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oculus rift!

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Hey all! long time no chats :)

 

Not sure if i put this topic in the right forum, i thought for awhile but since this topic could go into Audio & Display,Portable & Mobile Tech,Gaming,Photography & Video,Design & Coding and Tech Talk i thought id just dump it here.

 

So as yall may know, https://www.oculus.com/en-us/rift/ has released their flagship VR device and i dont know what to do!

 

its expensive, requires a super computer and looks awesome

 

Theres alot of hype about it but how much should we be buying into? its not beneath me to upgrade my rig to support it but will i ragret it?

 

Whats are your thoughts on this on any level? is it for gaming? is the video amazing ? is it well designed? is it a fad?

 

sorry for all the questions but this annoucment hit me right in the max power computing.

 

Happy new years BTW!

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My PC meets all the min reqs. I probably won't be able to justify (the price - including a controller which I don't have - seems reasonable enough, it's moreso lack of time to use it) buying until next year, when hopefully there'll be a gen 2 device out.

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Does it have titanfall?

 

Not that i saw, that would be sweet tho!

 

My PC meets all the min reqs. I probably won't be able to justify (the price - including a controller which I don't have - seems reasonable enough, it's moreso lack of time to use it) buying until next year, when hopefully there'll be a gen 2 device out.

Time is scary, im in my 30s, single, no kids. Is playing on VR what i should be spending my life on.... i kinda think so haha.

 

waiting for a few very indepth reviews might be worth it. But is this rift Gen1? they have made heaps of attempts at VR in the past. All shit, but this one seems to be "the one"

 

Has anyone seen any places giving demo's of the equipment? im looking at buying a radeon R9 390x atm . im interested in playing starwars battlefront in 4k too

 

oh technology, i love you :)

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I tried one of these a while back. Demo was a roller coaster ride, pretty basic graphics. Even so, I felt nauseated from motion sickness for about half an hour.

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I tried one of these a while back. Demo was a roller coaster ride, pretty basic graphics. Even so, I felt nauseated from motion sickness for about half an hour.

 

a VR headset or specifically this model of oculus rift? i tried some samsung one which was a solid 6/10. Did feel the motion sickness tho which im worried the rift may induce

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I tried one of these a while back. Demo was a roller coaster ride, pretty basic graphics. Even so, I felt nauseated from motion sickness for about half an hour.

 

a VR headset or specifically this model of oculus rift? i tried some samsung one which was a solid 6/10. Did feel the motion sickness tho which im worried the rift may induce

 

It was about six months ago, so it was probably an Oculus DK2

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I tried one of these a while back. Demo was a roller coaster ride, pretty basic graphics. Even so, I felt nauseated from motion sickness for about half an hour.

 

a VR headset or specifically this model of oculus rift? i tried some samsung one which was a solid 6/10. Did feel the motion sickness tho which im worried the rift may induce

 

It was about six months ago, so it was probably an Oculus DK2

 

 

Do you know if that had the same system requirements as the rift? the GFX needed to run the rift is pretty high end, i was even wondering if its worth waiting for 1 more gen of gfx to be released

 

I'd wait until they iron the bugs out it ...

 

yeah usually thats a good idea, ive read conflicting reports as to how buggy it is tho. There doesnt seem to be that big a selection of media for it atm either. I just really really want it now but haha. but dont want to get over excited and have my first impressions ruined by bugs

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1080 x 1200 per eye and 90 Hz refresh. So that's a fair amount of rendering power required.

I imagine like just about all games, few will keep up to the full refresh rate.

In theory any card able to meet the HDMI output requirements and output 2 independant displays would work with it, but doing VR with a slideshow would be a pretty crappy experience.

Edited by Rybags
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I tried one of these a while back. Demo was a roller coaster ride, pretty basic graphics. Even so, I felt nauseated from motion sickness for about half an hour.

 

a VR headset or specifically this model of oculus rift? i tried some samsung one which was a solid 6/10. Did feel the motion sickness tho which im worried the rift may induce

 

It was about six months ago, so it was probably an Oculus DK2

 

 

Do you know if that had the same system requirements as the rift? the GFX needed to run the rift is pretty high end, i was even wondering if its worth waiting for 1 more gen of gfx to be released

Wouldn't have a clue. It was a boutique gaming shop, so all machines on display were high end, beyond that I couldn't tell you anything.

 

I'd wait til its released and see how software develops around it. Might it also be useful for so called 4D and 5D cinema viewing? There is a 4D youtube video for a new Ghost in the Shell movie where you can look around with the arrow keys.

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I tried one of these a while back. Demo was a roller coaster ride, pretty basic graphics. Even so, I felt nauseated from motion sickness for about half an hour.

That's not something one can fix in hardware: your eyes are telling you one thing, and your inner ear something else. The only way to fix it is to not go for the "freak out" in the first place, which puts a large crimp in things. Initially, anyway, because most people can become less sensitive with training/exposure.

 

Even ordinary monitors can trigger the reaction, and they have multiple very large and obviously cues that the apparent motion is not real - the monitor bezel, the desk under it, the keyboard in front of it, etc.

 

Source: instrument pilot training, and living with a fucked inner ear since '96. (Better now, but not fixed.)

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I tried one of these a while back. Demo was a roller coaster ride, pretty basic graphics. Even so, I felt nauseated from motion sickness for about half an hour.

That's not something one can fix in hardware: your eyes are telling you one thing, and your inner ear something else. The only way to fix it is to not go for the "freak out" in the first place, which puts a large crimp in things. Initially, anyway, because most people can become less sensitive with training/exposure.

 

Even ordinary monitors can trigger the reaction, and they have multiple very large and obviously cues that the apparent motion is not real - the monitor bezel, the desk under it, the keyboard in front of it, etc.

 

Source: instrument pilot training, and living with a fucked inner ear since '96. (Better now, but not fixed.)

 

I rarely play games now, but if I play an FPS for half an or hour or so I start to feel queasy. If I take a break and come back to it, I'm usually ok after that.

 

I used the Oculus for less than a minute. The rollercoaster reached the first peak, where I looked around, then there was the big drop and a few curves, and I'd had enough. The sense of movement was very acute. I'm sure I'd get used to it with enough exposure.

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damn i wanna ride rollarcoasters in the lounge room !

 

Im sure the atomic overlords will get ahold of this gear and give us a nice deep review of the situation, this just sounds like too much fun to bring out at a party

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waiting for a few very indepth reviews might be worth it. But is this rift Gen1? they have made heaps of attempts at VR in the past. All shit, but this one seems to be "the one"

 

 

if i was you, i would wait for the Vive.

 

but re: avoiding motion sickness, this Oculus CV1 should be better than Crescent Bay which was waaay better than the DK2. lower latency, more accurate tracking, higher refresh rates on low-persistence OLEDs, various lens refinements and rendering tricks during fast head movements.

 

but, at this point its hard to see Facebook's offering trumping Valve's in terms of motion tracking. the option of 'room scale' movement is compelling. so too, is the boundless extensibility of the Lighthouse system.

 

as Cybes points out, no matter how refined the tech becomes in the near to longish term, conflicts in our vestibular systems stemming from mismatching sensory data will cause problems for many people during any form of locomotion -- even for a fairly high proportion of people having seated experiences inside a virtual vehicle.

 

for this reason some of the best experiences will be centred around static environments. and here is where the Vive will shine. motion sickness is negligible when moving around a 15ft square section of actual floor with fast-as-fuck sub-millimetre 1:1 mapping to the virtual space.

 

Edited by @~thehung

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[slight derail ]

 

Before I started playing. I would watch Walt on his PC play UT2004. I'd be viewing from the side of him so my view

of the screen was definitely off centre. I could only watch for a bit, as my focus would blurr and yeah I'd get woozy-ish.

But sitting dead centre and playing the same game was not a problem ...

 

[/ derail]

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eveln, i suspect that is mostly to do with a complete lack of 'agency' in the game world rather than the off-kilter viewing angle alone. when Walt is playing, there is an immediate correlation between his every intended change of view and the way he is moving the mouse. it is a very tight closed loop. when you are not directing the movement yourself, your brain has no warning about each new change of perspective. even the slightest lag (ie. single digit miliseconds) between your brain buying into the idea that "I am moving this way" and the view suddenly shifting in a new direction could cause enough of a mismatch to result in discomfort/sickness.

Edited by @~thehung

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Yep, as a non participant you're much more susceptable to motion sickness. I remember getting it just watching Formula One on PS1 on a TV, once played for a while it'd go away.

 

And car sickness... you practically never hear of it happening to the driver.

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Before I started playing. I would watch Walt on his PC play UT2004. I'd be viewing from the side of him so my view

of the screen was definitely off centre. I could only watch for a bit, as my focus would blurr and yeah I'd get woozy-ish.

But sitting dead centre and playing the same game was not a problem ...

 

eveln, i suspect that is mostly to do with a complete lack of 'agency' in the game world rather than the off-kilter viewing angle alone.

 

Yep, as a non participant you're much more susceptable to motion sickness. I remember getting it just watching Formula One on PS1 on a TV, once played for a while it'd go away.

 

And car sickness... you practically never hear of it happening to the driver.

 

Confirmation: After first getting my wheelchair (incidentally when I most needed it - and when I had not yet become used to senses clashing), I would become extremely nauseated if someone else took control fo it (ie: pushing me around and doing the steering for me). Yet, exactly the same thing or even more violent manoeuvres under my own power very rarely gave me a problem.

 

Again, though, with repeated exposure I've been desensitised to it, and that is rarely an issue any more. (I can still react badly if taken by surprise.)

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Okay ^^ good to know. Before then I'd not had a problem with motion sickness in any form.


I reckon for me to use oculus rift or it's like might depend on what I was viewing. I reckon the roller coaster komuso mentioned,

given it's speed, and variation of movement would've made me feel quite woozy too. But had it been something like "journey"

I would not have suffered quite so much ... maybe. idk.

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The price point is a bit more expensive than what was expected for sure.

I picked up a brand new DK2 for $300AU and gave it a bash for awhile. The potential was definitely there and Elite: Dangerous once configured properly was just out of this world. Truly next-level shit.

 

I ended up flogging it off for $450 and will 'watch this space' for a bit longer. No pre-orders for me, but will happily jump onboard as it matures.

Carmack was a big reason I decided to tune in to the project a little more, and the results of his signing on came quick and fast. He fixed up the long standing lag issue within his first few weeks with the code.

Legend.

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brains are fairly amazing. it will be interesting to see how people adapt to seated games in VR.

 

a very small minority of people dont get simulator sickness when "walking" through a VR environment by holding down a walk button which makes you glide through the world like youre on some fucked up ghost travellator. but a large proportion of those with ordinary sensitivity are okay for longish stretches when the means of movement has been decoupled from the body via the surrogate of some type of vehicle. i think its partly due to the fact that a machine is an abstraction and its far more natural to control an abstraction through a limited set of buttons and joysticks, and partly due to the fact that people have had time to adapt to vehicles in the real world.

 

 

but i think once latency is at near-zero many of those who still get sick in virtual vehicles will eventually adapt just like learning any other new skill.


Carmack ...

Legend.

 

indeed. watch pretty much any lengthy talk he has given at QuakeCon, Oculus Connect. whenever he talks about bleeding edge tech he produces the highest density of gold per second, and does it for hours without taking a breath. the man is a freak.

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I wont go Oculus Rift, been living my IT life on entry level laptops and Gaming consoles for some years now.

So the Rift would mean buying the Rift and the machine to drive it.

 

I do see me doing VR on the PS4, I already have the platform, just need to buy the peripheral and its breakout box, and Sony has got a bunch of stuff in the pipeline.

 

I don't see See The Rift and Morpheus as competitors, PS4 = closed gaming system, Oculus because on PC = potentially open with many more applications besides gaming. Say virtual tour, or others such things like site inspection of a hotel before booking etc.

 

I hope heaps of folks with meaty computers and no PS4 buy into and support the Rift, as I hope many folks like me with lame PC and owning a PS4 buy into and support Playstation VR .

 

Because VR will need plenty of early adopters, if we are going to convince developers that it is worth their time to code for it.

 

I don't think a slow start will kill it dead, though If too many wait for it to be absolutely perfect, it could stall the development of VR apps and the game media it needs.

 

 

w

Edited by Waltish

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brains are fairly amazing. it will be interesting to see how people adapt to seated games in VR.

 

a very small minority of people dont get simulator sickness when "walking" through a VR environment by holding down a walk button which makes you glide through the world like youre on some fucked up ghost travellator. but a large proportion of those with ordinary sensitivity are okay for longish stretches when the means of movement has been decoupled from the body via the surrogate of some type of vehicle. i think its partly due to the fact that a machine is an abstraction and its far more natural to control an abstraction through a limited set of buttons and joysticks, and partly due to the fact that people have had time to adapt to vehicles in the real world.

 

 

but i think once latency is at near-zero many of those who still get sick in virtual vehicles will eventually adapt just like learning any other new skill.

Carmack ...

 

Legend.

 

indeed. watch pretty much any lengthy talk he has given at QuakeCon, Oculus Connect. whenever he talks about bleeding edge tech he produces the highest density of gold per second, and does it for hours without taking a breath. the man is a freak.

Not just latency , some elimination of vertigo /motion sickness can come from blending scan lines from frame to frame which would cause less perceived chop and dither from the available frame-rate.

 

Funnily enough it was Carmack that first brought up the subject of interlacing as a one of a number of things that he though could help VR, and next thing you know shazzam !!, he has left IDthesda and is working for Oculus.

Edited by Waltish
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