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RenascentMisanthropy

Are you a compulsive upgrader?

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Check your local Gumtree and similar... locally there's been near a dozen ads recently of people getting rid of their nVidia 10xx cards.

 

There's the ones who got the 1080s and basked in their fortnight of glory and find themselves broke or just found they don't need it, then there's the ones who got the 1060 or 1070 and have since "upgraded".

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Last time I did a build ~2 years ago, I spent way over the top because I wanted to have a top of the line computer for once. I doubt I'll bother doing it again, been there done that etc. Barring component failure, it'll probably do me fine through till 2020. The graphics card crapped out just before the 1060 release, so I grabbed one of them, but I have to admit, I did some serious consideration of just staying on the GTX280 I pulled out of the cupboard. Other than having to lower the res of HOI4 a bit, running on the 280 didn't harm my game playing in the slightest. Hardware isn't moving nearly as fast these days as it was in the early 2000's, upgrading regularly often buys you surprisingly little.

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the best aspect of upgrading is better (or equal) capabilities for far less power

 

so less heat, and smaller electricity bills

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the best aspect of upgrading is better (or equal) capabilities for far less power

 

so less heat, and smaller electricity bills

 

'Cept it never work out that way, does it? We end up driving the stuff harder, for the same heat and power, but greater performance.

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the best aspect of upgrading is better (or equal) capabilities for far less power

 

so less heat, and smaller electricity bills

 

'Cept it never work out that way, does it? We end up driving the stuff harder, for the same heat and power, but greater performance.

 

 

not so

 

the i5 2500k peaks at 77w for all four cores grunting on transcodes at 4.2ghz (even though its nominal rating is 95w - maybe that's 'cos i under-volt it); the dual core e8400 used to take 95w to do 3.6ghz transcoding on its two cores at under stock volts also

 

my hd7950 was close to 200w; the current gtx760 oc peaks at 150w with a fairly hefty clock speed base of 1155mhz, yet it toasts the hd for capability

 

and ssd uses minimal power compared to hdd - so i use it for my system and exes, but the old hdd for storage; my nas draws ~15w when serving, ~ 5 on idle

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The Core i seems to have much better power management than the Core 2 - even though my Xeon has TDP of 130W, under idle or light load the entire system uses about 55-85 Watts.

The older high-end graphics cards, I've got 2 ATIs and they're both pretty power hungry. But it would seem nVidia are doing a better job than AMD of keeping the power/heat down with current gen stuff.

 

So tempted today - picked up 2x4 Gig DDR3-1866 which will go to good use but also up for grabs is a decent LGA 1150 board and 3.4 GHz Xeon for $300. Problem is I've got 3 i7/equivalent systems including the Macbook Pro as it is.

Seems my problem isn't so much upgrading as accumulating.

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Definitely only when needed. I don't use my computer for gaming so it's not very common I'd need to upgrade, and it's rather powerful already so I can't see the need to upgrade any time soon either.

The only think I could imagine upgrading soon would be the Hard Drive.

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'Cept it never work out that way, does it? We end up driving the stuff harder, for the same heat and power, but greater performance.

not so

 

the i5 2500k peaks at 77w for all four cores grunting on transcodes at 4.2ghz (even though its nominal rating is 95w - maybe that's 'cos i under-volt it); the dual core e8400 used to take 95w to do 3.6ghz transcoding on its two cores at under stock volts...

 

I said "we" - as in us enthusiasts, who can't leave enything alone. ;p But yeah, point taken.

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Bought Civ6 on the weekend. Something's busted (software) on my PC and it won't start - probably related to windows updates being borked for about a year now.

 

so.. the upgrade choice... re-install win7 and hope I can keep it going for a couple more years. or say what the hell, and buy anew CPU, Mobo & RAM and an windows 10 licence, knowing that then it won't need an upgrade for another 5 years.

The choice of $s vs the PITA of rebuilding twice.

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Have you tried the technique of deleting the update cache dir after disabling the BITS service?

 

There's been some pretty horrendous items in updates e.g. that have stopped old software from being able to even install, then they fix it quietly on subsequent updates. So it would seem that unless you just have a floor SP1 Win7 install it's important to have updates working, just for the fact you get fixes for the "fixes".

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I have tried that... update still just sat there for 2 hours with no progress.

 

Now there is a i7-6700 CPU, Z170 motherboard, 32GB of DDR4 and a 500G m.2 NVMe and a copy of win10 ready for transplanting when I get some time.

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Now that I've had a think about it, I've upgraded my NAS more often than my PC in the past 10 years.

 

The main reason for this is that the earlier NAS's have limited support for large capacity drives, so I've needed to upgrade. For my PC, the last 2 CPUs I've had have never been a problem (currently running an i7-4770K). I've just replaced the GPU and SSDs every 3 years or so...

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Now that I've had a think about it, I've upgraded my NAS more often than my PC in the past 10 years.

 

The main reason for this is that the earlier NAS's have limited support for large capacity drives, so I've needed to upgrade.

Use a regular PC and pop FreeNAS onto it.

ZFS can upgrade your storage pool in place and grow the volumes as you replace drives with bigger capacity ones

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Now that I've had a think about it, I've upgraded my NAS more often than my PC in the past 10 years.

 

The main reason for this is that the earlier NAS's have limited support for large capacity drives, so I've needed to upgrade.

Use a regular PC and pop FreeNAS onto it.

ZFS can upgrade your storage pool in place and grow the volumes as you replace drives with bigger capacity ones

 

Only if the firmware supports it :)

 

My last NAS was indeed a FreeNAS box running NFS.

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i got sick of the fan cycling in my qnap nas (ts212p) - so i pulled it apart and replaced the heatsink with a copper one that was twice as heavy and a few millimetres bigger in length and breadth, and 3mm taller

 

fitted with millimetres to spare, and has been much quieter (and cooler) since

 

why do they skimp on a sodding passive cooler ?

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