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slayme1974

Replacing and American computer with an Australian PSU

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I've just been doing some thinking. This is pure curiosity nothing else but if someone bought a computer from America, and it somehow couldn't run at 240v (I know, most have a switch that can convert the voltage) would putting an Australian psu in it make it work ok? or would they have to replace other components too?

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That's all that's needed. For the most part, all components are internationally compatible. Though there's differences with wifi in some countries where certain channels aren't used though often that's a software or firmware thing and usually only relevant at the AP/router end.

Analog and digital TV tuners/capture devices, every one I've had anything to do with has been dual standard (though chances are Secam wasn't well supported).

 

For the base system stuff though there should be no differences, base clock crystals on PCs have practically forever been based on multiples of the NTSC colour clock, then PLL multipliers give the larger clocks which the system needs.

AC power frequency is irrelevant, everything runs of DC. Some older computers had RTCs that relied on a low-voltage AC waveform as a timebase.

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Pretty much most things other than power is international standards. Stuff like tv tuning, WiFi and 3G/4G are country dependent.

Edited by Jeruselem

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Pretty much most things other than power is international standards. Stuff like tv tuning, WiFi and 3G/4G are country dependent.

 

PARTS OF the wifi spectrum is country dependent.

 

SOME channels, and SOME features come and go based on region, but even then, 90% of wifi and 4G features will be fine no matter where you go.

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Pretty much most things other than power is international standards. Stuff like tv tuning, WiFi and 3G/4G are country dependent.

 

PARTS OF the wifi spectrum is country dependent.

 

SOME channels, and SOME features come and go based on region, but even then, 90% of wifi and 4G features will be fine no matter where you go.

 

 

Still, you have to check what channels are on the device. Phones from say Samsung, Apple, Nokia, Microsoft, and other Internationals should be that 90% you're talking about. Some phones just for say the Chinese market might not have the bands you want.

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it would cost more when replacing

 

Incorrect.

 

i think upgrading is better than replacing... Well it's my personal opinion :)

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it would cost more when replacing

 

Incorrect.

 

i think upgrading is better than replacing... Well it's my personal opinion :)

 

 

But there is no way to "upgrade" a power supply in this instance. You're simply replacing a USA power supply (110v) with an Australian one (220~240v)

There is no real 'upgrade' in this instance

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(I know, most have a switch that can convert the voltage)

Not even that now. The vast majority of PSUs have active PFC which means they are input voltage independent (within reason). So the majority of computer PSUs can now handle 110 to 240v out of the box.

 

What you have to be aware of is PSUs from other countries may not be have the appropriate compliance label and therefore are not supposed to be used in Australia.

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(I know, most have a switch that can convert the voltage)

Not even that now. The vast majority of PSUs have active PFC which means they are input voltage independent (within reason). So the majority of computer PSUs can now handle 110 to 240v out of the box.

 

What you have to be aware of is PSUs from other countries may not be have the appropriate compliance label and therefore are not supposed to be used in Australia.

 

Makes sense, PSUs need to meet international standards and you don't want to be making like different versions for different countries anyway.

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it would cost more when replacing

 

Incorrect.

 

i think upgrading is better than replacing... Well it's my personal opinion :)

 

 

But there is no way to "upgrade" a power supply in this instance. You're simply replacing a USA power supply (110v) with an Australian one (220~240v)

There is no real 'upgrade' in this instance

 

good share

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