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Camsie

What's the best security package out there?

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After several years of being a happy customer with Nortons, it seems I will be placing my digital security in someone else's hands next year. Long story short, the latest version of Nortons causes crashes in numerous legit programs like Internet Explorer and MS Word. This has been going on since October and Nortons hasn't done squat about it. I've managed to lock the program into an old, obsolete version while I ride out my license term, but this glitch, on top of other dissatisfactions has prompted me to look elsewhere for my security needs in 2016.

 

So, what does everyone reccommend? I'm looking for something that offers top-notch protection against viruses, obviously, while also having a great track record in not interfering with legitimate computer activity (i.e. not causing errors, or showing a lot of "false positives"). I really need something that comes in a bundle with at least 5 device licenses which can cover both Windows and Android devices. And I'm really hoping to get something that still supports WinXP as I've got an old PC that still gets use and I'd rather it be secure then not.

 

I hear good things about Kaspersky, but I sometimes wonder if the hype isn't just paid PR from the company itself. Does anyone here use it? What's your verdict on it?

 

Also, I'd like to steer away from "cloud-based" security suites as I want to be able to keep my PCs secure even when they are offline.

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I switched from AVG to Avast when it started pestering me to buy it after 1 year free.

 

I find it not too obtrusive or resource hungry and you can tone down the amount of 'net nannying it performs.

Throw in Firefox with Adblock and that's covering a lot of the bases.

 

Personally I don't see the point of having something over your shoulder with Office applications and the like. In most cases a dodgy document file will arrive as unsolicited spam/scam email and you'll pick it anyway, or just have your scanner set to check email attachments.

 

These all in one suites I've never had time for, they tend to be aimed at people who know SFA about computers and in many cases cause just as much harm as a virus attack anyway in that they can bring a fast machine to it's knees just by doing it's so-called job.

 

That said though, things are going too far the other way in that viruses and malware can be treated as distinctly seperate entities and necessitate the use of a second scanner such as Malwarebytes Anti-Malware.

I've not checked other popular tools like the scanner MS offers. Generally I don't really have much problem with attacks, a lot of it comes down to not doing things in the first place that invites them in and choice of browser has a big bearing there.

Edited by Rybags

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I switched from AVG to Avast when it started pestering me to buy it after 1 year free.

 

I find it not too obtrusive or resource hungry and you can tone down the amount of 'net nannying it performs.

Throw in Firefox with Adblock and that's covering a lot of the bases.

 

Personally I don't see the point of having something over your shoulder with Office applications and the like. In most cases a dodgy document file will arrive as unsolicited spam/scam email and you'll pick it anyway, or just have your scanner set to check email attachments.

 

These all in one suites I've never had time for, they tend to be aimed at people who know SFA about computers and in many cases cause just as much harm as a virus attack anyway in that they can bring a fast machine to it's knees just by doing it's so-called job.

 

That said though, things are going too far the other way in that viruses and malware can be treated as distinctly seperate entities and necessitate the use of a second scanner such as Malwarebytes Anti-Malware.

I've not checked other popular tools like the scanner MS offers. Generally I don't really have much problem with attacks, a lot of it comes down to not doing things in the first place that invites them in and choice of browser has a big bearing there.

Problem being that I need whatever suite I get to protect myself and my family, some of whom are not very computer savvy and are just as likely to click on a dodgy link thinking it's something legitimate.

 

I've also got a family member who receives tons of those chain emails that often come with attachments and I'd like some piece of mind knowing that our computers are protected from anything nasty coming in that way.

 

You mentioned being averse to buying a security suite. I should probably mention that I am not averse to paying for something if it does the job it's meant to. I'd rather pay for a top-quality security suite then risk having something nasty sneak past the radar of a cheap substitute.

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use avg or avast and pay for malwarebytes anti malware

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Some ISPs provide email filtering before it hits your inbox. But it usually needs some tuning - there'll be false positives you'll need to let through and some spam will still make it as well.

Bad stuff in email can be much more than Com/Exe or executable within or disguised as Zip. Screen savers, document files are other means to carry the payload.

 

Or just the mere fact you read an email and allow embedded images to load - they can track your IP then, but I don't think it's a very common method of attack. It only shows that you exist on an IP and that you've viewed what they sent to you.

 

Previously mentioned Ad blocking on browsers also goes a long way - that'll stop most inadvertant clicks that dump you in the hands of attacker's sites.

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Problem being that I need whatever suite I get to protect myself and my family, some of whom are not very computer savvy and are just as likely to click on a dodgy link thinking it's something legitimate.

 

DEFINATELY avast then.

It acts like a 'proxy' for everything, literally everything, that goes in or out your network interface, meaning very little is missed.

I like AVIRA personally, because its lighter and has slightly better detection rates, but when it comes to a 'do it all' package, AVAST cant be beat.

 

Also, if the things you're worried about ALL come from the web browser, consider learning how to sandbox the web browser, so they'll never be at risk, antivirus or not.

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use avg or avast and pay for malwarebytes anti malware

 

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/avg-extension-browser-history,news-21936.html?cmpid=559256_20151230_56804686&adbid=10153125664962000&adbpl=fb&adbpr=22359506999

 

Stay clear of AVG i use it as i been using it for years. Getting a new PC soon and probably get Bit Defender or Avira.

 

AVG are spies.

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I have found Kaspersky to be ok and I have several IT support customers using it too with no problems.

 

I've also got a family member who receives tons of those chain emails that often come with attachments

Time to force them to get a new email address and dump the spammed one altogether.

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Try Panda it's lightweight cloud storage, have a strong detection in viruses and it is also free

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Panda got a decent reviews back days but it won't hurt a try. If you are a windows user you can try the microsoft essentials.

Edited by Nicxh

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Panda got a decent reviews back days but it won't hurt a try. Even though if you are a windows user you can try the microsoft essentials.

 

excuse the rudeness,

 

But who are you?

and is english your second language?

 

Very happy to have new faces! Welcome!

But, I dont think I've met you before :)

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Microsoft Essentials isn't the best at picking malware, one of the worst. It doesn't have a high rate of false positives though. It doesn't update itself reliably

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AVG are spies.

 

avast isnt any better

https://malwaretips.com/threads/avast-antivirus-was-spying-on-you-with-adware-until-this-week.35704/

nor is google or microsoft

 

 

Seems like you cannot trust anyone with your data ,now the NSP in US was shutdown its looks like the worms are being killed off. SInce AVG where caught updates are very rare ,as they used to download tracking files.

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If you're serious about security, you might want to consider switching to Linux. Most viruses, malware, trojans, etc are designed for Windows machines and won't affect Linux systems, so this in itself cuts out a lot of threats. However, you need to be careful about picking the right distribution with the right security features and add-ons for your needs, verify the integrity of the files you download and spend lots of time setting it up to get it working correctly. However, once set up properly, you'll have a far more secure system than any Windows machine.

 

If you do need to use Windows for any reason, I find that different antivirus packages sometimes detect different threats. I've variously used combinations of Norton, AVG, BitDefender (cloud-updated but still works offline) and McAfee. Even though having two such programs running may be draining, they don't both always need to be running. Whichever one you have on most of the time is up to you; many of the paid-for options seem to be much of a muchness to me.

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