Jump to content
Forum upgrade is live! Read more... ×
Sign in to follow this  
Dasa

AMD Zen

Recommended Posts

The core counts, cache, and TDP are all the same as the Ryzen 7 1700X. However, the base clock on the Ryzen 7 2700X is 300MHz faster, so there is an automatic speed bump without even factoring in architecture optimizations.

I'm not sure there will be any architectural changes. The only thing mentioned so far is an improved Precision Boost. Will help with maintaining the higher clock speeds but not IPC.

It's been hinted at. Apparently Threadripper has a different cache setup in one of the levels... but I'm not sure about that as I assumed they were all the same die. But also according to what the tech press understand is that for Ryzen U and Ryzen G, a few arch tweaks were introduced that may have eek out an increase in IPC. I haven't looked into their claims but they're all saying it.

Sounds like they banking on the nm reduction to get the speed increase.

Well it should keep Ryzen relevant until Zen 2. If the 10% increase is true then 400MHz bump up should bring them back into shooting range of CFL as benchmarks have always shown that Ryzen scales better with higher clocks.

 

Here's to hoping to a duopoly again.

Edited by SceptreCore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AMD Ryzen 2000-series lineup leaks ahead of April debut

"AMD at CES in January shared a handful of details regarding its second generation Ryzen CPUs. The chips, built on the 12nm Zen+ architecture, were said to feature higher clock speeds and a pair of new boost technologies – Precision Boost 2 and XFR 2.

Now, we’ve got some additional details to build on courtesy of Spanish website El Chapuzas Informatico (via VideoCardz).

 

In a series of leaked slideshows, we see that AMD’s lineup consists of six Ryzen 2000-series SKUs. At the low end is the $99 Ryzen 3 2200G, a four-core / four-thread component with a base clock of 3.5GHz, a turbo clock of 3.7GHz and a 65W TDP.

 

The next step up is the Ryzen 5 2400G. At four cores and eight threads, the chip features a base clock of 3.6GHz that can boost up to 3.9GHz when needed. Expect to pay around $169 for this 65W TDP part.

2018-03-07-image-13.jpg

 

The Ryzen 5 2600, meanwhile, is a six-core / 12-thread chip with a TDP of 65W, a base clock speed of 3.3GHz and a turbo clock speed of 3.9GHz. It’ll retail for approximately $199.

 

AMD’s Ryzen 5 2600X is also a six-core / 12-thread processor albeit with a faster base clock of 3.6GHz and a zippy turbo clock of 4.25GHz. It’ll consume a bit more juice as well as evident by its 95W TDP and of course, you’ll a little more for that extra power - $249, according to the slide.

 

At the upper-end of the lineup is the Ryzen 7 2700 and 2700X. Both chips sport eight cores / 16 threads with the non-X version boasting a base clock of 3.2GHz, a boost clock of 4.1GHz, a TDP of 65W and a price tag of $299. The speedier 2700X will feature a base clock of 3.7GHz, a turbo clock of 4.35GHz and a 105W TDP. Expect to pay $369 for the opportunity.

 

The chips will run in new 400-series motherboards although as noted on one of the slides, optimized BIOS updates are coming from motherboard manufacturers sometime this month.

 

As always, it’s important to remember that expectations should be kept in check when dealing with leaks of this nature. Such is especially the case here as some of the slides mention an embargo date of March 15, 2017, but also contain pricing information from “January 2018.” This could easily be human error but it is worth pointing out. Either way, we should find out soon enough as the April 2018 launch window looms."

 

If this slide is to be believed... then AMD has listened to the criticism about the 1800X, about it being totally superfluous and only as good as the 1700X or even 1700 once overclocked at a far more exorbitant price. So I was hoping that was a mve they would make... and hopefully this is so.

 

EDIT: Could be fake. Check out the embargo lift date in the bottom left corner. ^

Edited by SceptreCore
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AMD Ryzen 3000: Globalfoundries expects 5.0 GHz for the 7nm process

 

Well, let's do one more AMD related item that will make your eyebrows frown. Globalfoundries Chief Technical Officer, Gary Patton, recently talked about the upcoming 7nm manufacturing generation. The advantages compared to 14nm have grown significantly. The die sizes could be more than halved, clock rates in a range of 5.0 GHz are realistic.

 

This could be interesting for AMD's Zen 2, presumably in the form of Ryzen 3000, as reported on PC Games hardware Germany. Next month, you guys will see Pinnacle Ridge released, a Zen Refresh ("Zen +") within the Ryzen 2000 series, which will leverage the enhanced 12LP over the older (last years) 14LPP process. It gets more exciting with Zen 2, which will be manufactured at 7nm. Although AMD has not yet confirmed that they will use Globalfoundries (or TSMC) as partner, GlowFlo (ex AMD) probably will be the partner. Late February, AnandTech spoke to Globalfoundries' CTO, Gary Patton about the 7nm generation. The article has been largely unnoticed but contains some interesting details.

 

Patton switched from IBM to Globalfoundries in 2015 when the manufacturing division was sold to the partner. Since then, the development department has made significant progress in the first 7nm process. Originally, one would at best assume a halving of the required chip area compared to 14nm. Improvements in the wiring, in particular, mean that the area savings should now be around a factor of 2.7. A hypothetical zeppelin-die (Ryzen 1000) at 7nm would therefore only about 80 instead of 213 mm² large. This all allows much potential for additional or larger CPU Cores. In addition, Globalfoundries expects a performance increase of 40 percent. Clock speeds in the range of 5.0 GHz seem quite realistic according to Patton, whereby it will finally arrive on the chip design - CPUs must be designed on such frequencies in order to be able to use the theoretical process possibilities.

 

Time will tell, Ryzen 3000 going for 5 GHz? Bring it on.

Edited by SceptreCore

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the 2700x does come with boost of 4.35ghz, that would really interesting as that would be a nice performance increase. If you can OC even a bit higher over that or get all cores to 4.35 without crazy temps, Id be tempted to pick one up. Really hope they get the memory clocks up too. Im running 2933 since 3200 just is not stable even after bios updates.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the 2700x does come with boost of 4.35ghz, that would really interesting as that would be a nice performance increase. If you can OC even a bit higher over that or get all cores to 4.35 without crazy temps, Id be tempted to pick one up. Really hope they get the memory clocks up too. Im running 2933 since 3200 just is not stable even after bios updates.

Just let old Sceptre know what you'd take to part with the old 1700x

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AMD and Intel are as bad as each other at hiding these things. Ryzen is a pretty new architecture so don't expect it to have zero vulnerabilities.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AMD Ryzen 5 2600X Accidentally Listed on Amazon

Amazon Germany accidentally listed the upcoming AMD Ryzen 5 2600X six-core processor. According to the listing availability of the chip is scheduled for 19th April. The chip is priced at 248.93€ including taxes, which is in line with the launch SEP prices we saw in the leaked AMD press-deck posted earlier this month. The listing also mentions a handful specifications, such as the chip being based on 12 nm silicon fabrication process, and featuring clock speeds of 3.60 GHz, with 4.25 GHz turbo. Unlike with some of the higher end first-generation Ryzen retail packages, AMD will be including cooling solutions with all models of the 2nd generation Ryzen series. The Ryzen 5 2600X will include a Wraith Spire cooler, characterized by its RGB LED ring, and having a design focus on low-noise operation.

8XpsYLP5kx0lL2nN.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to some early benches I've seen it's close to 20% faster than its predecessors at stock clocks. Although it helps that the clocks are bumped up. But I'm hoping that it should be able to be pushed harder to 4.5GHz

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

in game i5 8400 is ~15% faster than a 1600x@4ghz when both have 3200 ram but ~10% slower rendering video

with 2666c16 ram both cpu at stock the i5 8400 is ~20% faster in game and ~5% slower than the 1600x rendering video

so unfortunately it wont be enough to put it back in front for games but it will close the gap there and increase the lead in its multithreaded performance

price will be important

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

in game i5 8400 is ~15% faster than a 1600x@4ghz when both have 3200 ram but ~10% slower rendering video

with 2666c16 ram both cpu at stock the i5 8400 is ~20% faster in game and ~5% slower than the 1600x rendering video

so unfortunately it wont be enough to put it back in front for games but it will close the gap there and increase the lead in its multithreaded performance

price will be important

If they can continue to undercut Intel on price... which they can as Intel are still running on Z370 boards - and we were supposed to see the cheaper chipsets at the beginning of the year - then the case for a Ryzen system still makes sense as it will only be a little bit behind.

 

Can't make any determinations until the 2000 series are released though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thats a nice drop in memory latency and a nice little boost to frequency im surprised its only 5% quicker than 1800x in there game tests but since its averaged over a few games with a gtx1080 they may be a little gpu bound

looks like its nipping at the heals of the i5 8400

qaQxJuymorK5I1D7.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeha it seems they have made some minor architecture tweaks. The main thing is it's going to be a significant improvement over the 1000 series.

 

They're close to being released... so it shouldn't be long now till we see what they're like on 400 series mobos and final overclocking results.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you know i had a dream the other night that amd had stuck a 128m l4 cache on the 2700x and i was all excited drooling over the die pics and to be getting a amd cpu to replace my 6700k

but then i woke up all depressed to realize it was just a dream and went back to playing nwn (2002 version) on my overclocked beasti at least until the vic nordoc server went down...

Edited by Dasa
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you know i had a dream the other night that amd had stuck a 128m l4 cache on the 2700x and i was all excited drooling over the die pics and to be getting a amd cpu to replace my 6700k

but then i woke up all depressed to realize it was just a dream and went back to playing nwn (2002 version) on my overclocked beasti at least until the vic nordoc server went down...

Hahahaha... what a dream

 

And hats off to you for still playing the old NWN.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
AMD Ryzen 7 2700X User Publishes Benchmarks & Overclocking Results Ahead of Launch

 

AMD-Ryzen-7-2700X-4.3GHz-overclock-1030x

 

At 4.3 GHz the Ryzen 7 2700X scored 1946 points in Cinebench R15, which puts it in the same league with Intel’s 8-core Skylake-X i7 7820X and more than three times the score of an FX 8370, AMD’s previous generation mainstream flagship CPU.

 

Firestrike-Physics-740x416.jpg

 

In 3DMark Fire Strike the CPU managed to score 22,226 points running at a slightly lower clock speed of 4.25 GHz, placing it surprisingly close to a stock Threadripper 1920X, which scores just under 23,000 points.

 

The user’s test setup also included 3600 MHz DDR4 memory, which the 2700X did not seem to have any problem running. With that being said, our sources have told us that users can expect to be able to hit higher memory speeds than that on high-end X470 motherboards.

 

Worthy of note as well is that XFR 2.0 requires a 400 series board to work. So right out of the box a 2700X will operate at higher frequencies on an X470 board as compared to an X370 one for example. As we get even closer to the April 19th launch date more details will surface about how well exactly AMD’s 2nd generation Ryzen parts overclock, so stay tuned.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×