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chrisg

This Census

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It's not the language per se Twinny, it's the sales people using it

 

oh for sure! the evil comes from the feedback loop when the general public latches onto a word and all of a sudden it has wide currency from a marketing point of view.

 

what really amazes me, though, is the amount of times i have to go to a wikipedia page rather than some tech company's actual site to find out exactly, point by concise point, what it is they do — because so often these days their pages are DROWNING in marketing bullshit! the thing is, these pages are usually plastered with the sort of highly technical jargon that would instantly alienate casual non-tech people with no reason at all to land there, and yet they somehow manage to convey nothing useful to anyone with a genuine interest, leaving me wondering what non-existent person the page is trying to impress.

 

 

Oh god they got you too!

 

Of which topic do you speak of, Willis?

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Well a cloud centric ecosystem is still a valid description. Again, using Apple as an example...interdependencies and integration between their hardware products and storing data in iCloud.

Seems perfectly logical and normal to me.

Photos and other personal data, along with device settings and keychains, all store in the cloud so if I ever lose my MacBook, iPhone or iPad, it's simply a matter of connecting the replacement device to my iTunes account and hey presto, all my shit is back and restored.

 

alternatively, it can be used to refer to healthy competition between lots of specialised companies but in such a way that its easy to pick and choose from these to function as the interconnecting parts of any particular solution.

 

Yeah, well, nah.

 

That's precisely what they don't want.

What they do want, is what's known as "vendor lock in"

 

 

who, Apple? yeah, Apple = suffocating walled garden. but i think you missed my point.

 

look at all the google results on that phrase that relate to IoT. that space is in a protracted state of disruption. large and small players are fighting and killing each other every day. symbiotic relationships are being created and destroyed. but when all is said and done there is great fluidity and flexibility in the cloud brought about through standards of interoperability. which means theres a million ways to skin a cat. sure, some companies will integrate vertically and/or horizontally into behemoths, and some will opt to occupy a niche in the market so as to be utilised by a range of entities who may be in competition with each other. there can be "vendor lock-in" throughout this. the point i am making is about diversity ie. insofar as it can be one of the ways the tag of 'ecosystem' makes sense.

Edited by @~thehung
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:)

 

Ever tried reduction of grammatical sensibility around marketing people ? You end up with a null most of the time :)

 

One of my longest of all friends, I went to high school with him, is a marketer, an honest one who uses plain language, crazy thing is some of his clients WANT the flowery rubbish...

 

Cheers

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Yes well, pink gold is now "rose gold" these days even though real rose gold isn't that pink as an example.

Edited by Jeruselem

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:)

 

"They bought a Jeep"

 

Well, they should be home doing the gardening then, fucking things never leave the workshop :) (Believe me, two friends are suing Jeep right now... )

 

Cheers

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Well a cloud centric ecosystem is still a valid description. Again, using Apple as an example...interdependencies and integration between their hardware products and storing data in iCloud.

Seems perfectly logical and normal to me.

Photos and other personal data, along with device settings and keychains, all store in the cloud so if I ever lose my MacBook, iPhone or iPad, it's simply a matter of connecting the replacement device to my iTunes account and hey presto, all my shit is back and restored.

 

alternatively, it can be used to refer to healthy competition between lots of specialised companies but in such a way that its easy to pick and choose from these to function as the interconnecting parts of any particular solution.

 

Yeah, well, nah.

 

That's precisely what they don't want.

What they do want, is what's known as "vendor lock in"

 

 

who, Apple? yeah, Apple = suffocating walled garden. but i think you missed my point.

 

look at all the google results on that phrase that relate to IoT. that space is in a protracted state of disruption. large and small players are fighting and killing each other every day. symbiotic relationships are being created and destroyed. but when all is said and done there is great fluidity and flexibility in the cloud brought about through standards of interoperability. which means theres a million ways to skin a cat. sure, some companies will integrate vertically and/or horizontally into behemoths, and some will opt to occupy a niche in the market so as to be utilised by a range of entities who may be in competition with each other. there can be "vendor lock-in" throughout this. the point i am making is about diversity ie. insofar as it can be one of the ways the tag of 'ecosystem' makes sense.

 

Gotcha.

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Everything has come full circle now, hasn't it?

From WYSE terminals, to desktop computing, and now back to client/server computing in the form of Citrix and virtualisation etc.

Annoys hell out of me as a simple home user. I *like* having my files on my own disks; I can make multiple backups of things that matter, and none of the fluff - or hack the content of my single-player game. And when I can't get to things, i know why.

 

I also get kinda annoyed by having to setup accounts and logins for a machine that is never going to have more than one user, and if it gets stolen the loss of the machine will be more concern than the data.

 

I too remember the move to PCs, away from dumb terminals.

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yes, and most people seem only too happy to get royal shafted by every damn thing moving over to a subscription model.

 

SaaS has many cool benefits, but its only a matter of time until we start renting access to our operating systems by the hour ...

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SaaS has many cool benefits, but its only a matter of time until we start renting access to our operating systems by the hour ...

 

When you consider that the average home computer sits unused most of its time, per-hour pricing would actually work out advantageously for a lot of people.

 

For instance, why would you pay for a whole month or year of Office 365, when you use Excel once a year to do your budget, and Publisher once or twice to make a party invite?

 

And yeah yeah I know Open/Libre/PrincessOffice for Leenix, but you know what I'm getting at.

Edited by SquallStrife

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:)

 

365 is one of Ms' better rip -offs :)

 

I'm still predicting a massive move to Mint - you seen how good the new version is ?

 

Cheers

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O365 is *brilliant* for small business. The yearly subscription is easier to write off on tax as it doesn't depreciate.

With a small business setup, you can also very easily get an 'exchange server in the cloud' which is fantastic for calendaring and the like (And despite what people say. Exchange is one of the best software packages for calendars in a business. The rooms + equipment + people calendaring function is brilliant. )

 

O365 subscription also allows you to install (IIRC) 5 copies of office onto different PCs simultaneously per subscription. So work and home. And provided the workplace allows it, you can install it at home, get the full access. But if you leave, the license gets canned and that's it. So a good perk for the office worker.

 

O365 subscription has it's place. I just don't think it belongs in the home. But it is great for the office and small business.

 

AD

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SaaS has many cool benefits, but its only a matter of time until we start renting access to our operating systems by the hour ...

When you consider that the average home computer sits unused most of its time, per-hour pricing would actually work out advantageously for a lot of people.

 

For instance, why would you pay for a whole month or year of Office 365, when you use Excel once a year to do your budget, and Publisher once or twice to make a party invite?

 

And yeah yeah I know Open/Libre/PrincessOffice for Leenix, but you know what I'm getting at.

That works great for server side computing (think AWS/Azure) which do charge by the hour, but sucks for end-user.

 

End user computing is still frequently offline so entering becomes really hard.

 

Additionally the support model sucks. A user who uses Excel once a year might be the user who finds a showstopper bug which will require24hours of support time which costs MS $30/H.

 

Hence it's much easier to build an OPEX model with regular monthly income, guaranteed for a year which allows the coats to beoffset against a common return.

 

Off course, more importantly, your profit is also more predictable this way.

 

In my own business, I've followed Microsoft's model too. I no longer sell products - I sell services.

 

I roll project and server costs into a monthly rental cost, add CPI YonY increases, add a capacity factor of 10% and then slap on a GP percentage which is my profit.

 

At the end of the contract, you re-sign and get an upgrade of all your gear. Without paying an additional cent in CAPEX.

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I'm actually considering getting a Chrome book.

But as has been mentioned above, I do like to have my shit with me, locally. I work offline a fair bit. But I do like the Chromebook concept. Plus they're cheap, might get one to mess around with.

I think a new OS is in the works, too.

 

 

BTW - Census complete! Did it last night. I can't remember the questions they asked in the 2011 Census, but this one seemed to be very stripped down and basic. Didn't take long at all.

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I'm actually considering getting a Chrome book.

But as has been mentioned above, I do like to have my shit with me, locally. I work offline a fair bit. But I do like the Chromebook concept. Plus they're cheap, might get one to mess around with.

I think a new OS is in the works, too.

 

 

BTW - Census complete! Did it last night. I can't remember the questions they asked in the 2011 Census, but this one seemed to be very stripped down and basic. Didn't take long at all.

 

Chromebook is useless here, my 4G signal is highly variable but it would be fine using the home wifi (NBN)

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I'm actually considering getting a Chrome book.

But as has been mentioned above, I do like to have my shit with me, locally. I work offline a fair bit. But I do like the Chromebook concept. Plus they're cheap, might get one to mess around with.

I think a new OS is in the works, too.

 

 

BTW - Census complete! Did it last night. I can't remember the questions they asked in the 2011 Census, but this one seemed to be very stripped down and basic. Didn't take long at all.

 

Chromebook is useless here, my 4G signal is highly variable but it would be fine using the home wifi (NBN)

 

Yah, they're not for everyone.

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:)

 

The comedy just continues:

 

http://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/radio/more-sidesteps-than-johnathan-thurston-census-minister-explains-zero-in-great-duckandweave-interview/news-story/abc06867577497f7594de1f91ed2d8f7

 

What a bunch of fuckwits, and by the way the site fell over again yesterday :)

 

It's been a long, long time since I studied stats but the veracity of this snapshot data has to be corroding rather rapidly...

 

Cheers

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I think all info from this years census should be trashed. Just forget this year. Do it again in another five years using the paper route.

One day to do it as per the past.

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Nah, it'll be much easier next time. Our population has shrunk to 16.5 million since 2011.

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Nah, it'll be much easier next time. Our population has shrunk to 16.5 million since 2011.

Ahh haha I think you jest ;) lol.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demographics_of_Australia

" The demographics of Australia covers basic statistics, most populous cities, ethnicity and religion.

The population of Australia is estimated to be 24,162,900 as of 19 August 2016."

 

 

Seems weird that info gathered via the census this year will be considered with any real seriousness ;)

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:)

 

It's not the language per se Twinny, it's the sales people using it - challenge them and unlike yourself they go into flounder mode trying to explain what they do not understand. ;)

 

The terminal world was a damned sight easier to manage that's for sure, don't exactly get virus and malware issues on dumb screens :)

 

Cheers

 

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