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spyder

UPS Recommendation

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Considering there is a large storm heading over Melbourne tonight, raised something in my mind that I have been thinking about for a little while.

 

I'm looking for a UPS recommendation.

 

I don't have much in the way of power requirements. I am really after something that :

  • has enough power to run a ADSL2 Modem (with 802.11n wireless) and a fixed line hands free phone handset
  • that I could, if needed, charge a phone or a tablet off
  • Nice to have - be able to shut my main machine down politely
  • $150 to $200 max (the less the better, understand the price vs quality/reliability trade offs)
  • Reasonable price battery replacement cost if required.

Any experiences or recommendations?

Edited by spyder

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If you're looking for a passive UPS, you're good to go.

Passive means it just sits there waiting till a blackout, brown out, or a spike, then steps in.

 

However, Active is feeding the device CONTINUOUSLY from the UPS, and using AC to keep its batteries up.

 

Ive run a few $60 MSY UPS's they did well.

 

One is on my modem, so my laptop keeps wifi when there's a blackout.

And one is on my File Server to ensure safe shutdown.

 

I'm yet to find a single device that wont have a USB port to shutdown the PC for a blackout.

 

Battery replacements are cheap as chips, SLA batteries from jaycar do the trick fine.

People say to use Deep Cycle, but really, if your UPS see's 5+ cycles in its life, its lucky (short brownouts or blackouts wont deep cycle the battery)

So just stick with the cheap SLA's

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I've been using a Cyberpower unit for the last couple of years with no problem (though the initial unit was DOA!)

 

The software is really basic but does the job. Mine has 3 conditioned outlets and 3 battery backup outlets. I use the conditioned outlets for my monitors and the battery outlets for the server, modem and my PC. It gives me about an hour of running time which is way overkill for what you are looking for but they have a range of models depending on how much power you want to draw.

 

An interesting solution for tablet/phone power is a solar battery. I picked up one from jaycar with 2 usb outlets and one usb input for fast re-charge. Never had to use the input as the solar cells on one side do the job...

Edited by Mac Dude

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Currently running an Upsonic Line Interactive 2000VA UPS for my main (gaming) desktop and monitor and a switch. Also did my ADSL2+ router until I went NBN Fixed Wireless.

Fan only works when it is on battery so no noise, but the LCD display is annoyingly bright so I have a piece of cardboard taped over it (no option to turn it off).

Has three battery backed outlets.

 

http://www.upsonic.com.au/domestic-sme.php

1000 / 1400 / 2000VA have user replaceable batteries. The 600/800 VA ones supposedly doe not. I assume they are a sealed box.

 

 

Also got an old 750VA Eaton here that I just slapped new batteries in. Lasted some years before the USB port fritzed up on it (so no automatic shutdown). Still use it for working on customers PCS, especially when doing things like BIOS updates where a power failure would be a real problem. Turn it on and charge only as needed.

 

Also got a small Kstar BM3060 here for my small server. Only 600VA, battery is user replaceable and is cheap. No fan so silent.

 

http://www.auspcmarket.com.au/kstar-bm3060-line-interactive-ups-600va-high-frequency-cpu-control-via-usb-port/

To small for a decent PC. The 1500VA one is in your price range though

http://www.auspcmarket.com.au/kstar-bm3150-line-interactive-ups-1500va-high-frequency-cpu-control-via-usb-port/

Not sure about the bigger one but the 600VA only has 2 power sockets on it and pretty sure only one is battery backed, the other is only surge protected. May be wrong on that.

 

/edit. Just tested this and both outlets are battery backed.

 

 

Newest UPS only powers my router (with inbuilt phone base station) and the NBN NTD. It's a 650VA PowerShield UPS PSCG650 CompuGuard. Has two battery outlets and one surge outlet.

http://powershield.com.au/powersheild_product/compuguard-2/

Pretty sure the battery is user replaceable in this unit too.

Again silent in use.

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I used to use Upsonic a lot until I had some major issues when warranty was required. Discussions with a friend of mine who runs a small IT business suggested I wasn't alone on this.

 

I have been using Eaton products for a while but my regular supplier stopped selling them. Now I am using APC.

 

When you are spending around $100 - $200 you are going to be getting a low end unit regardless of brand. I remember reading a disturbing article about the crappy units they sell through MSY some time ago although that may be different now. I know they sell Eaton too.

 

APC is a good brand and you pay a little extra when comparing power output between say Upsonic or Eaton. Shutdown software tends to support Microsoft and I would check their website if you intend to run it against something else. I know the cheaper Eaton units work with NUT for linux.

 

Considering you are spending money on something designed to take a hit, I wouldn't go too cheap.

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My Eaton has been reasonably good over the last 10 years, with only one battery replacement. Shutdown software was never really updated to work beyond WinXP or so. Speaker can't be turned off or volume changed, which is annoying as fuck.

 

I'd probably look at APC for my next couple, tho', just from a support basis. Assuming I didn't make my own battery array hooked up to a solar panel <.>

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Cheap ones dont scare me much. Really they're just an inverter and a battery.

 

It only just hit me, with a truck battery, a 3A or so charger, and a Sine Wave 12v inverter, you could build a ghetto but probably longer lasting\cheap one, lol.

 

Or hell, skip the inverter and get a DC power supply for the computer in question.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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