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The Tick

First attempt at the reverse grad filter

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Ok, so this is probably the second attempt at using it. The first failed miserably as cloud cover proved my enemy.

 

Taken on the weekend at Portarlington. The sunset didn't do much in the way of colour and I agonised over the composition setting up a dozen times in different spots.

 

Took a few goes at setting this up, trying to remember everything bbfreak told me to do :P

 

Random people came up as I was setting up to enquire about the reverse grad filter. Didn't get the hint when I informed them I was a complete noob and had little idea what I was actually doing, they just kept talking.

 

Anyway, here are the better ones. No idea how to stop the flare occurring. Changing the angle of the camera in relation to the sunset seemed to spoil the setup. In retrospect I really didn't adhere to the rule of thirds very well - the sun never really lines up. I probably could have done something else although I would have lost the element that I was trying to introduce in the foreground for each shot. I so need practice.

 

CC most welcome.

 

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While trying to pick through removing the dust spots and applying some dodge to the boat, I did notice purple fringing around there - not sure what I could do to alleviate that.

 

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hey man, without knowing what the scene looks like, all i can suggest is looking for leading lines, use the 1/3's, it does feels like you may have dragged the reverse grad just a little too low so half the water is dark and half is bright, take advantage of the awesome live view canon has given us, it's tough because there is obviously no clouds in the sky, that's not something you can control, keep at it mate, you'll get the feel for it soon enough

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Thanks basketballfreak6

 

I'll admit, I did get a little flustered. I was using the live view though - zoomed in on the point I really wanted in focus etc ...

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yep, not just that but also pay attention to where the dark part of your filter is sitting in your frame

 

but yea just go and shoot more, you'll soon get a feel of what is good light and what's bad, as you said you feel a bit flustered, things happen really fast doesn't it ;) great light don't usually last very long

 

once you get more experienced you can start trying stacking different filters etc :P

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For someone who doesn't know exactly what they're doing, you did pretty darn well. The third shot is my favourite. Keep up the practice and you'll have the process down :)

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For someone who doesn't know exactly what they're doing, you did pretty darn well. The third shot is my favourite. Keep up the practice and you'll have the process down :)

Ditto

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I think the first shot is in fact the strongest, but the change of materials and geometric lines in the left corner is distracting and unnecessary, I would have gotten closer in or zoomed in to crop that out. Also keep in mind that it's usually best to keep the sun out of the frame completely, as you can't really control the resulting flare, which in these shots is very intense, and hence quite distracting from the peaceful views. Keep in mind it can be quite difficult to photoshop out flare, as it can effect a far broader area than it appears. If you have to wait half an hour, or an hour, for the sun to leave the frame then that's what you've got to do.

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