Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Master_Scythe

Adult ADD

Recommended Posts

Anyone got it?

A friend suggested I look into it.

 

I find myself needing to be mentally stimulated every minute of the day.

I get 'head nod' drowsy nearly instantly if the topic isn't challenging to my mind (which makes socializing SUPER hard).

I can't keep my mind on one project and complete any of them anymore, I have about 10+ projects 'half done'.

And worst of all, my usually great memory is shot. Long term is still great, but I can forget the phone call details I had 2 minutes ago.

And the list could go on and on.

 

It all started when I was physically unable to focus anymore (Vision being too bad), but it's just slowly getting more annoying.

 

It's just frustrating and I'll probably go see a GP, but I thought I'd ask if anyone knows anything about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know that the "adult" qualifier is necessary.

 

ADD with some autistic tendencies seems like a pretty good description, at least for your persona on here. (And I mean that in the most objective not-trying-to-be-mean way possible)

 

There's no "autism" or "Asperger's" diagnosis anymore, it's a spectrum, with a diagnosis recorded as "ASD".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know that the "adult" qualifier is necessary.

ADD with some autistic tendencies seems like a pretty good description, at least for your persona on here. (And I mean that in the most objective not-trying-to-be-mean way possible)

There's no "autism" or "Asperger's" diagnosis anymore, it's a spectrum, with a diagnosis recorded as "ASD".

 

I know you mean no harm man :)

One of my IT clients is a Psych; I was having a casual chat with him months ago, he's oldschool, and, paraphrasing our discussion:

 

"I hate this spectrum crap, you either suffer from a condition, or you don't. Could I place you on the spectrum? Yeah, but I could place literally anyone on it, anyone! The question is; Do you live with it, or suffer from it? And I'd say you live with it, and in the 'old methods', I'd have not diagnosed you".

 

And I say that's rather fitting.

It certainly manifests itself MUCH MORE in writing. I almost never (once a year?) have social problems in the 'real world'.

You'd probably expect a very different personality IRL than who you'd meet :) (we really should do that....)

Offline, I'm much more 'normal' and less.....pedantic? Real world issues bother me much less than 'online issues'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a sanity check, have you referenced the diagnostic criteria for ADHD?

 

Using DSM-5, several of the individual's ADHD symptoms must be present prior to age 12 years, compared to 7 years as the age of onset in DSM-IV.

 

If a number of the symptoms haven't been present since childhood, and are instead something you've experienced more recently, it might be something else.

 

How well does the following describe you?

  • Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of the day, nearly every day.
  • Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain (e.g., a change of more than 5% of body weight in a month), or decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day.
  • Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day.
  • Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (observable by others, not merely subjective feelings of restlessness or being slowed down). [i.e. you're either lethargic, or hyperactive]
  • Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day.
  • Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day (either by subjective account or as observed by others).
Edited by tastywheat
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a sanity check, have you referenced the diagnostic criteria for ADHD?

Using DSM-5, several of the individual's ADHD symptoms must be present prior to age 12 years, compared to 7 years as the age of onset in DSM-IV.

 

It was about 9 or 10 years ago it started, when my eyes went bad (I think its related). Its just recently got worse.

IMO it's vision related. can't focus physically so can't focus mentally.

 

If a number of the symptoms haven't been present since childhood, and are instead something you've experienced more recently, it might be something else.

How well does the following describe you?

  • Markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of the day, nearly every day.

    Yep, I only have one (joint) pleasure, and that's music while driving.

    and it HAS to be over 170bpm or I lose interest within seconds. 200+BPM is preferable if I don't want to skip tracks half way through.

  • Significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain (e.g., a change of more than 5% of body weight in a month), or decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day.

    With my body, I don't think this is an appropriate factor. My body and diet are 'odd'.

  • Insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day.

    Both. I can stay up 48 hours and not feel at all tired, so long as I don't slow down.

    Likewise, if I'm well rested, and someone talks about a boring topic, I literally 'nod' asleep within 5 minutes. Its embarrassing.

  • Psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day (observable by others, not merely subjective feelings of restlessness or being slowed down). [i.e. you're either lethargic, or hyperactive]

    Not physically, but if I use googles definition, yes "abruptly starting and stopping tasks, rapid talking, racing thoughts and ideas".

  • Fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day.

    Only when I stop. I don't run out of energy so long as i'm active at a minimum power-walk pace.

  • Diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day (either by subjective account or as observed by others).

    Both, and by both myself and others.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing that suggests it's not ADD from my perspective is that you mention that you have good long term memory, and that until recently had good short term memory. ADD implies a fundamental difference in the way a brain is wired, which precludes good memory pretty much by definition.

 

The symptoms I listed were 6 of the 9 DSM-V criteria for depression. You've identified that at least 4, maybe 5 of the symptoms are present, which typically implies a positive diagnosis. Note that depression doesn't always present with 'depressed moods', though if this is something else you're experiencing, it further increases the likelihood of a positive diagnosis.

 

Regardless of whether it's ADD, depression, or something else, the symptoms you've acknowledged are a sure sign that you need to talk to your GP about it, and get an expert opinion.

Edited by tastywheat
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing that suggests it's not ADD from my perspective is that you mention that you have good long term memory, and that until recently had good short term memory. ADD implies a fundamental difference in the way a brain is wired, which precludes good memory pretty much by definition.

 

The symptoms I listed were 6 of the 9 DSM-V criteria for depression. You've identified that at least 4, maybe 5 of the symptoms are present, which typically implies a positive diagnosis. Note that depression doesn't always present with 'depressed moods', though if this is something else you're experiencing, it further increases the likelihood of a positive diagnosis.

 

Regardless of whether it's ADD, depression, or something else, the symptoms you've acknowledged are a sure sign that you need to talk to your GP about it, and get an expert opinion.

 

Ive been through depression when my eyes went bad. I know what that 'feels' like.

I'm well and truly out the other side. I wake up happy, I go to bed happy, I work happy.

If I hadn't been there, I'd consider it, because I remember well, unless you know what you're looking for "You don't feel depressed" , its surreal.

 

It's just that I can't complete a task, I can't hold a conversation unless its technical, and I can't "do one thing".

 

Example; right now; I'm talking to you, I'm listening to some speedcore on my headphones, with a youtube video playing (muted with subtitles).

All while at work, and staying on top of my tasks. *shrug*.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This resource might help narrow the diagnosis:

http://totallyadd.com/23-signs-you-do-not-have-adhd/

But really, you need to see a professional.

 

Any idea if GP's can actually help? Or am I just going to 'get a referral' from them.

I'm out of sick leave this year; it's all booked for dental and eye surgery..... yuck. (though I'll take the eye surgery over the dental THANK YOU!)

 

EDIT: Huh, friend who's a GP (as they're a friend, they can't officially be mine), said to also look into 'Absence Seizures', because I have a history....

But that wouldn't explain the never-ending, or instant loss of energy....

Edited by Master_Scythe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any idea if GP's can actually help? Or am I just going to 'get a referral' from them.

I'm out of sick leave this year; it's all booked for dental and eye surgery..... yuck. (though I'll take the eye surgery over the dental THANK YOU!)

 

A GP will be able to give a general diagnosis, but you'll likely need a psych referral for a specific diagnosis and treatment. Assuming you don't have private health insurance with extras cover, a GP care plan will give you 10 bulk billed psych visits, so very minimal out of pocket expense. Psych clinics typically offer a limited number of evening and weekend appointments, so you won't have to worry about it interfering with work.

 

Standard treatment for ADD is cognitive behavioural therapy via a Psychologist, with suggested lifestyle and diet changes. If your disorder is significantly interfering with everyday functioning, you'll also get a referral to a Psychiatrist, who will generally prescribe amphetamines (dexamphetamine) or Methylphenidate (a stimulant similar in structure to amphetamines). A less common alternative is Atomoxetine (a norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor), which avoids the addiction potential of amphetamines/Methylphenidate, but comes with a raft of unpleasant side effects.

 

Good luck with it mate, I'm sorry to hear you're unwell.

Edited by tastywheat
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How's the sugar, caffeine and other stimulant intake? Going overboard on one or more is a pretty good way to fuck your concentration ability up. Likewise with getting chronic lack of sleep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How's the sugar, caffeine and other stimulant intake? Going overboard on one or more is a pretty good way to fuck your concentration ability up. Likewise with getting chronic lack of sleep.

 

Sugar is VERY low. (low carb high protein diet); Stimulant is high.

Large "pre-workout" levels of caffeine really help me calm down, and focus on conversations.

I get...... fidgety... without it.

I cycled off for about 3 months (I like to 'check I'm not addicted' often);

Main reason I take it, is because they allow my vision to focus.

Yep, sounds odd. AND my Opthom didn't believe me either, until we did a back-to-back eye exam, and yep, when 'stimulated' I constantly score better on both eye charts, and peripheral recognition tests.

non-scientific theory, is that with such 'different eyes' my brain needs that boost to be able to put 2+2 together and get 4.

 

Even better was DMAA, but that's banned now. (I used to be able to read when taking that!)

DMHA is apparently worth trying.

But for at least a year now, purely caffeine.

Edited by Master_Scythe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Opposite than expected reaction to stimulants seems to be evidence you might have it.

Seems diagnosis is a process of evaluating evidence and history rather than a physical or chemical identification process.

Seems also ADHD shares symptoms and behaviours of other mental illnesses like bipolar, depression, anxiety among others.

 

But the bottom line seems to be that it's not something that suddenly comes on in an adult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Opposite than expected reaction to stimulants seems to be evidence you might have it.

Seems diagnosis is a process of evaluating evidence and history rather than a physical or chemical identification process.

Seems also ADHD shares symptoms and behaviours of other mental illnesses like bipolar, depression, anxiety among others.

 

But the bottom line seems to be that it's not something that suddenly comes on in an adult.

 

True.

I've always associated it with my eye thing.

Once I couldn't physically focus on an object, I just thought this was normal. "If you can't focus, you can't focus" just... made sense.

But I guess only recently, going out often and such, have I noticed it affects me on a social level.

 

For now, large doses of pre-workout seem to work. But It's just something I think I'll see a doctor about some time this year. See what he thinks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't it a bit irresponsible to be taking high doses of a banned substance that's been documented to cause rhabdomyolysis (muscles cell death), among other things? DMHA is structurally similar to DMAA, modified mostly to get around regulations, and without clinical testing that would demonstrate safety.

 

For someone with your symptoms, particularly degenerative eyesight that presumably related to some form of muscular dystrophy, it really does seem like an unwise decision. If you need stimulates to function, safe options are readily available from your GP. Why gamble on your health, if you could take ownership of it, and get it properly sorted?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't it a bit irresponsible to be taking high doses of a banned substance that's been documented to cause rhabdomyolysis (muscles cell death), among other things? DMHA is structurally similar to DMAA, modified mostly to get around regulations, and without clinical testing that would demonstrate safety.

 

For someone with your symptoms, particularly degenerative eyesight that presumably related to some form of muscular dystrophy, it really does seem like an unwise decision. If you need stimulates to function, safe options are readily available from your GP. Why gamble on your health, if you could take ownership of it, and get it properly sorted?

 

It was only low doses of DMAA (half the usual).

Let me more than halve my caffiene intake, which I needed

 

And nah, my eyes are genetic and not muscle related.

But that was a year ago, been banned for a while.

 

 

Ah well, I'll see what a GP says sometime.

Edited by Master_Scythe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am on medication for mood disorder and bipolar and I have had the problem since 1974.I found it interesting some of the

 

 

links put up by tastywheat , its typical of depression. Also have panic attacks on and off,but the walking into room and forgetting what you are there for is one that

 

 

pisses me off now!!!! Had to laugh about the stapler comment.The only thing that would calm me down after a panic attack was zanax,been taken off the market now,

 

 

but still have a bottle or two.I found that valium was no good for me I could take them like jelly beans with no real affect [maybe from the other shit I was on] I would

 

 

certainly be seeing a GP to start with.Good luck :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×