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oculus rift!

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Not just latency , some elimination of vertigo /motion sickness can come from blending scan lines from frame to frame which would cause less perceived chop and dither from the available frame-rate.

 

yeah, boosting the perceived framerate is to some extent about comfort for the eyes which is a factor in itself, but it also works to reduce the instrumental factor of latency.

 

a fairly crappy progressive framerate with zero latency in the signal chain otherwise, would not produce a great deal of motion sickness during slow head movements. the time between each draw at 60fps would be an acceptably low 16ms. but as soon as you add wild head movements youve got an effective latency that is far higher, with a lagging image from your old head position arriving too late and hanging around too long, and some degree of horrible judder/flicker depending on the persistence of the pixels.

 

a "backwards" step like interlacing can effectively increase the framerate, allowing for a fuzzy kind of temporal smoothing across frames and a more constant and comfortable brightness level. another cool hack theyve worked on for smoothing is allowing late bypassing of the pixel pipeline during fast panning head movements in favour of displaying (parts of?) previous fully rendered frames shifted in position by just the right amount.

 

Can I use this as a normal 2D monitor?

 

Having my shitty eyes work independantly would be a godsend.

 

definitely not with the first generation. you would probably need at least 4K per eye for that.

 

at the moment its really important for devs to limit the smallest size that UI text is displayed -- owing to the degradation of the "screen door effect" which is caused by the relatively 'large' pixels and dot pitches.

 

having said that, i imagine there is a sweet spot at the right focal point where it might be okay to simulate looking at a really fucking big monitor from across a room.

Edited by @~thehung

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Ive just took my rig into the shop to get him to bring it upto oculus rift specs, gonna get a new mobo, geforce 970 and got a new 27" benq gaming monitor for starwars haha.

 

ill hold off for a few months on the rift, if it gets good reviews ill add another 970 to SLI. i read nvida are using sli tech so to use 1 card per eye which would be a good performance increase.

 

yeeiw

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Its PS talk but its a guide for developers, the things that need to be implemented, and problems that need to be solved.

 

All vr has the same issues and will need to solve them so most of of it is not PS specific , it pretty technical at times, but good for helping

one to understand a bit more about the nature and development of VR.

 

Edited by Waltish
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Facebook's Oculus must pay $500m in virtual reality lawsuit

Jury determined that VR company’s CEO Palmer Luckey failed to comply with a non-disclosure agreement with games company ZeniMax

The Facebook-owned company Oculus has been ordered to pay half a billion dollars to the games company ZeniMax after a jury determined that the Oculus CEO, Palmer Luckey, failed to comply with a non-disclosure agreement.

ZeniMax sued the virtual reality startup in May 2014, months after it was acquired by Facebook. The game maker alleged Oculus had improperly used code from ZeniMax to build it’s Rift VR headset.

ZeniMax is the parent company of ID Software, maker of the Doom and Quake games, whose co-founder John Carmack is now the chief technology officer of Oculus. Luckey exchanged emails with Carmack, who was still at ID Software, when he was developing a prototype of the company’s flagship headset.

Oculus plans to appeal the decision and said that the company was committed to the “long-term success of VR”.

The news came as Facebook announced a 51% jump in its fourth-quarter revenue, driven by its mobile advertising business, which accounted for 84% of revenue. Bad publicity over fake news failed to leave any mark on the quarter, which ended 31 December. Revenues rose to $8.81bn and Facebook’s quarterly profit more than doubled to $3.57bn, from $1.56bn a year earlier. Some 1.86 billion people were active on Facebook at the end of December, up 17% from a year earlier.

In short, Facebook can afford the $500m.

During closing arguments, ZeniMax’s attorney called for a much larger award – $2bn in compensation and $2bn in damages. Oculus’s attorney, Beth Wilkinson, argued that the lawsuit was driven by jealousy and anger, not facts.

During the three-week trial, Facebook’s chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, testified, characterizing the plaintiffs as opportunists.

“It’s pretty common when you announce a big deal that people just come out of the woodwork and claim they own some part of the deal,” he said.

The case was tried in a district court in the north district of Texas. Of the $500m, Luckey will have to pay $50m in the lawsuit, while the former Oculus CEO Brendan Iribe has been ordered to pay $150m – both for false designation. The company must also pay $200m for non-disclosure agreement (NDA) violation, $50m for copyright infringement and $50m for false designation. The jury decided that Oculus didn’t steal trade secrets, as alleged by ZeniMax.

“The heart of this case was about whether Oculus stole ZeniMax’s trade secrets, and the jury found decisively in our favor,” an Oculus spokeswoman said in a statement.

“We’re obviously disappointed by a few other aspects of today’s verdict, but we are undeterred. Oculus products are built with Oculus technology. Our commitment to the long-term success of VR remains the same, and the entire team will continue the work they’ve done since day one – developing VR technology that will transform the way people interact and communicate. We look forward to filing our appeal and eventually putting this litigation behind us.”

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John Carmack should have been smarter...

 

I'm torn, cos I am a huge fan of Zenimax titles, but, heck, they let this slip through their fingers, for whatever reason, and this will stifle future development.

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I reckon ZeniMax sued when FB bought Oculus because they knew FB had the money and Oculus didn't before getting bought out.

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​as i understand it, although Carmack admitted to taking files containing code, nothing has come of that. Carmack: "Oculus uses zero lines of code that I wrote while under contract to Zenimax."

​the result all centres around the breach of the NDA by Luckey.

and ​yeah, it was a dastardly cash grab. there was nary any IP theft speak of, let alone any concrete evidence. its quite telling that a big part of the reason Carmack left Id was to pursue the work on VR that he was actively discouraged from and/or not permitted to pursue at Id. then there is the dodgy timing of the lawsuit...

Edited by @~thehung

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I'm not that interested in the Oculus anyway. I much prefer the Vive.

 

But it's not likely I'm gonna afford either for a while. I do have a PSVR, and when you add it up (PS4 + PSVR + Camera + Moves) it clocks in at over $1k anyway.

 

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Edited by smadge1

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yes, the oculus is looking less and less desirable.

last month the CEO of Epic Games (maker of the Unreal engine) claimed "HTC Vive is outselling Oculus Rift 2-to-1 worldwide" and although theres no published sales figures for either, he is an insider whose company is currently developing at least one big title for oculus. and he went on to wave is finger at the closed platform approach they have been taking. at least they did eventually reverse the firmware update they issued mid last year that crippled the use of ReVive (a software that allows Vive users to play Oculus titles).

but most of all this:

but, at this point its hard to see Facebook's offering trumping Valve's in terms of motion tracking. the option of 'room scale' movement is compelling. so too, is the boundless extensibility of the Lighthouse system.


oculus' solution for full 360 room scale tracking is hampered by the need for individual USB 3.0 cables snaking around to 2-3 IR cameras (3 if you want non-flakey performance similar to the vive) which is physically cumbersome in addition to the extra CPU and power load. by comparison, with the Vive you need 2 Lighthouse boxes which plug in at the mains, and thats it.

my point about extensibility: theres hardly any limit to the amount of new items that can be tracked perfectly by Vive's Lighthouse without any significant performance hit. the oculus is miles behind in this regard. and we are now starting to see what can be done:


HTC Announces Vive Tracker to Power Next Generation VR Accessories

HTC announced a brand new component for its Vive family of virtual reality products.

Screen-Shot-2017-01-04-at-4.19.37-PM-100

 

The new addition revealed at CES 2017 is known as the “Vive Tracker” and its purpose is to give developers the opportunity to more easily turn ordinary objects into objects that can be tracked in VR using the Vive’s “lighthouse” tracking system. The Vive Tracker is said to begin shipping commercially in Q2 this year. A price will be announced, “as we move closer to the shipping date,” according to HTC’s general manager for Vive, Daniel O’Brien.

O’Brien announced the Vive Tracker during a press conference and during his remarks he explained “[the Vive tracker was] built from the ground up just like the [Vive] VR headset we use today, built to work with SteamVR tracking.”

As far as official specs go, the Vive Tracker measures 10 cm in length across its face, which is just shy of a standard Vive controller’s head. It is said to boast six hours of battery life in constant use and has a screw hole for easy installation onto the object of your choice.

The Vive Tracker gives developers a two pronged approach for playing inside the lines of the Vive’s tracking system. According to O’Brien, “Now we have two solutions. Developers can learn how to build for our system through our ongoing Synapse training online, and now they also have the ability to work with us by building with a Vive Tracker.”

After the press conference O’Brien discussed the design of the Vive Tracker with UploadVR, stating that its unique shape was designed “so that it could be spotted from the most angles possible,” and that internally the Vive Tracker is “essentially what’s packed into the standard controller.”

The HTC press room also had a myriad of booths set up where developers could showcase their Vive creations, many of which were utilizing their shiny new Vive Trackers. Just at this session alone we saw a baseball bat, machine gun, and wireless controller gloves that were all working on Vive thanks to this new tracker. We will have more detailed updates on those experiences as the week goes on but for now the news is that Vive is ready to expand: one hockey puck at a time.

Edited by @~thehung

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I know bugger all about the currrent VR offerings, but I did get to have a play about a month ago.

 

Just picking on a couple of points above on Oculus Rift..

 

The current controller is much more natural to use and it only took me a few minutes before I got the hang of it.

 

Yes, the IR sensors require USB 3 cables, but I didn't see that as a big problem given that it's not something you generally move around. I used a 3 sensor setup and it was very accurate.

 

Price point - my understanding is that to get Oculus Rift up and running costs considerably less, in the order of $500-$600

 

As I said, my experience is very limited, but I didn't see the cables being as big an issue as the controller or price point.

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Yes, the IR sensors require USB 3 cables, but I didn't see that as a big problem given that it's not something you generally move around. I used a 3 sensor setup and it was very accurate.

some people have issues with the availability of free ports, and need to add new cards/bays. optimal setup: 3x USB3.0 + 1xUSB2.0. thats a lot of throughput and power draw, and there have been many reports of glitches with hubs and USB extension leads.

 

plus, depending on the limitations of your room, its extra clutter to not trip over.

Price point - my understanding is that to get Oculus Rift up and running costs considerably less, in the order of $500-$600

it depends what you mean by up and running.

 

for roughly comparable set ups as of (link) October 16: "You'll still have to pay shipping if you want to order the Rift and Touch controllers as a bundle, of course. That bundle will set you back a flat $US1000 (~$1319) including shipping and other fees. That's marginally less than what a Vive will cost you right now ($US1019, or $1344 with shipping and taxes), but probably not enough to influence people one way or another."

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yeah my pricing is only based on the dude who built the systems about 6 months ago.

 

I trust his judgement but I know bugger all detail :)

 

I think it's a very fluid situation at the moment and we might end up with a VHS vs BetaMAX situation. The business cut and thrust might have a bigger impact than the quality of the tech.

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yeah my pricing is only based on the dude who built the systems about 6 months ago.

 

I trust his judgement but I know bugger all detail :)

 

I think it's a very fluid situation at the moment and we might end up with a VHS vs BetaMAX situation. The business cut and thrust might have a bigger impact than the quality of the tech.

 

yeah, its been fluid for several years now, and it may stay fluid for several more. what some enthusiasts tend to forget is that as it stands no company has made a concerted push to establish a beach head in the mass market. despite the fact that three juggernauts Facebook(Oculus) / HTC+Valve (Vive) / Sony (PSVR) have visibly entered the early adoption fray, the status quo of VR tech is still very much on the periphery for average consumers, and awareness of the offerings of each brand is splintered across large variously overlapping niches.

 

VHS vs BetaMAX?

 

yes, in that the Oculus and Vive will remain the two dominant players on the cutting edge for a while, with less chance that console based platforms can mature quickly enough to wow the masses in the mid-term — being that their limitations are tied to the development cycles of the consoles themselves. current PlayStation VR is just not in the same league as the big two. and as for mobile phone based forms...Samsung+Oculus' GearVR, despite its worthiness as an individual product, in its current state its like a side-project that provides a watered-down experience. it has the power to either help or hinder the Oculus brand. having said that, mass market adoption of both Oculus and Vive might be severely retarded by the cost of entry ($2000 PC + $1300 VR equip.) for quite some time.

 

Valve has pushed for open standards from the start, whereas Oculus has been fooling around with a walled garden approach. Valve has championed OSVR (open standard VR) alongside SteamVR from the start. they announced the Lighthouse system as licensable from day one (which Oculus — unless they have something cool up their sleeves — might be wise to adopt). soon, you will see the proliferation of headsets and peripherals from multiple third party manufacturers. perhaps all or most alternate brand headsets will be flashes in the pan, but all activity on the open side of the equation could bolster Vive/Steam in a way that makes this more like an iOS vs Android battle. Oculus's business practices have revealed their aspirations to be the Apple of VR, but no company becomes Apple overnight, and its worth noting that the iPhone never debuted against cut-throat competition.

 

in the last year or so Oculus have been hurt by; the delayed release of their touch controllers (which most likely hampered uptake and certainly placed a number of developers who never wanted to target gamepad (XBOX) controllers in a bind), their arguably less capable 1st generation tracking system, and an online store with teething problems. Oculus' main strength, however, has been their early focus on getting a lot of AAA content made, which means they have more fully-fledged games and less of the gimmicky short experiences that litter the Steam store. the very refined digital distribution platform that is Steam, is of course, a massive strength for the Vive. but when Zuckerfuck decides to really leverage the reach of Facebook...all bets are off.

 

but you never know, Sony might avenge Betamax and do a VHS on everyone else with PSVR in the sense that most consumers dont care about technical superiority.

 

---

i wrote most of that months ago, but havent followed developments since. probably never posted coz i wanted to say something about Microsoft. but for years it hasnt been clear wtf MS is up to. here's a link that isnt too old: https://www.cnet.com/au/news/microsoft-acer-vr-mixed-reality-headset-developer-gdc-mwc-2017/

Edited by @~thehung

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Microsoft are about to come out swinging in the Console space with the Scorpio, and you'd think that it'd have the muscle to handle a bit of VR as well, but I haven't heard a peep about it yet.

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