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Dasa

AMD Zen

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Memory speed is expressed without consideration of DDR.

Just ran it on my machine though without closing background stuff like WaterFox, uTorrent and a few other assorted mostly inactive applications.

 

Haswell Intel Core i7-4790 @ 3.60 GHz 1 processor, 4 cores, 8 threads

Single/multithread scores 4386 / 14670

 

Single-Core Score

4386 Crypto Score 4056 Integer Score 4552 Floating Point Score 4136 Memory Score 4472

 

Multi-Core Score

14670 Crypto Score 9179 Integer Score 18312 Floating Point Score 16627 Memory Score 4915

 

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Memory speed is expressed without consideration of DDR.

 

Oh yes.. of course.

 

I wasn't expecting the single core scores on that to be great.

Yeah... sames

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In benches I've seen the Ryzen is typically just below a Core i of the same speed.

Looking at the multicore score from GB4 - the ratio of single vs multicore for the 16 thread(ripper) is only slightly below what I got with my 4C-8T CPU.

Even though it's likely running on quad channel, you still tend to get diminishing returns in performance for each extra memory channel.

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Intel are throwing some serious shade at AMD:

 

RwDaHXuN8WtpJp17.jpg

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96vIsCsyN2OasUHT.jpg

 

 

Bit salty are we Intel? Glued together dies like Core 2 Duo and Core 2 Quad? Like AMD used to throw shade at you about hmm..?

 

But seriously? No ecosystem support? You have companies there like: IBM, Microsoft, MSI, Asus, Gigabyte, ASRock (twice), VMWare, Oracle, Cray... and many more whom AMD have partnerships and EcoSystem integration with. Intel threw in a couple more OEM's twice to make it look good... but unfortunately they've just made themselves look really stupid lol... and a little scared.

 

EDIT: Apparently "glued' is a an accepted industry term. Whether it applies in this case though is still unknown to me.. if only I could be bothered doing hours of reading/learning.

Edited by SceptreCore
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From the pic in the linked story... looks like an old 7" portable CRT TV.

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From the pic in the linked story... looks like an old 7" portable CRT TV.

Something out of Fallout

 

Kabylake-X appears to be a joke.

 

Intel is proper worried about Ryzen. Kabylake is getting a refresh by Q4 I think, while they delay Coffeelake and offer it with 6 core parts to take on Ryzen's multithreaded performance. That is will definitely bring the game to Ryzen in the same price range I reckon... maybe even priced less if Intel is aggressive.

 

Meanwhile AMD has sent Ryzen 2 off to be taped on the 7nm node... which means they will beat Intel to market with a 7nm x86 processor. Competition is definitely back in the CPU market.

 

EDIT: Skylake-X is the move to the professional space for contemporary workloads and applications. Intel has made changes to the architecture to accommodate for this.. but it has it's trade offs. It has it's plusses.

 

Chip makers are seeing a roadblock ahead of them as Moore's Law grinds to a halt. So now they have to play with architectures more and align them for best use. I would say that has a lot to do with AMD coming up to beat Intel to market with a 7nm node CPU, Intel is trying to stave off Moore's Law as long as they can through other means.

Edited by SceptreCore

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Kyzen is rumoured to be the new name of the Zen architecture on the '14nm+' silicon node, releasing before "Zen 2" on the 7nm node. However... because Globalfoundries says nothing about 14nm+ on their website... and TSMC having nothing one their website, it may not eventuate. It could only come from Globalfoundries as the 14nm+ node technology is said to have been contributed to IBM who spun off their fabs to GF and add technology to their cooperative partnership.

 

Kyzen%20Trademark%20Screenshot.jpg

 

One name we can be relatively confident about is Kyzen. AMD have already mentioned in their roadmap they’ll be releasing a 14nm+ refresh of the Zen architecture. Given its one letter difference from Ryzen and its similarity to the Japanese word ‘Kaizen’, a term for continuous improvement, it’s fair to say Kyzen will likely be the name for these updated chips.
Yields for the current Ryzen chips are rumoured to be really solid already, at over 80%, but the 14nm+ update could potentially see this raised even higher. The refresh will likely also feature higher clock speeds, better energy efficiency and possibly higher overclocking potential. Crucially, AMD will also have improved the existing chips’ microcode by then, making for better memory compatibility. Genuine new features are likely to be saved until the second-generation 7nm Zen architecture comes along next year.

 

Take all this with the usual pinch of pink Himalayan rock salt or gluten free chicken salt... what ever you prefer.

Edited by SceptreCore

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another look at memory performance on ryzen

they actually got 4x16g running 2933c18 stable using asus b350 prime a $150 mb and show that it improves performance by up to 4% in bf1 vs 2x8g at the same speed

 

funny thing is witcher 3 which gains the most from running 2x8g 3200 vs 2133 actually loses performance from 4x16g which doesn't really add up unless the gains are from having over 16g ram not a speed difference from 4 double sided dimms

4 double sided dimms should be faster but its possible sub timings had to be significantly relaxed to make it stable to the point where its actually slower

https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?act=url&depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com.au&sl=auto&sp=nmt4&tl=en&u=http://pclab.pl/art73566.html&usg=ALkJrhjo0xAHXOJ8eyaNUIJ3unMDPGD2mA

Edited by Dasa

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nother look at memory performance on ryzen

they actually got 4x16g running 2933c18 stable using asus b350 prime a $150 mb and show that it improves performance by up to 4% in bf1 vs 2x8g at the same speed

 

funny thing is witcher 3 which gains the most from running 2x8g 3200 vs 2133 actually loses performance from 4x16g which doesn't really add up unless the gains are from having over 16g ram not a speed difference from 4 double sided dimms

4 double sided dimms should be faster but its possible sub timings had to be significantly relaxed to make it stable to the point where its actually slower

https://translate.googleusercontent.com/translate_c?act=url&depth=1&hl=en&ie=UTF8&prev=_t&rurl=translate.google.com.au&sl=auto&sp=nmt4&tl=en&u=http://pclab.pl/art73566.html&usg=ALkJrhjo0xAHXOJ8eyaNUIJ3unMDPGD2mA

 

From what I've seen it's almost negligible... the scaling of Ryzen with faster RAM. I'd say that games still aren't optimized for the platform and that decision really lies in the hands of the developer whether they do or not.

Edited by SceptreCore

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I doubt amd will allow us to unlock the disabled cores on those ryzen 3s though.

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Chances are they're low binned dies with a higher proportion of nonworking cores on a particular wafer.

So, you'd probably have a certain %age that are just tosssed due to total fail, then ones with at least one faulty core.

Then others with marginal cores disabled, then probably the bulk of the wafer with all cores passed with some disabled simply for the sake of making up the numbers.

 

My guess is they're probably not even physically wired in fully so will be impossible to use.

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I doubt amd will allow us to unlock the disabled cores on those ryzen 3s though.

 

Chances are they're low binned dies with a higher proportion of nonworking cores on a particular wafer.

So, you'd probably have a certain %age that are just tosssed due to total fail, then ones with at least one faulty core.

Then others with marginal cores disabled, then probably the bulk of the wafer with all cores passed with some disabled simply for the sake of making up the numbers.

 

My guess is they're probably not even physically wired in fully so will be impossible to use.

According to reports some outlets have been getting, Ryzen has been yielding well so far. Mostly due in part to sacrificial Polaris GPU cleaning the 14nm pipe for Zen and Vega.

 

So I'd say there'd be a fair amount of core disabling, or at least will be in future when demand rises, but waiting to launch Ryzen 3 last is a good way to shift tossed parts that didn't make the 5 or 7 bin.

 

As to unlocking those cores, There's no way to know if AMD disabled them irrecoverably, or if they can be accessed by a future BIOS update. I would say it's unlikely though... I just don't think AMD is interested in taking that route again. My opinion.

I've totally taken over Dasa's page lol.

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I avoid buying systems with those amd a series and i3 intels for work. I guess the ryzen 3 would be acceptable but at the moment, its either i5 or i7 at the moment

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Their APUs are underwhelming and the other big turnoff is that they're on a different socket format.

At least with an i3 you've got the upgrade path right there - just put a quad core in it's place though like you say, it's questionable logic buying an i3 to begin with. If you're doing an office drone, you'd probably be better off just using a Pentium.

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I've had mixed results from the Bulldozer based excavator core APU's. The Desktop version is fine, the mobile part is woeful... but for some reason OEM's love/d them.

 

Their APUs are underwhelming and the other big turnoff is that they're on a different socket format.

At least with an i3 you've got the upgrade path right there - just put a quad core in it's place though like you say, it's questionable logic buying an i3 to begin with. If you're doing an office drone, you'd probably be better off just using a Pentium.

Thankfully Ryzen APU's will be AM4 socket compatible as well as adapted for mobile package.

 

AMD has confirmed a 4 core/8 thread "Raven Ridge" APU coming. So we could expect Ryzen 5 performance with some added Vega graphics... not bad hey? They're rumoured to also have some core tweaks that Zen 2 will come with. So maybe a 1-5% performance gain conservatively speaking?

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I think the OEMs like them because they're cheap and on paper look impressive (specs-wise, not benchmark-wise). But when it comes down to it, they get trounced by an i5 running at under 2/3rds the clock speed and with less "cores".

 

The best thing AMD could do is replace all such embarassing product lines ASFP.

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Sorry... Here's the link


I think the OEMs like them because they're cheap and on paper look impressive (specs-wise, not benchmark-wise). But when it comes down to it, they get trounced by an i5 running at under 2/3rds the clock speed and with less "cores".

 

The best thing AMD could do is replace all such embarassing product lines ASFP.

I don't know about that Bags... they do internal product testing and that jazz. Price was certainly a consideration. But those Bulldozer based cores were barely cores... they were half sized crap. And the lower spec models barely run a system.

 

These Zen cores will change the game, but they will be out some time the latter part of this year. Or early 2018.. something like that.

Edited by SceptreCore

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That's what I mean - they say stuff like "6 processing and 4 graphics cores, clock speed of 3.8 GHz" etc etc. but the thing has no grunt.

 

I did some work on an A10 earlier in the year. Crappy feeling HP laptop with a big screen but the thing had the Fisher Price feel about it and including the bloatware and package deal crap cost something like $1,300 from Harvey Norman. I think I wrote down some bench results somewhere... but was not impressed at all by the thing.

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Are the Zen mobile parts going to be competitive with the intel mobile parts from an energy efficiency POV? Because that's why I've always shunned mobile AMD.

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