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fajw

Best firewall software?

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Thanks for the info.

 

I don't have a specific harm I am thinking of; I just want to be as secure and safe as reasonably possible.

 

What could the star in "*NIX" stand for apart from "U"?

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Thanks for the info.

 

I don't have a specific harm I am thinking of; I just want to be as secure and safe as reasonably possible.

 

What could the star in "*NIX" stand for apart from "U"?

Just means anything that is UNIX like and/or has the similar name Linux / AIX...

Edited by Xen

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The asterisk isn't a direct letter-replacement designation. "*NIX" is simply a convenient term used to denote 'Unix-like' operating systems. A less commonly seen term which denotes the same thing is "UN*X". Asterisk in either is not a wildcard replacement.

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Doesn't fly, Master_Scythe. As well as those, the term has also covered (over time) Solaris, FreeBSB, Idris, Coherent, SunOS, MacOS, Tru64 and craploads of other which have no semblance of "nix" in their name.

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Nope. *NIX represents "UNIX-like" rather than "built on Unix". Just needs to behave similarly, rather than be built upon the code. Even Linux actually has no inheritance from Unix code or association to Unix trademark.

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Doesn't fly, Master_Scythe. As well as those, the term has also covered (over time) Solaris, FreeBSB, Idris, Coherent, SunOS, MacOS, Tru64 and craploads of other which have no semblance of "nix" in their name.

That's why i put the "and/or" a few places explain it as either/or so i didn't want fajw looking at a reference somewhere and getting confused.

 

For those with interest that don't know heres a UNIX map:

 

Posted Image

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I don't have a specific harm I am thinking of; I just want to be as secure and safe as reasonably possible.

Which is what everyones initial advice was based around.

Unless you're hoarding NSA secrets, have a static IP, and use unsecure protocols for your data; you're safe. Windows firewall wont let anything through unless its requested from your end.

 

So, you ask what magic OS I use? Windows!

If I don't request it, it doesn't get in. Also, as i said, since I use common software, if a pug or weakness is found, no doubt an update will be released quick smart.

 

 

You see, most of us here are what would be called 'power users'. We have jobs, games, or projects that require us to have good and responsive, reliable computers.

When you start adding new DLL's to the mix, tunnels for your data, and the hit to system performance; a 3rd party (software) firewall suddenly is unacceptable.

 

using your overly paranoid logic, When windows firewall is secure, and frequently patched and tested, I dont know if I want a 3rd party filtering protocol listening on such a low layer of the TCP\IP stack, possibly with a flaw of its own.

 

 

In short:

 

Pros of windows fiewall:

-Secure.

-Patched

-Tested

-Wide software Compatible

-Free

-No resource hit.

 

Cons of windows firewall:

-little 'user level monitoring' (cant watch what its doing)

-Doesn't filter outgoing, last I checked (so don't install trojans and you're fine)

 

 

Pros of aftermarket:

-Can watch what its doing

-Will handle outbound connections (useful if you install untrusted, or closed source apps)

 

Cons:

-System slowdown

-Network tools might not be 'aware' of it.

-Another applications that could have a security flaw

-Often costs money

-Risk of system instability due to 'hook' DLL's (anyone whos used software firewalls a long time will understand this; regedit for hours >< lol).

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-Doesn't filter outgoing, last I checked (so don't install trojans and you're fine)

Yes it does. Windows firewall is an inbound/outbound firewall. Defaults to allow all outbound on a clean Windows install. Configuring outbound can be a pain in the arse using the windows interface, but an add-on shell such as I mentioned earlier makes it a simple 'click on prompt' to allow/disallow outbound traffic on a per program basis.

Edited by Catweazle

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