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retiredfromlife

Best Way To Limit Volume

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What methods do you use to limit the total volume of your speakers and head sets?

 

When playing movies and games I would like to limit the overall volume. The special effects cause all sorts of problems. Especially when using head phones. Because of this I have stopped using my head set.

 

So far I just use on board audio. What is the best way to limit the overall volume?

If a third party sound card offered good options I would go that way but I have no experience tryingt to limit volume.

 

I dual boot betweenXP and 7 so I would like hardware that still worked with both.

 

Any help would be appreciated.

 

Regards

Edited by retiredfromlife
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when my audio is too loud, i turn it down :P either in software or using the volume knob on my hardware.

 

but if, for example, setting a comfortable level for dialogue means that explosions and such are tearing your house/ears apart, then you probably want some sort of dynamic range compression. before you explore hardware options, you should look for media players that include this as an option and/or check whether your system software can already do it.

 

http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2013/02/normalise-the-sound-volume-on-your-pc-with-windows-loudness-equalisation-setting/

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I don't have a volume dial on my hardware, so my solution was to find an AutoHotKey script to allow changes within Windows. Works on 7 and 8.1, haven't tried others.

 

http://dan.hersam.com/2010/05/06/mute-and-adjust-volume-with-keyboard-hotkeys/

 

http://www.autohotkey.com/

 

Can control volume up with Ctrl+Alt+Up arrow, down is similar, and mute with Ctrl+Alt+Period.

 

The only thing it doesn't work with is when I'm in Foobar2000 sending audio via WASAPI Push to my DAC, but that's normal and won't affect most people.

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I don't have a volume dial on my hardware, so my solution was to find an AutoHotKey script to allow changes within Windows. Works on 7 and 8.1, haven't tried others.

 

http://dan.hersam.com/2010/05/06/mute-and-adjust-volume-with-keyboard-hotkeys/

 

http://www.autohotkey.com/

 

Can control volume up with Ctrl+Alt+Up arrow, down is similar, and mute with Ctrl+Alt+Period.

 

The only thing it doesn't work with is when I'm in Foobar2000 sending audio via WASAPI Push to my DAC, but that's normal and won't affect most people.

 

What hardware are you using? It may be that you don't care, but depending on your system, software volume control might be reducing the bit rate when lowering the volume. Best signal path is 0dBFS from source to output, and use an analogue control for volume. Passive controllers are pretty cheap.

Edited by komuso

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What hardware are you using? It may be that you don't care, but depending on your system, software volume control might be reducing the bit rate when lowering the volume. Best signal path is 0dBFS from source to output, and use an analogue control for volume. Passive controllers are pretty cheap.

 

Source is SPDIF over Coaxial from PC to my DAC, a Matrix Mini-I 2010 (the inbuilt headphone amp died), then RCA to my Bravo Audio Ocean tube amp which is out of reach for messy desk reasons, and PSB M4U-1 headphones.

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What hardware are you using? It may be that you don't care, but depending on your system, software volume control might be reducing the bit rate when lowering the volume. Best signal path is 0dBFS from source to output, and use an analogue control for volume. Passive controllers are pretty cheap.

 

Source is SPDIF over Coaxial from PC to my DAC, a Matrix Mini-I 2010 (the inbuilt headphone amp died), then RCA to my Bravo Audio Ocean tube amp which is out of reach for messy desk reasons, and PSB M4U-1 headphones.

 

In some cases 24 bit signals can be transported over spdif, but not all equipment supports it. I don't know about your setup. Also, there isn't any reason to feed an attenuated line signal into a tube amp, as is the case in your set up if you're using software volume. You'll be getting more noise from the tubes, and missing out on the possible benefits of tubes by not feeding a hot enough signal. Try leaving the software faders up, and control volume from the tube amp, if you can be bothered reaching across the desk. That'd be more in line with common convention.

Edited by komuso

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