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mark84

Vesuvius inbound?

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In the past I've been excited about dual GPU cards, not so sure about this one. Perhaps its price/performance will somewhat justify its existence.

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http://techreport.com/news/26159/somehow-t...waii-card-right

 

AMD's marketing department is kicking into gear about something...

Damn my 290 puts out enough heat to warm up the house.

 

Could you imagine 2 cores on the one card?

 

That is if that's what it is.

 

My Single 290-OC on any GOOD day of low ambient temps I top out at 71*c.

Having two of these in sandwich form.. hard to believe.

2x 290x cores @ 250w each?

 

Unless their using 2x 290 cores, not 2x 290x to save some heat & maybe restrict the core clocks to 947mhz instead of 1000mhz or more.

Would have to be watercooled like the 7990 below.

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Edited by drawesome

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Unless their using 2x 290 cores, not 2x 290x to save some heat & maybe restrict the core clocks to 947mhz instead of 1000mhz or more.

Would have to be watercooled like the 7990 below.

Will be interesting. Been waiting for something to replace my HD6990 for a while. Have a small case/build, only enough room for 1 card, so the dual GPU cards fit my needs well.

7990 didn't seem worth the price for the performance jump.

 

And yes, water cooling I do anyway, can't stand the noise they make.

So I'll already be doing it. Problem is, card makers need to sell you something that the average Joe without water can use. Will be interesting to see what they do. Probably the closed loop thing as has been mentioned.

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Posted Image

 

Posted Image

 

Just need to know it's length and it'll be insta buy for me. 6990 is beginning to show age ;)

Edit: Doing a quick measurement on screen using PCI-E connector for scale reference, it appears this could be shorter than the 6990 at 277mm long vs 6990 305mm long

Edited by mark84

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Mark is that your case in the the top pic that looks like a brief case? If so that is cool looking, just different :)

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Mark is that your case in the the top pic that looks like a brief case? If so that is cool looking, just different :)

lol I wish!

Nah I think it's what they sent a reviewer the card in.

Would be cool if all of them came like that!

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Sweet. Now all we need is the pricing to see how much they can whack nVidia over the head with it ;)

 

Also, it's sticking in dual slot form factor, another plus for me (no slot space to spare!).

Definitely needs a full board block, if I manage to source this card that'll be the first thing I do lol

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Interesting, I wonder if the 120mm rad can sustain both cores at full clockspeed, or if they're running slower than the 290x. It's a good choice for ITX builds with the room for it I guess, swap out for a full block.

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Huh, never would have guessed that they'd make it work so well. Guessing this is the limit on single-card performance on 28nm though, 500W power draw is just a bit ridiculous.

 

Interesting that it's so quiet, too. I've only read Anandtech's review not the others, no mention of VRM or memory temps, but the GPU cores themselves seem fine for the loudness of the setup.

 

Makes me sad my 7970 doesn't make an appearance on comparison graphs any more :(

 

*edit*

Techpowerup actually has a highly insightful page on temperatures using an IR camera, the VRM system is just barely able to keep things under control. I did wonder, will make it so those looking to run two of these will have to leave a slot space between them.

Toward the end of the test, you see the voltage regulator circuitry glowing a bright white in the thermal image, as the circuity peaks at 103°C, which is quite hot. A look at the PCB's photos reveals that the hot components are not on the back, but the front - their heat moves through the PCB to the other side of the card. Those components are engineered to withstand 120°C without a problem, but it still looks as though AMD didn't think their thermal solution through all the way.

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/AMD/R9_295_X2/29.html

Also massive, massive coil whine. I don't think I could stand a card making this much coil noise.

Edited by TheFrunj

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I'm almost certain to be buying one of these if I can source one, need to replace my aging HD6990.

 

Will be wanting to get a full card block on there asap though, partially because I haven't really any room in my case to stick the radiator (will have to leave case top off with stock cooling) but also to bring those VRM temps down a bit. Plus my 2x360 rads will cool this thing way better ;)

 

500W is kinda scary though. 6990 is bad enough as is for room heating lol

Not too worried about coil noise, at least atm, stick it in an enclosed case and when playing games with explosions and things going on you probably won't notice it much. IIRC my 5970 had a bit of coil noise too, didn't affect me all really. When things were quite you knew it was working hard was all.

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You going to upgrade mobo and cpu at the same time? Just looked up your current motherboard and it's PCIE 2.0 16x, haven't seen any articles comparing PCIE 2.0 to 3.0 to know if there's much of a performance change. I know that the GCN 1.1 architecture passes Crossfire data via PCIE bus rather than the old connectors so it's potentially a thing.

 

Either way I think you'd be CPU limited, even at 4.2GHz. But again, could be wrong.

 

*edit*

Plus I'm not sure how Crossfire-on-a-card goes with the PLX switching chip, does such data even leave the card? Or does it go from core, to switch, to northbridge, back to switch to other core?

Edited by TheFrunj

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You going to upgrade mobo and cpu at the same time? Just looked up your current motherboard and it's PCIE 2.0 16x, haven't seen any articles comparing PCIE 2.0 to 3.0 to know if there's much of a performance change. I know that the GCN 1.1 architecture passes Crossfire data via PCIE bus rather than the old connectors so it's potentially a thing.

 

Either way I think you'd be CPU limited, even at 4.2GHz. But again, could be wrong.

 

*edit*

Plus I'm not sure how Crossfire-on-a-card goes with the PLX switching chip, does such data even leave the card? Or does it go from core, to switch, to northbridge, back to switch to other core?

Umm, yeah old sig, should update it actually. got a 4770k and a maximus gene VI board now. PCI-E 3.0 so should be ok on that front

 

RE: PLX, yeah in older dual gpu cards yeah stuff probably went all the way back to the NB/CPU before bouncing back to the other card. But with the R9 series cards they now directly talk to each other over the PCIE bus, so on the 295, theoretically it should be able to go GPU>PLX>GPU for the inter GPU comms.

Check this page out for some explanation and speed boost benefits

http://www.anandtech.com/show/7930/the-amd...-295x2-review/4

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