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Spriggan

Isp's

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Im moving house an looking at setting up a connection was just after some recomendations for ISPS to check out and those to avoid. I live in a small city in QLD so probably only your major providers would touch me.

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iinet have a closeish relationship with Optus, see what they can offer, been happy with them for years.

 

Cheers

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TPG cover minor areas too and have possibly the best pricing of the majors but hiccups in service can be a problem.

 

The other thing is that many rural areas are still ADSL1 only and for whatever reason the pricing is often "more for less".

 

Talk to the locals - these days it's like 2/3rds of people have an ADSL connection at least so there's plenty of scope to guage opinions.

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Im on the gold coast and have used eftel/clubtelco/whaterelse they use (wouldnt touch them again) we were geting disconnected every 2 weeks (i was on a payment plan cos they stuffed up their autopay) and 4 letters a week.

we are currently with ant (ausnomadtech) and cant get over how good they have been, they are based in NSW and no overseas call center. they were the only ones i could find with a $60 unlimited (we do 1tb a month regularly, to which they said "go for it its why its there")

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Even the standard 'not 100mbps' cable is great.

 

isnt it 50 (theoretical)? Still double the max ADSL2+

It's 30Mbps. So yeah, still superior to ADSL2+.

 

There are other benefits too, like fucking off PPPo[E/A]. Pointless source of latency that it is.

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I'll echo the others here and back the "cable if you can get it".

 

Besides the occasional issues of "water in the pit" and so long as you dog Telstra to actually do something about it if your connection fails when it rains, it's much better than ADSL2.

 

This might be a good place to start your search for what's in your exchange.

 

http://www.adsl2exchanges.com.au/

 

I had no problem with Internode when with them although my exchange is about the same size as an outdoor dunny so only Tesltra Dslams there. Bigpond ended up being a far more cost efficient package for me so I shifted. It works ok but having experienced the cable thing and both my parents and my brother's place, I wish I could access it.

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'A' doesnt add much, E does.

And neither are necessary. My first ADSL connection simply had me enter a static IP+subnet+gateway into the modem's WAN address settings and bam. Connected.

 

PPP* is a holdover from dialup days and can die in a fire.

Edited by SquallStrife

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Really? Well... yes, that makes sense.... but how else do you ensure identification?

 

two very possible scenarios;

1. Owner moves out and takes a few days to dosconnect the service. ASIO chase them down for naughty stuff of new owner.

2. Telstra 'repair' several lines (like they did with mine recently); without PPPo* authentication, how do I know I have 'MY' internet?

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It's a non-issue, since the ISP knows who is (or is meant to be) connected to which DSLAM port. In the first instance, the new occupant would still need to know your IP details, and the ISP won't give those out over the phone without verifying your identity.

 

In the second instance, your settings won't work if you've been patched in to some other ISP's DSLAM by mistake.

 

An even better solution would be DHCP with a captive portal, which is how Bigpond Cable does it. Once you've logged in with your Bigpond credentials, the modem's MAC is recorded, and you're set.

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Without the MAC registering;

 

if you had 50 people on a DSLAM all with Telstra, and the tech mixed the lines further up the street, no one could end up on someone elses plan?

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Nope. Each loop is an independent /30 subnet. If you don't have the correct IP settings for the loop you're plugged in to, it won't work at all.

 

What you've described would happen if the DSLAM was a switch, and the connected customers were all on the same segment. For a variety of reasons, this is absolutely not the case.

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Makes perfect sense, thanks :)

I cant say ive ever looked into addressing on the large of a scale.

 

Internal network admin? Check.

Certified Telstra Technician? Check (but expired)

 

but widescale broadband technician? No....

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There isn't really anything special about it. Subnetting works just the same on the Internet as it does on your corporate WAN.

 

An IP address is 32 bits long, so a /30 network has 30 bits for the network, and 2 bits for the host, giving you 22-2 usable addresses, one for the modem, and one for the DSLAM port.

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no no, i get that, I just want aware of how it was done on the DSLAM end. Wether there was some form of auto negotiation, or if it was all static, etc.

 

I had assumed (with no basis...) that each ISP would use their own subnet, and the IP's would be handed out randomly 'as available'.

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In our old setup it was static.

 

Obviously if you're using some form of PPP, then the DSLAM port doesn't need any IP configuration at all.

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So, is that to say that without PPP the DSLAM owners would need to give hardware level access to their resellers, in order to assign IP's?

Where as, using PPP they're able to 'forget it' and use a software level authentication method?

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But with that software not currently existing, do you think that could be a reason that wholesalers require PPP?

 

I'm not arguing there's not a better theoretical way, I'm just trying to find out the 'why' of right now.

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