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SonOfNoddy

Online or free Java editor

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Hey. Are there any free Java editors out there? It can be online, on OSX or Windows. I would just like something I can practice what I learned on. Any help would be appreciated.

Edited by SonOfNoddy

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Notepad++

 

Look, Java, like any computer language, is just text - the compiler (or interpreter) is the bit that does the magic. As such, you could use any damn text editor you want - from edlin up to emacs. However, Notepad++ is a nice piece of gear that handles colour-coding for many languages, and it's free.

 

https://notepad-plus-plus.org/

 

 

 

Wait - it was just an editor you were looking for, right? Because you're still going to need an interpreter to make it work. Get that from https://www.java.com/en/download/

Edited by Cybes
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Notepad++

 

Look, Java, like any computer language, is just text - the compiler (or interpreter) is the bit that does the magic. As such, you could use any damn text editor you want - from edlin up to emacs. However, Notepad++ is a nice piece of gear that handles colour-coding for many languages, and it's free.

 

https://notepad-plus-plus.org/

 

 

 

Wait - it was just an editor you were looking for, right? Because you're still going to need an interpreter to make it work. Get that from https://www.java.com/en/download/

Thanks, and I already have java...can't run Minecraft without it!

 

IntelliJ IDEA is the de facto standard for Java development.

https://www.jetbrains.com/idea/

I'll check it out, thanks.

Edited by SonOfNoddy

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You can code Java apps in VS2015? I thought they removed that ability when they decided to get rid of J# way back a decade ago. Though recommending VS2015 and doing some non Java development is a good idea hahahaha

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I'll second Notepad ++. I use it for FAR more than just coding though.

 

Has anyone mentioned Eclipse yet? I used to quite like it when I was doing Java at uni.

 

https://eclipse.org/downloads/

 

Eclipse *was* on my mac when I got it, about 1.125 years ago...but since then it's been wiped once and the HDD has died, so I no longer has eclipse ;-; i'm also to lazy to download it again :P

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I'll second Notepad ++. I use it for FAR more than just coding though.

 

Has anyone mentioned Eclipse yet? I used to quite like it when I was doing Java at uni.

 

https://eclipse.org/downloads/

Notepad ++ is a useful editor in coding and I can also use it for other programming languages that I used.

 

Eclipse is also a nice application

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I'll second Notepad ++. I use it for FAR more than just coding though.

 

Has anyone mentioned Eclipse yet? I used to quite like it when I was doing Java at uni.

 

https://eclipse.org/downloads/

Notepad ++ is a useful editor in coding and I can also use it for other programming languages that I used.

 

Eclipse is also a nice application

 

 

Thanks for the advice!

 

We're a pretty close-knit bunch here these days, how about an Introduction thread in 'The Green Room' so we can all welcome you properly and learn a little about a new person who (for once) doesnt seem like a bot :)

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What platform are you using? I'm asking because obviously there are different tools available for Linux (my favourite for any sort of development), Windows (sometimes the best choice for developing for Windows) and Mac (vomit).

 

Regardless of your choice of platform, you'll need to install the Java API, Netbeans or Eclipse to get started. As has been touched on above, the way that Java works (and the way that it gets its highly-versatile cross-platform compatibility) is through the use of an interpreter. Basically, you write the source code using whatever text editor you want (e.g. Notepad). However, for the source code to run, you need to first build it into a .class file, which is then run through an interpreter. The interpreter does the work of translating the .class file into machine code that the operating system can understand and execute - it does this on-the-fly, so provided that you have Java installed on whatever machine you're using, the same code should run on whatever operating system you're using without needing recompiling.

 

My preference for writing and editing source code is to use a program that has some colour-coding and basic sanity checks built into it (like Notepad++ for Windows or GNOME TextEditor for Linux). TextEditor supports a very wide range of programming and scripting languages - you change a setting to the language that you are using for any specific file and your source code will be colour-coded in accordance with the syntactic rules and specific keywords that apply in that language. This is very useful for debugging and for fixing typos and syntax errors - e.g. if you forget a bracket or to close a comment block, then the mistake should be obvious from the colour change that this produces. GNOME TextEditor also has the added advantage of already being installed on any Linux box running the GNOME Desktop Environment, so there is no need to download and install any additional software. Being open-source, it is also free and does not come with spyware or other such bullshit.

 

Good luck!

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What platform are you using? I'm asking because obviously there are different tools available for Linux (my favourite for any sort of development), Windows (sometimes the best choice for developing for Windows) and Mac (vomit).

 

Regardless of your choice of platform, you'll need to install the Java API, Netbeans or Eclipse to get started. As has been touched on above, the way that Java works (and the way that it gets its highly-versatile cross-platform compatibility) is through the use of an interpreter. Basically, you write the source code using whatever text editor you want (e.g. Notepad). However, for the source code to run, you need to first build it into a .class file, which is then run through an interpreter. The interpreter does the work of translating the .class file into machine code that the operating system can understand and execute - it does this on-the-fly, so provided that you have Java installed on whatever machine you're using, the same code should run on whatever operating system you're using without needing recompiling.

 

My preference for writing and editing source code is to use a program that has some colour-coding and basic sanity checks built into it (like Notepad++ for Windows or GNOME TextEditor for Linux). TextEditor supports a very wide range of programming and scripting languages - you change a setting to the language that you are using for any specific file and your source code will be colour-coded in accordance with the syntactic rules and specific keywords that apply in that language. This is very useful for debugging and for fixing typos and syntax errors - e.g. if you forget a bracket or to close a comment block, then the mistake should be obvious from the colour change that this produces. GNOME TextEditor also has the added advantage of already being installed on any Linux box running the GNOME Desktop Environment, so there is no need to download and install any additional software. Being open-source, it is also free and does not come with spyware or other such bullshit.

 

Good luck!

Thanks for the info dude, and welcome back to Atomic! As a certain other Atomican would say cybes "Take a seat by the fire, there's plenty of spaces"

Edited by SonOfNoddy

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