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On 1/28/2019 at 9:09 AM, Jeruselem said:

So threadripper is effectively dead?

No. They pushed Threadripper 2 up to 32 cores which is double what Ryzen 3000 is likely to do.

What it likely to happen is that Threadripper will scale down its amount of chips back to what we saw with the first gen of Threadripper. Probably just 24 and 32 core versions.

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2 minutes ago, SceptreCore said:

No. They pushed Threadripper 2 up to 32 cores which is double what Ryzen 3000 is likely to do.

What it likely to happen is that Threadripper will scale down its amount of chips back to what we saw with the first gen of Threadripper. Probably just 24 and 32 core versions.

So threadripper is still for those people with far too much money ...

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5 minutes ago, Jeruselem said:

So threadripper is still for those people with far too much money ...

Just like Core-X

Content creators love Threadripper though.

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AMD Zen/Navi APU leaks ahead of PS5, next-gen Xbox debut

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A CUSTOM AMD chip that looks bound for the PlayStation 5 (PS4) and next-generation Xbox console has surfaced online. 

Serial leaker TUM_APISAK has the scoop and claims that the APU will be called 'Gonzalo' and can be identified with the following part number: 2G16002CE8JA2_32/10/10_13E9.

The so-called AMD Gonzalo will likely be based on the Zen 2 architecture, and the illustration above shows it'll feature eight processor cores that clock in at between 1GHz to 3.2GHz; the current AMD Jaguar APUs that power the PS4 Pro and Xbox One X currently run at up to 2.13GHz and 2.3GHz, respectively.

On the graphics side, the Gonzalo looks set to incorporate AMD's next-generation Navi GPU architecture in the form of the Navi 10 Lite. Details about the part remain thin on the ground, but the leak says it should come clocked in at at least 1GHz. 

TUM_APISAK also suggests that the APU will be based on the AM4 socket and offer 4MB of L2 cache and 16 MB of L3 cache. 

The latest rumour suggests that AMD will finally launch Navi at the E3 video game conference in June, where both Microsoft's so-called 'Scarlett' Xbox lineup and the PS5 are expected to make their debut. 

Microsoft confirmed at CES that it would use AMD's silicon in its next-gen console, while Twitter user @KOMACHI_ENSAKA, backing up earlier rumours, claims this leaked AMD APU will show up in Sony's PS5.

 

Now this is exciting news!

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I wonder if the PS5 could be "upgraded" with a future AMD chip by a user? Probably not!

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2 hours ago, Jeruselem said:

I wonder if the PS5 could be "upgraded" with a future AMD chip by a user? Probably not!

😄 😄 😄 

If you thought Apple were bad... Sony and Microsoft would get really upset.

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1 hour ago, SceptreCore said:

😄 😄 😄 

If you thought Apple were bad... Sony and Microsoft would get really upset.

In theory, you could run Windows and Linux on the PS5 and new XBOX ... if you hacked the firmware

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An update on TSMC's transition to 7nm EUV mass production and future plans

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Beginning at the end of March, TSMC will be ready to begin mass production of 7nm wafers using extreme ultraviolet lithography. ASML, a producer of lithography machinery has already allocated 18 of the 30 systems it is building in 2019 for TSMC.

Once the next six weeks pass and TSMC has its 7nm EUV production running at full scale, the company's 5nm process will be moved to risk production status. EUV will remain in use for 5nm and is expected to be viable down to 3nm. By the end of 2019, TSMC will be taping out chip designs on 5nm nodes, with volume production slated for early 2020.

Even though 7nm processes have been in large scale production since April 2018, the switch to EUV allows for fewer defects and fewer steps required during the production process. The addition of new manufacturing capabilities will allow TSMC to gain additional business from high performance computing and automotive businesses.

Last year, 7nm EUV accounted for just nine percent of TSMC's wafer sales. This year, the company is on track to make the newer process bring in a quarter of its total sales.

The latest updates on TSMC match up with previous predictions and plans to build new facilities. New factories will open in 2020 for 5nm, with additional plants being built with a target of 2022 for 3nm wafers. Despite a number of issues with malware, bad chemicals, and the sheer difficulty of producing tiny transistors, TSMC remains the leader of wafer manufacturing.

 

I wonder if this means we might see Zen 2 just go straight to 7nm+? It's an interesting thought... but I bet they've probably already ramped 7nm by now.

and if 5nm is ready by 2020.. then Zen 3 might just go straight to that as well. It certainly is forward thinking to not have your own fabs.

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New Intel CPU Vulnerability Bodes Well For AMD

Intel processors are vulnerable to an attack, nicknamed Spoiler, to which AMD processors are immune according to researchers at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute and the University of Lübeck. Intel will not be able to spin this as an industry-wide problem as they did last January when two other vulnerabilities, Spectre and Meltdown, were revealed. This bodes well for AMD shareholders.

What is scary about Spoiler is that it can victimize you through a JavaScript on a malicious website which then enables access to your passwords, your encryption keys, and other data stored in memory.

In January 2018, when Spectre and Meltdown were revealed, Intel said it was an industry-wide problem implying that Intel processors were not at a disadvantage to AMD. This time around the researchers tested AMD processors and found them to be immune. Consequently, Spoiler will give AMD an advantage over Intel.

The question now is whether AMD's advantage will be big enough and last long enough for them to gain significant market share.

Intel initially addressed Spectre and Meltdown by releasing performance sapping software patches to the microcode in their processors.

Last January, early estimates of the performance penalty for the Spectre and Meltdown patches ranged from 5% to 25%. Since then datacenter system admins have told me that the patches have gotten more efficient and the performance penalty has decreased.

However, recently Intel changed the licensing agreement for these software patches to prevent developers from publishing benchmark results.

In the near-term, I expect Intel will come out with a software patch for Spoiler. However, researchers say Spoiler, “is not something you can patch easily with microcode without losing tremendous performance”. The degree of the performance penalty exacted by these patches is a good measure of the size of AMD's advantage. Intel can prevent developers from publishing their benchmark results, but they can't stop them from talking to each other. This information will get out. Investors will have to look for it on more technical websites frequented by developers.

The researchers are of the opinion that Spoiler cannot be fully fixed with a software patch. They believe changes to Intel's chip architecture will be required.

Intel's is already years behind schedule in moving from 14 nm production lines to 10 nm. In contrast, AMD will soon be making its processors on a 7 nm production line.

If Intel now also needs to redesign their processors to address Spoiler I cannot see how this can be accomplished in less than 5 years. That's enough time for AMD to take significant market share.

My Take: Intel has some tough decisions to make for their processor product line. Moving from 14 nm to 10 nm production lines requires multi-billion dollar investments with long lead-times. Changing their processor architecture at the same time compounds the problem.

Bob Swan, Intel's CEO, does not have expertise in these technical areas. He will, no doubt, have access to the best consultants in the industry, but in the end, investors have to trust the CEO to make the right decision. The fact that Intel restricts developers from publishing their benchmark results reduces my trust in them. How much performance is sapped by Intel's software patches is a key piece of information that should not be kept from investors. I cannot recommend Intel stock until Swan is more forthcoming.

In contrast, AMD was the best performing stock in the S&P 500 for 2018 with an almost 69% gain. Tony Mitchell, one of my managers, first bought AMD in October 2014 at $3.45. At today’s price of $23.50, he has already made a lot of money on his original investment and he sees a lot more upside in 2019.

After publication, an Intel spokesperson provided this statement:

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Intel received notice of this research, and we expect that software can be protected against such issues by employing side channel safe software development practices. This includes avoiding control flows that are dependent on the data of interest. We likewise expect that DRAM modules mitigated against Rowhammer style attacks remain protected. Protecting our customers and their data continues to be a critical priority for us and we appreciate the efforts of the security community for their ongoing research.

In plain English, I think Intel is laying the blame for Spoiler on software developers who don't follow "side channel safe software development practices", and manufacturers of memory modules that have not "mitigated" against this kind of attack. In my view, if Spoiler was entirely due to sub-par software and memory modules, it would affect AMD processors as well. Intel's statement does not change my take on this news.

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Posted (edited)
On 3/26/2019 at 2:10 AM, gamble said:

Anyone going with 3000 series when released? 

It will be very tempting.

 

Great article on RAM.

 

ASUS AMD X570 Motherboard Lineup Leaked

https://hothardware.com/news/asus-amd-x570-motherboard-lineup-leaked-ryzen-cpu-deals

 

ASUS ROG Strix X570-I Gaming could be the one for me, split my 32GB RAM between two systems I guess once I work out which sticks OC best.

Edited by Dasa

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13 hours ago, Dasa said:

ASUS ROG Strix X570-I Gaming could be the one for me, split my 32GB RAM between two systems I guess once I work out which sticks OC best.

 

What would be really interesting is if you could run the same timing and clocks between systems with the same sticks.   x470-I looks like has the 2 ram slots, guessing the x570-I will have the same and looking at page 4 on the techpoweredup link, should give better results for OC on ram.  I had no idea it was better to have 2 slot vs daisy chain on MB's and how t-topolgy was better for 4 sticks. 

 

 

6 hours ago, fliptopia said:

I've barely got my 2600 so I'll get strung up if I upgrade this early. 

 

2600 is a great chip, Im using 2600x and its solid for everything I do.  I really just want to get my hands on a chip with higher clocks.  There seems to be some good price drops here and there on the current 2000 series chips.   

 

My sons 2200g was great for general gaming for roblux and minecraft but once he started playing fortnite it was a bit choppy, threw in a RX 580 used off ebay and it is an impressive system for the price.  He will be getting my 6 core eventually once 3000 series releases.  That RX 580 pumps out good frames and the Nitro version stays really cool once I played with the fan curve some.  Crap overclocker though, hey I had test this out 🙂

 

I cant help to wonder how Intel responds, should have new products only a few months after 3000 launches with 10nm?   I haven't seen any delays on that, but want to support AMD, not because I dont like Intel products. 

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That's the issue with an APU, you can't really OC an APU too much as it's on the CPU which means CPU itself runs hotter as consequence (then add the issue an APU takes memory from system as well).

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