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ROUBOS

When will I ever make the switch? (Never?)

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Hi,

I've always wanted to try Linux. Been trying since 1996 with early versions of Red Hat. At the time the fun was always trying to install it properly. Never lasted though as a gamer I always switched back to windows.
Even later when I thought to myself "no gaming", I found it hard to use without native support for Adobe products. Tried dual booting, but the fun had always been setting it up, and modifying the desktop experience with nice effects.

The challenge was nice since I've always only had ATI card since 3Dfx Voodoo :)

 

I found that Ati/AMD GPU never failed me but I had once or twice a bad experience with Nvidia cards. I know that it's not the nvidia chips, but rather the manufacturers. I've always had Saphire and ASUS ati/amd cards and always very happy with them.

 

Now it's been a long time and I've always been trying to install and run linux properly, but my choice of graphics card has always failed me. And on top of it Adobe products, and my love for games. Tried many distros from Ubuntu to Debian to Fedora and LinuxMint.

 

Last night I thought I try again and downloaded the latest Ubuntu version. I thought I'll check out the live dvd. No chance. I boot it, and end up with a blank screen. So my GPU failed me once again.

 

To be honest I've been using PCs for a very long time since my Amiga500 days and my first 386. Just saying that I've been through so much fixing failing systems, and I've come to the point were I just want things to work out of the box. Don't have the patience to fix things up.

 

I play games so I have my steam, I pay for Adobe cloud and I just want a system that can run these for me. It seems that I'll never be able to use a Linux system and that I'm stuck in the Windows world. Which to be honest has its flaws but works.

I know it's not the OS but the manufacturer support.

 

So will I ever switch to Linux? Not sure. Do I want to? Yes.. at least try it for a while but it seems that I need to go through the process of getting a new graphics card. And not only that, say I do get a new graphics card, then I'll have to go through the process of playing around with WINE etc just to get a few things working.

 

Anyway, I thought I share my thoughts since I tried once again with no luck.

 

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I don't see the point either. Plenty of Linux users are just anti Wintel brigade, for whatever it's worth to get whatever their point is across, they end up suffering.

 

It's all well and good if you're after a cheap platform to serve up webpages, mail server, file server, database, whatever. But in such cases most of the OS is excess baggage anyway.

For the home user, you want something that's a jack of all trades and Windows fits the bill. Virtually any hardware works without too much pain. The popular applications and such may well have open-source equivalents but face it, open source has become a bit of a joke in that innovation gets stifled by the fact of too many people wanting their say and the net result being stagnation.

 

Then there's games. OK, so you can get DirectX layers, WINe environments, whatever. But what's the friggen point? You may as well have just installed Windows in the first place!

 

I think in the modern era though, with the decent virtualisation at hardware and software level you can run Linux under a Windows host anyway and barely notice the difference.

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if valve ever got there steam box of the ground with hl3\portal3 with linux it may get better support but microsoft will do whatever it takes to stop this happening even if it has to release consoles every 4 years

 

this could make a nice steam box

gtx 1070 on a b150 mb

http://www.overclock3d.net/articles/gpu_displays/colorful_show_off_an_intel_skylake_motherboard_with_a_built_in_gtx_1070_gpu/1

04081230758l.jpg

 

edit ok so it is kinda of the ground there is a few steam boxes and steam os based on linux

Edited by Dasa

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Do we need another console, or proprietary computer standard?

 

I think probably not. OK, maybe a PC alternative using the latest bus interfaces and a fast multi-core RISC CPU.

But then, Apple had most of that and ditched it in favour of x86.

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Yes you guys are right. What's the point? I do everything I want easy with Windows. Always have since win 3.1 & Dos.

I did complain every second windows version but always used windows. (Loved 3.1, 98, XP, 7 and now 10, - hated 95, ME, Vista, and 8.1)

 

I always wanted to use Linux, was always arguing with friend in favor of linux even though I always used windows apart from UNIX at UNI.

 

Now that I'm too old (40 yrs old) to have the luxury of time to waste on trying to play around with an OS, format this, format that trying to make it work, I notice that windows serves me better and I've on this environment for so long I feel comfortable with it and sorting out if things go wrong.

 

I think that forking is something that never really worked in favor of Linux, and all open source software, and that's why I thought maybe Ubuntu is getting somewhere with Canonical working on it. Then again RedHat did the same for a while and then they just moved away from home system and just focused on server environments etc.

 

My guess is that Linux is part of my world in form of my Android phone and that's about it. Even there windows is kind enough to work with my Android phone, something that MacOS does not seem to like. but that's another story.

 

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I'm sure this discussion has been seen in the forum thousands of times, so I'm off to fire up BattleNet and play a game of starcraft 2 on my win10 machine :) before I do some work with Adobe products, notpad++, wampserver and python all on the same machine.

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You could run Linux in a virtual machine and see if it suits you, this way you don't lose your Windows install.

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I've never found a computer that Ubuntu wont boot on.

I have an HD7970 and it boots perfectly.

Sometimes I have to use the 'Alternate' build, but what do I expect from an OS where all the drivers are attempted to be 'built in'?

Its more often a good thing, than a hindrance.

 

I've made the switch on my laptops. I'm windows 8.1 on the desktop.

 

Why? Well, a few reasons:

1. I can go to sites that would normally contain malware, without risk or worry.

2. I can do a lot of advanced networking stuff when on a public connection (like in a hotel).

3. It greatly increases my battery time. No matter how slim windows gets, or how 'battery aware' it can't seem to match the CPU idle time of a Linux distribution.

4. It boots quicker. Even quicker than 'Fast Boot'

5. My favorite software 'Just Works'. No more 'Install GTK+' or 'Cygwin' or LibPurple, no more 'Wrong version' errors (the software compiles for my machine SPECIFICALLY). I like things that 'Just Work', and Ubuntu does.

6. I like the community. They're friendly and helpful. Compare the Windows Technet people to the Ubuntu forums, and its like the choice between punching your own face, and sipping a coke.

 

 

I've also taken to installing Ubuntu (with the new-ish UNITY interface) on all my older relatives computers.

9/10 times all drivers are already working by default, so I can leave a 'Live CD' there in case something goes wrong (they can still boot the PC).

In addition, 99% of what my relatives do, are Internet based, Email based, or Photo based.

 

And Firefox, Thunderbird and Gimp are all there by default. Its literally a 'set and forget' appliance operating system.

Not to mention Libre Office comes pre-installed also. Its just 'ready out of the box'.

 

And its all there, on a permanent menu, with an easy to understand interface. All software they know and have seen before, even if they've only used windows (god bless firefox).

 

The added bonus for the 'Tech Scared' is that its "Virus proof!" they love the sound of that, and leaving a CD that means it can 'just work' no matter what mistakes? Priceless.

 

 

When i looked at my PERSONAL software list (VLC player, TheGIMP, LibreOffice, Pidgin Messenger, Firefox\Waterfox, Steam - DOTA2) there was really no compelling reason to be on Windows.

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Been using OpenSuse for years now as my primary machine for web browsing / work.

 

I keep Windows on a separate partition for gaming (which i seem to be doing less and less now).

 

For what i do there is no need for Windows for me and the majority of my work servers are Linux so it makes it easier to manage them (Putty sucks compared to a Linux console).

 

The only Adobe products i use is Coldfusion and soon that's going to get tossed out.

 

So for me the opposite is true, I see no reason to use windows.

Edited by Xen
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I tried a live CD on my Dell laptop. Intel i7 with a quadro gpu. Loaded fine and looked great. Even the touch screen works. I will dual boot ubuntu on this laptop as it's a work machine.

My desktop being all AMD for some reason the live CD booted to a black screen and the monitor goes to sleep. So I guess my GPU is not compatible.

 

With my work machine though the only drawback would be adobe products. We use them a lot and I would of thought that now with adobe cloud it would work on Ubuntu natively. If that could work then I wouldn't need the dual boot.

 

Security wise, I know linux is safer etc. But I do pay for bitdefender on all my machines and they do not have a version for linux (discontinued). Don't we also need an antivirus protection on linux? I know most virus and attacks are for the most used OS out there which is Windows, but the more linux is used and grows wouldn't that make it more of a target?

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Linux is not bullet proof to attacks.

Look at android, they have linux cores and get targetted a lot.

Edited by Jeruselem

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I had Ubuntu installed on a previous machine... I loved that it turned my old shitbox back into a useful machine, so I put it on my *new* machine. That did not go so well - driver problems galore, and looking up fixes for things turned into a nightmare cycle of google/edit/recompile/"fuck, what broke this time?"

 

Given that most of what I do on these things is at least half gaming, messing about with Linux just is not worth the stress for me.

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I had Ubuntu installed on a previous machine... I loved that it turned my old shitbox back into a useful machine, so I put it on my *new* machine. That did not go so well - driver problems galore, and looking up fixes for things turned into a nightmare cycle of google/edit/recompile/"fuck, what broke this time?"

 

Given that most of what I do on these things is at least half gaming, messing about with Linux just is not worth the stress for me.

 

Drivers are alway an issue, at least with commercial OSes they release drivers or well ... semi-compatible drivers, for pure Linux, good luck with new hardware.

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Probably never.

 

I've made several attempts to "Go Linux" over the years, most recently earlier this year.

 

It starts out well, usually. I have to spend an hour or so pissing about to get everything "just right" with multiple monitors of different resolutions etc.

 

But after the first week or two it goes downhill. Most often it's stupid stuff like WINS name resolution randomly stops, so I can't access SMB resources by name any more.

 

Sometimes it's more disruptive, like the game I feel like playing has no Linux version and needs hours of pissing around with Wine configs to get working, etc etc etc.

 

It's just not worth it. Windows costs ~$100 and gives me none of this grief.

 

I know that for some people that's the appeal, the challenge of fixing issues or whatever. But for me, when something isn't working, it's just a roadblock to me using the computer as a tool to achieve some goal.

 

For a UNIX-like OS (that actually has UNIX certification), I'll use OSX. For everything else, there's Windows.

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Linux is not bullet proof to attacks.

Look at android, they have linux cores and get targetted a lot.

 

Do they?

I thought it was based on Unix\Qnix?

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Linux is not bullet proof to attacks.

Look at android, they have linux cores and get targetted a lot.

Do they?

I thought it was based on Unix\Qnix?

 

Android uses the Linux kernel. Always has.

 

AploHNm.png

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Linux is not bullet proof to attacks.

Look at android, they have linux cores and get targetted a lot.

Do they?

I thought it was based on Unix\Qnix?

 

Android uses the Linux kernel. Always has.

 

AploHNm.png

 

HUH! whatd'ya know?!

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It's not really significant though, in all the ways that matter, Android isn't a "Linux Distribution".

 

- It doesn't use GNU userland or glibc

- It doesn't use X

- It only loosely follows the FHS (/bin, /dev, /usr, /etc, /opt, /mnt, and so on)

 

It's most accurate to say it's "Dalvik/Linux" as opposed to "GNU/Linux", but IMO saying that Android devices count as "people using Linux" is disingenuous.

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there's an ubuntu phone out there but ... no one likes the interface for it

 

I actually didnt mind the interface. It was VERY smooth.

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Haven't seen a Linux desktop since KDE 3.2.

 

Haven't used a Linux desktop since then either.

 

But Linux servers? All the time. Headless Ubuntu and CentOS are the staples of my IT diet.

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Haven't seen a Linux desktop since KDE 3.2.

 

Haven't used a Linux desktop since then either.

 

But Linux servers? All the time. Headless Ubuntu and CentOS are the staples of my IT diet.

 

You'd be impressed I think.

Ubuntu's new 'UNITY' shell feels like OSX to the end user.

 

Programs they are (quite probably) familiar with are pre-loaded, driver compatibility is almost perfect these days, and they have a 'launcher' bar down the side, which behaves almost identically to the apple dock bar.

 

For Elderly people, or even kids who do "Online Only" activities, its priceless! Truly plug and play.

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I had Ubuntu installed on a previous machine... I loved that it turned my old shitbox back into a useful machine, so I put it on my *new* machine. That did not go so well - driver problems galore, and looking up fixes for things turned into a nightmare cycle of google/edit/recompile/"fuck, what broke this time?"

 

Given that most of what I do on these things is at least half gaming, messing about with Linux just is not worth the stress for me.

 

Drivers are alway an issue, at least with commercial OSes they release drivers or well ... semi-compatible drivers, for pure Linux, good luck with new hardware.

 

 

Only issue I've had was with ATI which took a bit of fiddling.

 

Reinstalled OpenSUSE LEAP 42.1 on my desktop last weekend.

 

Asus Maximus viii hero and a 980ti... not one issue.

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I think nVidia are pretty good with Linux drivers, well they make Android devices too.

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Personally i have a massive investment in Windows and i will most likely never move over to Linux as my daily driver on my primary machine. My laptop runs Ubuntu and it's what I take with me when i travel. But my primary desktop is Windows based and I Don't think that will ever change.

 

With that being said all of my "server" stuff at home is running on Linux (Ubuntu server). I get free Windows server licenses through work, but to be honest it's just so much easier to fire up a new Linux server if your application supports it. No license stuff, takes up very few resources and storage space. For me it's a massive win.

 

Example of my "server" stuff

* Media Center

* Owncloud

* Confluence

* Gitlab

* PFSense

 

To summarize, I love working with Linux, but like everything else in IT it's a tool and you have to use the best tool for that job!

Edited by smakme7757

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