having good thermal contact with the CPU heatspreader. I touched the CPU spreader and it wasn't warm at all. Anyway, newer CPUs will shut themselves down or throttle their speeds in order to keep to safe temps.

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out of topic...what GPU cooling is that in the case?

It's a Thermalright HR-03 cooler. One of the best air coolers you can get for your graphic card (I just bought the TRad2). They have a newer model called the HR-03 GTX which is aimed at the Nvidia GTX 2x0 range of cards.

 

Back to topic, that might work if it's a copper or aluminum cup, stainless steel isn't exactly a great heat conductor (only ideal for cooking and food stuff because it won't melt over the stove like aluminum and it won't dump metals or metal oxides into the food you are cooking like iron and copper). Also, this idea might work if you can find a way to bolt the cup down so that the base is in contact with the heatspreader under a good deal of pressure.

And you'll need a pump system to keep some water flowing and, since you don't have a radiator to go with that, plenty of ice cubes to spare. OR use dry ice.

 

I think it's way too much trouble for its worth though, just get a decent big ass heatsink and slap it on.

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most C2D cpu's have a few secconds of love on the heat spreader before they go awol,

From experience what youre doing should work, the specific heat capacity of water is extremely high so while it will warm up it will take some time, remember ladies and gents that your sandard 2400W kettle holds about a litre of water and still takes a minute or more to boil, intel cpu's get shitty at about the 80 mark so you have some headroom, the trick here would be to get that TIM on the heatsink and make sure the contact surface is as flat as possible.

 

Or find a real heatsink.

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