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AMD Zen

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https://www.tomshardware.com/news/amd-fenghuang-ryzen-vega-soc,37551.html

The semi-custom SoC, codenamed Fenghuang, will power Zhongshan Subor's upcoming gaming console and PC. The Fenghuang chip harnesses the power of AMD's Zen processor and Vega graphics processing unit architectures. The SoC features a Ryzen processor with four cores and eight threads running at 3GHz and 24 Vega Compute Units operating at 1.3GHz. An Accelerated Processing Unit (APU) might be the first thing that comes to mind; however, the Fenghuang SoC is quite the opposite. APUs don't come with their own graphics memory, and the Fenghuang chip has 8GB of high-performance GDDR5 memory at its disposal. Jack Huynh also confirmed that the SoC will support the chipmaker's existing and next-generation technologies, such as AMD FreeSync, Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition software and Rapid Packed Math.

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On 8/13/2018 at 10:11 AM, Jeruselem said:

Intel have still have the OEM sales, AMD need to start putting Zen into OEM machines as you can't just rely on gamers and uber-system builders. The big money is in the servers though.

AMD are trying. They do have some product wins. Intel seems to be losing focus on OEM sales though in favour of emerging markets I think. Well... that or they are being unusually benevolent. 

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10 hours ago, SceptreCore said:

AMD are trying. They do have some product wins. Intel seems to be losing focus on OEM sales though in favour of emerging markets I think. Well... that or they are being unusually benevolent. 

I think for low end office machines and home users who don't know any better, you don't have to do much as long as it's profitable to keep sending out those machines. Changing an entire OEM line from Intel to AMD would require a bit of planning.

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AMD hands TSMC its entire 7nm portfolio: Vega 20, Zen 2 and Navi right around the corner

Why it matters: This is the last piece of the puzzle in AMD's long journey to put its manufacturing strategy in order. Unfortunately this meant dropping Globalfoundries, and taking on TSMC as the go-to partner for its current portfolio. TSMC's manufacturing lead over Intel is substantial and AMD aims to capitalize on that.

Mark Papermaster, CTO of AMD, has announced that the company has finally leveled out its GPU and CPU development and unified everything under a single manufacturing node, at 7nm, handing TSMC the keys to the kingdom.

In a blog post, the exec explains how the company's long term vision has finally paid off and AMD is now in a position to put its competition between a rock and a hard place with advanced 7nm designs in both GPU and CPU segments, thanks exclusively to the help of TSMC. This announcement sets the stage for the departure of GlobalFoundries, AMD's other, oldest, foundry partner.

The announcement had already been hinted at during several corporate communications, events and calls, however, it is the first time AMD comes forward and effectively drives this narrative. Papermaster said "Our work with TSMC on their 7nm node has gone very well and we have seen excellent results from early silicon."

Papermaster goes on to report that multiple 7nm products have taped out at TSMC. This includes the workstation-class GPU, Vega 20, and the next generation CPU architecture, Zen 2, all manufactured by TSMC. Going forward, AMD will focus its entire product portfolio on TSMC's 7nm process, and that includes this year's Vega 20, followed by an early 2019 launch of the Zen 2-based server CPU, Epyc, and later that year, the Navi GPU architecture, the long-awaited 7nm follow-up to Polaris which AMD is now beginning to talk up.

For more time than most AMD fans would care to remember, the company had relied on GlobalFoundries to cater to its semiconductor manufacturing needs. The results, however, have been a mixed bag. GlobalFoundries has tripped itself up more than once while playing catch-up with Intel, having twice nixxed its developing processes. It trashed its 14nm development in favor of licensing it off Samsung, and now it has announced it has ended its 7nm node. In the meantime, TSMC, the backup fab for AMD, not only delivered where GlobalFoundries failed, but managed to overtake Intel in manufacturing technology, and this has paid off.

While recognizing GlobalFoundries' role in producing 14nm and 12nm GPUs and CPUs, in particular for Zen and Zen+, which proved great successes in restoring AMD's reputation, it seems that the relationship between AMD and its oldest foundry partner will not go beyondthose nodes. With TSMC, AMD now has the weapons to fend off its biggest competitor, Intel.

 

Good news for AMD and consumers

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My only problem with the Zen architecture is the memory problem.  It is one of the reasons why I have always chosen Intel for all my CPU choices, up till now.  The fact that AMD has released the 2990WX is of great interest to me, due to its core count and price.  However, as always with AMD, there is a caveat.  In this case, memory latency, which is the biggest one, and I am not mentioning the other memory elephant in the room either.

I look at the design of the 2990WX and I marvel that it can even exist at all.  Then you look at how its designed and one wonders how designers thought it was a good idea to design it the way it is.  As I look over the horizon, there is no word whether there is an incoming fix for this in the future, which is a part that most workstation designers would kill to work with.  I guess, its just business as usual with AMD.

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On 9/9/2018 at 5:24 PM, strifus said:

My only problem with the Zen architecture is the memory problem.  It is one of the reasons why I have always chosen Intel for all my CPU choices, up till now.  The fact that AMD has released the 2990WX is of great interest to me, due to its core count and price.  However, as always with AMD, there is a caveat.  In this case, memory latency, which is the biggest one, and I am not mentioning the other memory elephant in the room either.

I look at the design of the 2990WX and I marvel that it can even exist at all.  Then you look at how its designed and one wonders how designers thought it was a good idea to design it the way it is.  As I look over the horizon, there is no word whether there is an incoming fix for this in the future, which is a part that most workstation designers would kill to work with.  I guess, its just business as usual with AMD.

Zen 2 is going to have a drastic change in the memory department.

Stock.PNG.6db6ce3265f0ce5c30edf46fdae0886b.PNG

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Oops phone edit results in repost 

Edited by Dasa

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What software are you looking at using with 2990wx that is latency sensitive?

 

Latency on Intel quad channel systems ìsnt great ether 

8706_23_amd-ryzen-threadripper-2990wx-29

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6 hours ago, Dasa said:

picture

You also have to take into account the architecture differences they've chosen. Micro arch's are a collection of tradeoffs. A sacrifice here for a plus there.

Edited by SceptreCore

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Right!  Crazy how small the chip was... Some found this in between the layers of the pcb.... We were all discussing it at work. 

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On 10/6/2018 at 12:33 AM, gamble said:

Right!  Crazy how small the chip was... Some found this in between the layers of the pcb.... We were all discussing it at work. 

Definitely not an "accident" ...

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