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codecreeper

DVD vs Bluray

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In Australia, I hope I live long enough to see 4k streaming.

Netflix's 4K is specced to consume 7GB per hour, approx 15Mbps.

 

Doable on all but the worst ADSL2+.

 

 

You're in Brisbane dude; Do you know anyone thats above 10mbps? Of everyone I know, I think I know 2......

The rest cap out at about 7mbps.

I personally, reach 3.

 

Maybe you're northside? because southside is ALL bad copper.

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Everyone I know has either been the recipient of a tophat upgrade, switched to cable, or got NBN.

 

Plus, there won't be many people on ADSL in 5 years time.

 

>1 million premises are activated on NBN, they all have at least 25Mbps.

 

Chuck in all the people on HFC, non-NBN fibre (Velocity, Opticomm, etc), non-NBN FTT[b/K] (TPG, TransACT, etc), and you've got yourself a decent chunk of people with 4K-capable connections.

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Plus, there won't be many people on ADSL in 5 years time.

I'll quote you on that when the time comes, and I'm still on ADSL fucking ONE!

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Plus, there won't be many people on ADSL in 5 years time.

I'll quote you on that when the time comes, and I'm still on ADSL fucking ONE!

 

 

We have sites on Satelite because, while local phone lines are new, the exchange is old.

Also plenty of places have 0 ports, and a lot of people who want internet (Palm Island, for example, I know for sure)

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I admit 5 years is optimistic, but the point remains, the number of sub-15Mbps connections is going down over time.

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I admit 5 years is optimistic, but the point remains, the number of sub-15Mbps connections is going down over time.

 

very optimistic in my personal opinion.

We've had "Freeview" in place for AGES now, and how many stations still broadcast in Standard Definition? about 25\30.

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SD will be around for a long time yet.

Many TVs and STBs can't handle the MPEG4/H.264 codec that's starting to be used on some channels. In order to cram any decent number of services onto a frequency, MPEG2 just doesn't cut it. You get 2 SD and 1 HD service and anything beyond that means you have to drastically cut down the bitrate and get the resulting ugly blocking artifacts. Just turn to one of the spam/advertorial channels for an example.

 

But not all is lost - although the quality suffers, we have Win/9 here broadcasting 2 HD services and 4 or whatever SD ones, thanks to the fact that a couple of them are using MPEG4. Not entirely sure what the bitrate equivalence is for the same quality but I suspect it's somewhat better than 1/2.

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5407631286.png

 

I can stream 4K today. Except I don't, because I have a meagre 1080p TV. I'm not alone.

 

It sucks that you can only get 3Mbps at your house right now, but those days are numbered, one way or another.

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do note, this is a year old, but from ookla also;

"the average Australian download speed is 14.36 megabits per second (Mbps)"

 

Considering our masses in the city skewing results, I'd say my experience in the field is pretty realistic.... sub 10mbps is the most common I see.

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How do you mean "skewing the results"?

 

If the "masses" are making the average higher, doesn't that highlight the point?

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How do you mean "skewing the results"?

 

If the "masses" are making the average higher, doesn't that highlight the point?

 

Technically, yes.

but those same inner city people already had the likes of telstra 100mbps cable available for the last 10 years+, so really they're not a good indication of how fast internet is improving.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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Define "inner city"?

 

NBN alone already has a huge amount of coverage in the suburbs. I live in Murrumba Downs, I have FTTH. Until 12 months ago, there was only single-digit-Mbps service at my house, now I have the above.

 

NBN FTTN is available in Caboolture, and under construction in Dayboro. Definitely not inner-city. They had ADSL or nothing until very recently.

Edited by SquallStrife

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/wave

 

60km from the nearest State Capital, I had 20mbps.

60km from the CBD in a different direction and I have about 15mbps.

 

Rural surrounded by farms, both times.

 

I'm currently in the US surrounded by houses and apartment buildings, on cable, and it's pretty dire. Sometimes I'll see a very brief burst to ~50mbps but mostly I'm seeing sub-1mbps, even off-peak.

 

And yet Netflix seems to go ok.

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Not really. Median is the "middle" value when all values are sorted. Average isn't much better and same deal with midpoint.

 

It's comparing apples to pears - you can't bundle fibre, cable, dialup, DSL into the one statistical basket and expect to come up with realistic statistics from it. Really you need to at the least put them into classes based on expected ranges of throughput.

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there are instances when a median is more revealing.

 

suppose the absolute minimum for "acceptable" internet speed is defined as anything above 2 ips (internets per second)

then, for a population of ten with the following speeds: 9, 9, 8, 7, 2, 2, 1, 1, 1, 1

 

the average, 4.1, looks quite healthy being that its more than double what is merely acceptable,

whereas the median is a noticeably shitty 2 — a number which much more readily reflects the truth that most people have unacceptable speeds.

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There's also confusion about speed re the use of K. Bigger number looks better so the marketrons use 1,000 as K rather than 1,024.

Honest figures can just lead to more confusion as it can be unclear if it's the bigger K, smaller K or Special K.

 

A proposal to remedy this would be a new unit known as "Eleventy". One Eleventy is 1,100. The advantage of this system is that the unit size is now consistent but can be readily compared to the old system using K. The maths involved are similar to calculating GST so should be familiar to most non-technical people.

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