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Master_Scythe

Does the FCC have power here? NBN?

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Just curious if we're going to end up seeing a nice big reduction in rates after someone forms a class action against the NBN.

 

The reason I'm wondering, is because of this:

"Federal Communications Commission has voted to change the definition of broadband by raising the minimum download speeds needed from 4Mbps to 25Mbps, and the minimum upload speed from 1Mbps to 3Mbps"

And depending on what 'service' ends up getting put in by majority, a lot are only promising 24mbps down..... Meaning people will sign up to a "National Broadband Network" and not get Broadband.

 

Now, I'm no lawyer, but there have been class action lawsuits against similar misleading funded projects.

Calling it a BROADBAND network, and not providing BROADBAND is, I think, a cause for someone to start something.

 

I'm purely speculating here, I'm no lawyer, and I stopped 'keeping hope' for NBN probably a year ago, so I'm probably way behind.

 

Is there still risk of people getting less than 25Mbps on a 'broadband' network? And if so, what can we, the public, do?

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Will someone sue the Australian Govt/NBNCo, because the FCC in the US has defined 'broadband' differently?

 

lolno. We have our own definitions.

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FCC has SFA to do with us though that said there's plenty of places that would follow their lead for stuff like standards relating to RF noise emission controls and the like.

 

Even at 4 mbps "Broadband" there's plenty of people getting ripped off. Did a recent quick Speedtest.net run somewhere and they were getting a paltry 2.7, funnily enough the upload wasn't tea-bag at about 0.5

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Right, I had no idea it was a USA thing, so was just curious.

 

What does Australia define Broadband speed as being?

And if we don't have one, might referencing another large organization such as the FCC be a leg to stand on?

 

I'm just curious if 'the people' are ever going to 'get one back' from the government for the waste of money and time it's been.

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Wouldn't surprise me if anything over 64kbps downstream is classed as broadband. Or maybe 128... wasn't there an improvement to POTS type modems where they were able to squeeze 128 down in ideal conditions?

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Wouldn't surprise me if anything over 64kbps downstream is classed as broadband. Or maybe 128... wasn't there an improvement to POTS type modems where they were able to squeeze 128 down in ideal conditions?

 

Nich will probably shed some light :) He's mentioned he knows we have our own definitions.

I suppose it wont surprise me if its 56k+.... which will be bullshit.....

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:)

 

I don't think we have a "broadband" definition in Oz, but no, the FCC has no mandate here at all - in better news NBN is supposed to be down my street in four weeks - probably going to be FTTN but should improve on this rubbish ADSL and for the same price :)

 

Cheers

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Knowing our stupid antiqued system, 64K ISDN is "broadband" ...

 

Speaking of NBN, our Perth office just got NBN - we thought it was getting FTTP but no it's FTTN. Fine, but the routers we use don't the VDSL2! You need VDSL2 for FTTN, and we've had to order new ones ... grrr

Edited by Jeruselem

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ISDN is rare as hen's teeth nowadays.

 

From http://www.nbnco.com.au/utility/glossary-of-terms.html (lol go figure):

Broadband

Broadband is a term used to refer to 'always on' high speed Internet. In the past, broadband services and technologies were defined in terms of a capability to transfer information at higher rates than traditional dial-up services. Today broadband is more commonly associated with the speeds equal to or greater than those provided by Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL), that is, a minimum download speed of 265 kbps and minimum upload speed of 64 kbps

 

There's been talk of updating the USO for a long time, but a new burst of activist activity last year, see below:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-30/new-coalition-to-lobby-for-telco-improvements-in-the-bush/8075218

https://www.internet.org.au/docs/media/458-24-july-2016-news-release-internet-australia-responds-to-productivity-commission-uso-inquiry-the-internet-is-for-everyone/file

https://www.lightningbroadband.com.au/news/broadband-telecommunications-uso-lbb2243/

 

 

Judging from a friend's recent/long-going dispute with Telstra and his home connection, I'd say that 'broadband' is faster than either a 512kbps or 1.5mbps connection, for the purposes of getting faults fixed that interfere with speed. But there's no legislative enforcable definition. Yet.

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I did a paper for uni for my grad dip on the internet.

At the time, the 1990s - dialup was king and ISDN was still used.

Talk of 1 mbps was just wow then.

 

That nbn co definition of broadband is so 1990s

Edited by Jeruselem

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Our version of the FCC is ACMA and since they are a government department, there's Buckley's they'll define broadband in a way that sees another government outfit get sued.

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Commission, statutory body, authority - much the same thing.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_Communications_and_Media_Authority

 

 


We do this by fostering an innovative communications and media environment that balances the needs of both industry and the Australian community through regulation, education and advice.

 

Nice of them to edit their own Wiki page... FFS.

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