Jump to content
Forum upgrade is live! Read more... ×

Recommended Posts

Hi everybody,

I have read somewhere (can't remember where) that you shouldn't re partition ur ssd into multiple partitions. Does anyone know if this is true? The reason I ask is I want to have a dual boot system with opensuse linux and windows and I don't want to use a virtual machine. I also don't want to mess around with my uefi. I want both o/ses to boot of the ssd.

cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The wear levelling might become biased if one partition is used somewhat less than the other (?) Then again, on an OS drive a large part of the system area will be fixed in stone and never changed.

 

A thing to consider though supposedly it won't occur on modern OSes (Vista/later ?) - a partition should always start on a 4K boundary and in fact cluster sizes should also be a multiple of 4K.

The problem that can arise is the drives read/write in 4K chunks and of a cluster spans multiple chunks and only uses part of the first or last then it will have a significant performance impact.

For older OSes, there's plenty of utilities around that can check and even correct a partition that's not properly allocated.

 

IMO if you've got a recent machine that has Sata3 or PCIe 2.0/better then it's worth considering running a pair of alike SSDs in RAID. The cost wouldn't be greatly more than a single drive of the larger size and the potential performance gain can be huge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

IMO if you've got a recent machine that has Sata3 or PCIe 2.0/better then it's worth considering running a pair of alike SSDs in RAID. The cost wouldn't be greatly more than a single drive of the larger size and the potential performance gain can be huge.

 

 

The wear levelling might become biased if one partition is used somewhat less than the other (?) Then again, on an OS drive a large part of the system area will be fixed in stone and never changed.

 

A thing to consider though supposedly it won't occur on modern OSes (Vista/later ?) - a partition should always start on a 4K boundary and in fact cluster sizes should also be a multiple of 4K.

The problem that can arise is the drives read/write in 4K chunks and of a cluster spans multiple chunks and only uses part of the first or last then it will have a significant performance impact.

For older OSes, there's plenty of utilities around that can check and even correct a partition that's not properly allocated.

 

IMO if you've got a recent machine that has Sata3 or PCIe 2.0/better then it's worth considering running a pair of alike SSDs in RAID. The cost wouldn't be greatly more than a single drive of the larger size and the potential performance gain can be huge.

 

sorry about that I could figure out how to quote. That's why i've posted who u said multiple times.

If i run a dual boot will both linux and windows be able to boot of the raid array?

Edited by slayme1974

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Opensuse's usual filesystems will handle issues with SSD's quite well.

 

The same goes for Windows.

 

As Rybags said this should not be an issue on modern OS's.

 

I'm running the same setup my worklaptop (SUSE 13.2 / Windows 8) and have not noticed any significant difference in the performance of the drive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an Asrock 970 Extreme 4 motherboard which comes with 5 SATA ports provided by the AMD SB950 raid controller. Can I run a RAID 0 array on ports 0&1 with ssds and still plug my hard drives into ports 2&3? (as non RAID volumes)

Edited by slayme1974

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Should be able to - usually a Raid controller will allow a mixed configuration such as that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×