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scruffy1

and now for some good news...

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Yeah, I put a quick one in WOMM... then realised - nice timing, they got it in there just in the nick of time for July 4 (guess 2-4 hours before midnight US eastern time when the orbit was established).

 

It's easy to forget about this stuff... New Horizons will apparently take 16 months to transmit the entire data payload of the Pluto flyby ( @2 kb/sec). Even the Voyager probes are still sending back data.

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Yeah, I put a quick one in WOMM... then realised - nice timing, they got it in there just in the nick of time for July 4 (guess 2-4 hours before midnight US eastern time when the orbit was established).

 

It's easy to forget about this stuff... New Horizons will apparently take 16 months to transmit the entire data payload of the Pluto flyby ( @2 kb/sec). Even the Voyager probes are still sending back data.

 

Still more reliable than Telstra LOL

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:)

 

It's about fundamental science.

 

NASA hadn't really made a massive deal about this one but I was just hearing that it is a most unusual deep space probe in being almost entirely solar powered - usually they are nuclear. As a result there is going to be a bit of a delay in getting imagery back, things need re-charging but given the journey time not much of an issue really.

 

Cheers

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I really wonder why put these spacecraft in Orbit around planets mankind cannot even explore yet.

 

What they going to learn ,new refrigeration techniques? That planet is so cold it will freeze anything that enters its outer stratosphere.

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Yes and no code, this explains it a little, but in the end it is science, which can have very surprising outcomes:

 

http://www.news.com.au/technology/science/space/if-all-goes-according-to-plan-today-heres-what-we-can-hope-to-learn-from-the-juno-probe/news-story/813c19964976c0c462aa23ef386ff973

 

Jupiter is a gas giant, a sort of a failed star, Arthur C Clarke postulated in the 2001 series igniting it to give us a second sun, probably unlikely but the gas giants are interesting and there is nothing wrong with being inquisitive for the sake of acquiring knowledge.

 

Cheers

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The colony prospects are on some of the moons. But it's mostly about gaining knowledge. Mars and our moon is where it's at really for any colony prospects, along with space stations (think something about the size of an aircraft carrier generating it's own gravity).

 

The big risk with solar is you can get fucked over royally if the orientation slips out just a minute bit.

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Hmm.

 

There are possibilities in the Jovian and Saturnian moons, and our own of course but I think the LaGrange points make more sense - snag a rock or three and create your own moons ;)

 

Yes, it was a gamble on NASA's part to rely so much on solar for this one but it seems to be paying off. Apparently the move came about because there has been concern for a time about just one of these long duration probes having a failure on launch and the nuclear "batteries" for want of another word impacting somewhere on earth.

 

I guess, but we don't get a lot of launch failures these days.

 

Cheers

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:)

 

It's about fundamental science.

 

NASA hadn't really made a massive deal about this one but I was just hearing that it is a most unusual deep space probe in being almost entirely solar powered - usually they are nuclear. As a result there is going to be a bit of a delay in getting imagery back, things need re-charging but given the journey time not much of an issue really.

 

Cheers

Solar spaceships?

 

Fucking Space Warming. Probably our fault too...

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That is pretty cool! Next we will have to create spaceships with sustainable life support to explore the unknown :D

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#Juno team just put a basketball court sized spacecraft into orbit around a radioactive gas giant 400 million miles away. Let that sink in.

 

 

Love that quote. Quite an amazing feat.

Edited by rs727

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That is pretty cool! Next we will have to create spaceships with sustainable life support to explore the unknown :D

Or we could make better bombs and guns, hmm, who will win?

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