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SonOfNoddy

Switching to the Master Race

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So I want to switch my PC over to Arch (as my main OS at least), and I was just wondering how I would go about doing so with the least amount of head smashing and keep most of the features of windows, so can anybody help me out?

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> Arch

> least amount of head smashing

> keep most of the features of windows

 

 

 

> Arch

HAAAAhahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

 

Good luck!

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> Arch

> least amount of head smashing

> keep most of the features of windows

 

 

 

> Arch

HAAAAhahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

 

Good luck!

 

so is it possible or am I just gonna get laughed at? i'm fine either way :P

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> Arch

> least amount of head smashing

> keep most of the features of windows

 

 

 

> Arch

HAAAAhahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

 

Good luck!

 

so is it possible or am I just gonna get laughed at? i'm fine either way :P

 

 

Head smashing will occur.

 

First question i would have is why... why Linux, why Arch?

 

I've been running various Linux systems for a number of years now and use SUSE as my main workstation.

 

I use SUSE because its easy to use, if you're looking for a Linux learning experience then yes Arch or Gentoo will do it.

 

Second question is what windows features are you looking to keep?

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First question i would have is why... why Linux, why Arch?

 

 

Linux because I want to be a member of the Master Race, but in all seriousness there's a couple of reasons;

1. It's nerdgasmic if you make it look good

2. I'm not amazing at Linux (or Unix) and based of some stuff a friend has said (who only uses OS X macOS for Adobe) that Arch is easier to learn off than Gentoo

3. Windows is getting boring

 

Second question is what windows features are you looking to keep?

 

Mainly my "windows only" games, that's really the only reason I haven't done so earlier....

 

 

and i'm surprised Cybes hasn't come in here and said something about "switching to a better OS" or "about time you left win7 in the past" XP

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2. I'm not amazing at Linux (or Unix) and based of some stuff a friend has said (who only uses OS X macOS for Adobe) that Arch is easier to learn off than Gentoo

Arch and Gentoo are the most autistic distros. They're complicated for the sake of being complicated, they pander to the obsessive nature of the people that use them.

 

If you want to use your computer to actually do things, Ubuntu, Mint or Suse are better choices.

 

3. Windows is getting boring

Who cares if it's boring though, it's just there to enable you to run programs.

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First question i would have is why... why Linux, why Arch?

 

 

Linux because I want to be a member of the Master Race, but in all seriousness there's a couple of reasons;

1. It's nerdgasmic if you make it look good

2. I'm not amazing at Linux (or Unix) and based of some stuff a friend has said (who only uses OS X macOS for Adobe) that Arch is easier to learn off than Gentoo

3. Windows is getting boring

 

Second question is what windows features are you looking to keep?

 

Mainly my "windows only" games, that's really the only reason I haven't done so earlier....

 

 

and i'm surprised Cybes hasn't come in here and said something about "switching to a better OS" or "about time you left win7 in the past" XP

 

 

Ok fair enough on the reasons.

 

I still run windows, the only reason why i do is because of games.

 

Unless it has changed a lot running windows software on Linux has always been a pain in the ass, games doubly so.

 

Do not expect a new game to run and definitely do not expect it to run well.

 

what games are we talking here?

 

3. Windows is getting boring

Who cares if it's boring though, it's just there to enable you to run programs.

 

 

You're getting old and boring, don't you remember when it used to be fun? :)

 

Nowadays i just want shit to work when i want it to.

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what games are we talking here?

Pretty much anything that doesn't run on Linux/steamOS in my Steam library (Skyrim, AoE, Subnautica, Mirrors Edge, SW: BF2, Fallout NV), as well as Zoo Tycoon and Splinter Cell (along with blacklist)

 

I still run windows, the only reason why i do is because of games.

I'm still probably gonna have windows running on one of my other drives, I did sorta say that

You're getting old and boring, don't you remember when it used to be fun? :)

everyone is constantly telling me to "grow up", am I doing it correctly?

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what games are we talking here?

Pretty much anything that doesn't run on Linux/steamOS in my Steam library (Skyrim, AoE, Subnautica, Mirrors Edge, SW: BF2, Fallout NV), as well as Zoo Tycoon and Splinter Cell (along with blacklist)

 

I still run windows, the only reason why i do is because of games.

I'm still probably gonna have windows running on one of my other drives, I did sorta say that

You're getting old and boring, don't you remember when it used to be fun? :)

everyone is constantly telling me to "grow up", am I doing it correctly?

 

 

A good portion of those games will work, give it a go but there *WILL* be issues that you will need to sort out.

 

Growing up is overrated.... Enjoy your youth while it lasts.

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and i'm surprised Cybes hasn't come in here and said something about "switching to a better OS" or "about time you left win7 in the past" XP

A man's gotta sleep. ;p

 

But seriously: 'nix is not my bag. Been there, two or three times before, and always had more issues than fun. Some people don't, or get off on fixing 'em, but that ain't me. AFAIC, it's a hobbyist project.

 

Don't let me stop you, though - go sample everything! I've been through OS/2, BeOS, a couple of DOSes, a couple of Linuxes, two actual UNIXes (for Uni), whatever that was the VAX ran, a couple of different iterations of Apple offerings, as well as *every* flavour of 'Doze - except Vista. You don't need to rush to do that, btw, it's just time.

 

Oh, and Win7..? I liked 7. It had some issues, sure, but it was their best to that date.

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> Arch

> least amount of head smashing

> keep most of the features of windows

 

 

 

> Arch

HAAAAhahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

 

Good luck!

 

 

Basically that.

 

You'll need a windows partition for those games.

 

Ubuntu is the only way to go if you plan to use it as a "Main OS". The others work, but the chances of "Application XYZ" being packaged for <obscure linux distro> is slim.

And you WILL spend time learning new apps and trying to make obscure things work if you go with something like Arch.

 

Windows 10 shouldn't be boring yet. They JUST added a whole bunch of cortana features to enable normal speech patterns

"Show me that photo I liked last Thursday" etc.

The latest version of DirectX has some cool commands which I expect to show some pretty rad performance increases.

The full incorporation with OneDrive has really made a big difference to productivity for a LOT of people.

Windows, and their current unified OS approach (Windows10 on Microsoft Watch, Surface, Phone, PC, Laptop, Tablet) is going to end up being 'big'.

Now is the most exciting time! There's so much on the horizon.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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2. I'm not amazing at Linux (or Unix) and based of some stuff a friend has said (who only uses OS X macOS for Adobe) that Arch is easier to learn off than Gentoo

Arch and Gentoo are the most autistic distros. They're complicated for the sake of being complicated, they pander to the obsessive nature of the people that use them.

 

If you want to use your computer to actually do things, Ubuntu, Mint or Suse are better choices.

 

I agree. The learning curve of Mint / Ubuntu can help you before diving in the deep end of Gentoo / Arch / Rolling your own (LFS)

 

 

3. Windows is getting boring

Who cares if it's boring though, it's just there to enable you to run programs.

 

An OS is a means to an end and if the change is for the learnings then 100% I'd be recommending a dual boot.

 

 

I switched to Xubuntu as my desktop over a year ago and have not looked back. I'm fortunate though because the games I play start with 'D' and end in 'ota2' so don't have to faff about with WINE.

I also am Team Green and the Nvidia binary driver is about as stable as the WHQL driver however you do lose the Nvidia Experience. That's a pro or a con depending on who you are. I do miss Shadowplay but OBS works well enough.

 

Keep in mind that you're walking a path that many before you have already tread. Assuming your Googlefu is good your issues are solvable :-)

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and i'm surprised Cybes hasn't come in here and said something about "switching to a better OS" or "about time you left win7 in the past" XP

A man's gotta sleep. ;p

 

Oh, and Win7..? I liked 7. It had some issues, sure, but it was their best to that date.

 

Sleep is for the weak, and what about all that stuff about "you shouldn't be on such a slow OS"? XP

 

 

> Arch

> least amount of head smashing

> keep most of the features of windows

 

 

 

> Arch

HAAAAhahahahahahahahahahahahahaha.

 

Good luck!

 

 

Basically that.

 

You'll need a windows partition for those games.

 

Ubuntu is the only way to go if you plan to use it as a "Main OS". The others work, but the chances of "Application XYZ" being packaged for <obscure linux distro> is slim.

And you WILL spend time learning new apps and trying to make obscure things work if you go with something like Arch.

 

Windows 10 shouldn't be boring yet. They JUST added a whole bunch of cortana features to enable normal speech patterns

"Show me that photo I liked last Thursday" etc.

The latest version of DirectX has some cool commands which I expect to show some pretty rad performance increases.

The full incorporation with OneDrive has really made a big difference to productivity for a LOT of people.

Windows, and their current unified OS approach (Windows10 on Microsoft Watch, Surface, Phone, PC, Laptop, Tablet) is going to end up being 'big'.

Now is the most exciting time! There's so much on the horizon.

 

I have said this before and will say it again, I don't like windows 10, idgaf what other people say, I just don't like it.

 

 

2. I'm not amazing at Linux (or Unix) and based of some stuff a friend has said (who only uses OS X macOS for Adobe) that Arch is easier to learn off than Gentoo

Arch and Gentoo are the most autistic distros. They're complicated for the sake of being complicated, they pander to the obsessive nature of the people that use them.

 

If you want to use your computer to actually do things, Ubuntu, Mint or Suse are better choices.

 

I agree. The learning curve of Mint / Ubuntu can help you before diving in the deep end of Gentoo / Arch / Rolling your own (LFS)

 

 

3. Windows is getting boring

Who cares if it's boring though, it's just there to enable you to run programs.

 

An OS is a means to an end and if the change is for the learnings then 100% I'd be recommending a dual boot.

 

 

I switched to Xubuntu as my desktop over a year ago and have not looked back. I'm fortunate though because the games I play start with 'D' and end in 'ota2' so don't have to faff about with WINE.

I also am Team Green and the Nvidia binary driver is about as stable as the WHQL driver however you do lose the Nvidia Experience. That's a pro or a con depending on who you are. I do miss Shadowplay but OBS works well enough.

 

Keep in mind that you're walking a path that many before you have already tread. Assuming your Googlefu is good your issues are solvable :-)

 

One does not need Googlefu when one has access to the best forum on the internets :p

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I have said this before and will say it again, I don't like windows 10, idgaf what other people say, I just don't like it.

 

 

 

 

Well get fucking used to it, it's not going anywhere.

It's the final version of the operating system, and will be around for probably the rest of your life.

From now on its 'patch updates' like OSX.

 

If its one thing I hate, that really pushes my buttons its ignorance and lack of logic.

You've never once been able to provide creditable reasoning behind this discrimination.

 

Its the same mindset that keeps Australia on fucking copper phone lines

"We have had internet for ages, so what if the new offering is better in ever way, I don't like it, stick with copper"

.......frustrating.

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Well get fucking used to it, it's not going anywhere.

It's the final version of the operating system, and will be around for probably the rest of your life.

From now on its 'patch updates' like OSX.

 

If its one thing I hate, that really pushes my buttons its ignorance and lack of logic.

You've never once been able to provide creditable reasoning behind this discrimination.

 

Its the same mindset that keeps Australia on fucking copper phone lines

"We have had internet for ages, so what if the new offering is better in ever way, I don't like it, stick with copper"

.......frustrating.

 

It's not that I don't want to upgrade to a better and more advanced OS, it's just that my own personal opinion is that I don't like it, I have tested and tried to like it, I have said this before also, but I just don't like it........

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Its the same mindset that keeps Australia on fucking copper phone lines

"We have had internet for ages, so what if the new offering is better in ever way, I don't like it, stick with copper"

.......frustrating.

That's not the argument being used at all.

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Well get fucking used to it, it's not going anywhere.

It's the final version of the operating system, and will be around for probably the rest of your life.

From now on its 'patch updates' like OSX.

 

If its one thing I hate, that really pushes my buttons its ignorance and lack of logic.

You've never once been able to provide creditable reasoning behind this discrimination.

 

Its the same mindset that keeps Australia on fucking copper phone lines

"We have had internet for ages, so what if the new offering is better in ever way, I don't like it, stick with copper"

.......frustrating.

 

It's not that I don't want to upgrade to a better and more advanced OS, it's just that my own personal opinion is that I don't like it, I have tested and tried to like it, I have said this before also, but I just don't like it........

 

 

I still maintain that if I were to install Classic Shell, you'd never be able to tell the difference.

Somehow you think you can.

 

When you're a little older, you'll learn that "I don't like X, because I don't like X" never gets you very far.

You can't hate a product just because its better.

 

Between people its called discrimination.

In a professional world it's called a Bias.

On a social level, its called Bullying.

On a relationship level, its called being Stubborn.

 

None of the above gets you very far in life.

All it does is tell people to ignore your opinion, because its based on "personal opinion", not intelligence or fact.

 

 

Either way.

Install Ubuntu and move on with life.

 

Its the same mindset that keeps Australia on fucking copper phone lines

"We have had internet for ages, so what if the new offering is better in ever way, I don't like it, stick with copper"

.......frustrating.

That's not the argument being used at all.

 

 

It really seems to be, to my eyes.

"The copper is good enough, use it, it clearly works"

"No, its not good enough, please replace it with something better and more reliable"

 

Sure the argument is based on dollars, but its still how it feels to me.

"This works, why move to something better?"

..... because its better? no?

Edited by Master_Scythe

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It really seems to be, to my eyes.

"The copper is good enough, use it, it clearly works"

"No, its not good enough, please replace it with something better and more reliable"

Nobody, not even Mr Turnbull when he was shadow communications minister, suggested that VDSL2 would be the endgame, but rather it's a measure so that people on ADSL2+ can get reasonable speed in a year or three, instead of a decade or more.

 

Sure the argument is based on dollars, but its still how it feels to me.

"This works, why move to something better?"

..... because its better? no?

We would always move to something better in the long run, the idea of FTTN is to get more coverage sooner. Cheaper is debatable, a sweetener at best.

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It really seems to be, to my eyes.

"The copper is good enough, use it, it clearly works"

"No, its not good enough, please replace it with something better and more reliable"

Nobody, not even Mr Turnbull when he was shadow communications minister, suggested that VDSL2 would be the endgame, but rather it's a measure so that people on ADSL2+ can get reasonable speed in a year or three, instead of a decade or more.

 

Sure the argument is based on dollars, but its still how it feels to me.

"This works, why move to something better?"

..... because its better? no?

We would always move to something better in the long run, the idea of FTTN is to get more coverage sooner. Cheaper is debatable, a sweetener at best.

 

 

It was never portrayed that way in the media, or if it was, it was done poorly.

 

The two arguments I've watched time and time\read time and time again, was that: "We need fiber to the home, the copper is too poor to guarantee a reliable connection"

and the counter was always "It works now, it'll continue to work in the future"

 

If the REASON behind that was to speed deployment\coverage, well that would make sense, but the argument, at least the tens of ones I've seen has never been "How can we get low to medium speed internet to people ASAP" it was always "Why should we (or shouldn't we) use Fiber to the premises?" and the counter was always "Coppers already there".

 

Eh, whatever, its off topic, you're probably right, but the TV has made a poor case portraying it that way.

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It was never portrayed that way in the media, or if it was, it was done poorly.

Media coverage of the NBN has been patchy at best. Worse, you've been exposed to tech-forum coverage, which is mostly selfish, entitled nerds whose nickle-and-dime-minmax lobes would be offended by "only" getting 78Mbps when their neighbour gets 80.

 

The two arguments I've watched time and time\read time and time again, was that: "We need fiber to the home, the copper is too poor to guarantee a reliable connection"

and the counter was always "It works now, it'll continue to work in the future"

There's fragments of truth in all of it, sadly. Some people's copper is in a bad state, other people's copper is in a good state, and can deliver hundreds of megabits per second if leveraged effectively.

 

If the REASON behind that was to speed deployment\coverage, well that would make sense, but the argument, at least the tens of ones I've seen has never been "How can we get low to medium speed internet to people ASAP" it was always "Why should we (or shouldn't we) use Fiber to the premises?" and the counter was always "Coppers already there".

The thing is, that's correct. The copper IS already there, and that IS the argument for leveraging it. Use it where it's up to scratch, and mediate/replace with fibre where it's not.

 

Eh, whatever, its off topic, you're probably right, but the TV has made a poor case portraying it that way.

It is, and it has! ;)

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Good on you for wanting to make the switch to Linux. I made the switch last year after I realised that Windows 10 was full of sneaky 'features' that behave very much like malware. Plus, for the highly security-conscious (read: paranoid), Linux is a much better choice because it uses much simpler code that seems to have fewer vulnerabilities. Furthermore, given that it's not as popular as Windows, much less effort is spent developing new exploits and malware for Linux than what is spent on trying to hack Windows. Finally, I find that Windows often doesn't do as it's told and gives cryptic error messages that aren't explained very well in user documentation and on support forums. This then requires one to trawl through large chunks of system logs and memory dumps in order to isolate and debug the problem. On the other hand, I find that the error messages that Linux gives are usually pretty self-explanatory and that the large volume of user-maintained user documentation that exists for most Linux distros resolves most issues that one might encounter.

 

If you're looking for a system that's designed with IT-illiterate users in mind and want to play games and use the applications that are the most popular and widespread, then stick with Windows, but remember that you'll have a cunt of a time trying to stop Microsoft from grabbing your personal information and personal data and sharing it with its advertising partners. This seems to be their new way of enhancing their profits and even if you turn off the 'diagnostic' and 'ad personalisation' features, you can count on Microsoft sneakily re-enabling these 'features' (or sneakily introducing new ones) in their next updates. As I said, Windows exhibits a lot of behaviour that one would find in viruses and malware.

 

But if you want an OS that you can build and customise from the ground up, that does exactly as it's told provided it's set up properly and that is built from source code that is publicly available and that has been reviewed and scrutinised by many experts from all over the world, then make the switch to Linux. If you've never used Linux, there will be a learning curve, but I found the journey very worthwhile. Installing and customising ArchLinux taught me a lot about how operating systems work and dramatically improved my IT skills from where they were when I first made the switch. I also haven't looked back ever since I made the switch - I now use either ArchLinux or Kali as my primary operating systems (depending on what I'm doing) and I keep Windows in its nice little VirtualBox and only let it out to play when I want to run something that only runs on Windows, or when I'm developing something for a Windows platform. Running Windows in a VM means that I can take snapshots and go back to them if any update gives me grief. It also means that I can easily test new software and (worst-case scenario) kill it without losing my main OS.

 

I'm not going to pretend that it was easy and simple to switch to Linux, but from your other posts it seems to me like you're into coding and aren't afraid of learning how to solve complex IT issues. If I'm right about this, then not only will you probably be able to set up ArchLinux more easily than someone with no coding knowledge, but you'll probably fall in love with it and find that it's a developer's playground.

 

The best place to start learning about ArchLinux is probably the Wiki page - you can access it from http://www.archlinux.org . The Installation Guide and Beginner's Guide contain all the information that you need to get a basic ArchLinux installation running. Other pages cover the installation of a window manager and desktop environment, which you'll need to install in order to get a graphical user interface.

 

I'm also in the process of writing some user documentation on how to install ArchLinux with an encrypted root partition - I'm doing this for an assignment, but will post it online after I've submitted it. If you watch this space, I'll post a link here when it's done.

 

I've also set up a number of ArchLinux systems for learning, testing and development purposes in the last few months and have probably run into (and had to resolve) many of the common pitfalls. I've experimented with the Gnome, KDE Plasma and MATE as desktop environments and am happy to help point you in the right direction if you get stuck with anything.

 

Good luck! :-)

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If you're looking for a system that's designed with IT-illiterate users in mind and want to play games and use the applications that are the most popular and widespread, then stick with Windows, but remember that you'll have a cunt of a time trying to stop Microsoft from grabbing your personal information and personal data and sharing it with its advertising partners. This seems to be their new way of enhancing their profits and even if you turn off the 'diagnostic' and 'ad personalisation' features, you can count on Microsoft sneakily re-enabling these 'features' (or sneakily introducing new ones) in their next updates. As I said, Windows exhibits a lot of behaviour that one would find in viruses and malware.

 

(quickly, who were you again? I remember this is a new account of an old user......)

 

This is why safer-networking (our beloved SpybotSD) released Anti-Becon!

Works wonders.

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Good on you for wanting to make the switch to Linux. I made the switch last year after I realised that Windows 10 was full of sneaky 'features' that behave very much like malware. Plus, for the highly security-conscious (read: paranoid), I find that Windows often doesn't do as it's told and gives cryptic error messages that aren't explained very well in user documentation and on support forums.

 

If you're looking for a system that's designed with IT-illiterate users in mind and want to play games and use the applications that are the most popular and widespread, then stick with Windows,

 

But if you want an OS that you can build and customise from the ground up, that does exactly as it's told provided it's set up properly and that is built from source code that is publicly available and that has been reviewed and scrutinised by many experts from all over the world, then make the switch to Linux.

 

I'm not going to pretend that it was easy and simple to switch to Linux, but from your other posts it seems to me like you're into coding and aren't afraid of learning how to solve complex IT issues. If I'm right about this, then not only will you probably be able to set up ArchLinux more easily than someone with no coding knowledge, but you'll probably fall in love with it and find that it's a developer's playground.

 

The best place to start learning about ArchLinux is probably the Wiki page - you can access it from http://www.archlinux.org . The Installation Guide and Beginner's Guide contain all the information that you need to get a basic ArchLinux installation running. Other pages cover the installation of a window manager and desktop environment, which you'll need to install in order to get a graphical user interface.

 

I'm also in the process of writing some user documentation on how to install ArchLinux with an encrypted root partition - I'm doing this for an assignment, but will post it online after I've submitted it. If you watch this space, I'll post a link here when it's done.

 

Good luck! :-)

Haha! Take that Scythe! And yeah you got it pretty spot on with the "into coding and aren't afraid of learning how to solve complex IT problems", thanks for all the info too, really helpful :) and who needs GUIs? GUIs are for peasants!

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