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Too Many Damn Lakes! Intel's coming CPU's

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Massive security flaw found in Intel CPUs, patch could hit performance by up to 30%

 

Almost every Intel processor manufactured over the last decade contains a major security flaw that could be exploited in severe attacks. If that isn’t bad enough, patching the issue might slow down the performance of a CPU by up to 35 percent.

 

The exact details of the vulnerability have been placed under an embargo to give Intel time to work on a fix. According to The Register, the flaw could allow normal user programs to see some of the content of protected kernel memory areas, which means any malicious programs might be able to read information like passwords, login keys, files cached from disk, and more.

 

“Imagine a piece of JavaScript running in a browser, or malicious software running on a shared public cloud server, able to sniff sensitive kernel-protected data,” wrote The Register.

 

As the problem is within the Intel x86-64 hardware, it can’t be fixed with a microcode update; instead, an OS-level fix is required for the affected operating systems, which includes Windows, Linux, and macOS.

 

The immediate solution comes in the form of a kernel Page Table Isolation (PTI), which separates the kernel’s memory from user processes. But this solution increases the kernel’s overhead, causing the system to slow down by five to 30 percent, “depending on the task and processor model.”

 

These KPTI [Kernel Page Table Isolation] patches move the kernel into a completely separate address space, so it’s not just invisible to a running process, it’s not even there at all. Really, this shouldn’t be needed, but clearly there is a flaw in Intel’s silicon that allows kernel access protections to be bypassed in some way.

 

The downside to this separation is that it is relatively expensive, time wise, to keep switching between two separate address spaces for every system call and for every interrupt from the hardware. These context switches do not happen instantly, and they force the processor to dump cached data and reload information from memory. This increases the kernel’s overhead, and slows down the computer.

 

Your Intel-powered machine will run slower as a result.It seems companies that use virtualized environments are the biggest targets for those looking to exploit the vulnerability. "There are hints the attack impacts common virtualization environments including Amazon EC2 and Google Compute Engine,” wrote Python Sweetness. Microsoft, Amazon, and Google are all working on fixes set to be implemented over the next week.

 

For everyday users, it's possible the patches won’t have much of an impact on everyday usage and gaming frame rates. Additionally, future fixes should have less of an effect on performance.

Intel rival AMD has already used the vulnerability as a way of promoting its processors, which it says aren’t affected due to their extra security protections.

 

“AMD processors are not subject to the types of attacks that the kernel page table isolation feature protects against,” wrote Thomas Lendacky, a member of the Linux OS group at AMD. “The AMD microarchitecture does not allow memory references, including speculative references, that access higher privileged data when running in a lesser privileged mode when that access would result in a page fault.”

 

So the huge security flaw in the IME and their processors too. That's a disaster from the world's leading supplier of PC and Server processing units. And with the performance hit.. Ryzen looks even better.

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Apparently if you have a skylake or newer, you wouldn't notice. Older intel would be ones seeing the difference.

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I don't know about servers, but desktop is that case. Microsoft have patched Windows 10 now, just get the new windows update.

I haven't seen any difference on my laptop.

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Apparently storage intensive IO tasks is where the hurt is being felt. Good news for AMd on the Server side of things I suppose.

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Posted (edited)

Modders get Coffee Lake CPU running on 200/100-series chipset motherboards

Intel’s 8th-generation Coffee Lake desktop chips might have upped the core count and include “the best gaming CPU ever,” but it was disappointing to learn that they are only compatible with new 300-series motherboards. It appears, however, that with a little tinkering it's possible to get some of these processors working on both 200-series and 100-series chipset mobos.

Even though they use the same LGA 1151 socket that’s been around since Skylake launched in 2015, Intel says its Coffee Lake chips are not compatible with 200/100-series motherboards. The company said this is because of more pins being allocated for power delivery, which is a requirement due to the six-core configurations.

 

But over on the Win-Raid forums, rootuser123, LittleHill, dsanke, elisw, Mov AX, and 0xDEAD managed to prove Intel wrong by getting a Coffee Lake chip to run on both 200-series and even 100-series boards.

 

By adding the Coffee Lake CPU’s microcode, the iGPU's UEFI GOP driver, and some Management Engine bootstraps on the side of the motherboard BIOS, the modders had an 8th-gen chip running stable on the older platforms.

 

While this is an incredibly impressive feat, it's worth noting that the team was using a four core/four thread i3-8100 chip in its tests, rather than any of the six-core models. In the accompanying guide, they recommend not using the mod with i5 and i7 K-series CPUs because of the higher power limits, but it might still work with the non-K versions of these chips.

 

Back in December, a Chinese user got his Core i3-8350K processor to work on a Z170 motherboard, though it did cause a few issues.

Remeber to check out the Win-Raid forum, which contains guides, patches, and the initial think tank thread. Just make sure you know what you’re doing and understand the risks involved if you decide to try it.

Edited by SceptreCore

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Socket_575px.png

 

That's a lot of I/O with an extra 542 pins than the previous socket. Intel wants to beat Epyc back down with a big stick. It's got nearly an extra 100 over Epyc's SP3. The increased TDP also gives away that these chips are going to cram in more of everything.

 

Will have to wait for 10nm desktop parts to see the direct power consumption benefits over 14nm++ Coffee Lake.

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https://segmentnext.com/2018/04/27/intel-whiskey-lake-cannon-lake/

 

The first quarter earnings call revealed that Intel is indeed shipping small quantities of Cannon Lake CPUs but the mass production and large-scale shipments will only be possible in 2019 due to production problems. This means that we will be getting 14nm based CPU this year as well and they will be called Intel Whiskey Lake.

 

Whiskey lake which will be a small refinement of coffee lake, or what I'm calling... Irish Coffee Lake.

 

Ice lake should also presumably be delayed.

 

That means AMD has almost caught up. But Intel looks to be planning something huge with recruiting lots of talent including the former AMD employees. Interesting times to be an enthusiast

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https://www.techradar.com/news/intel-core-i7-8086k-anniversary-edition-processor-coming-on-june-8th

 

Just a few days ago, the rumored Intel Core i7-8086K Anniversary Edition processor’s specs were laid bare by retail leaks, and now we know when the chip will debut.

 

Ironically, in a post defaming retail leaks about the supposed special edition chip, Overclocker’s Gibbo let loose that the Intel Core i7-8086K Anniversary Edition will be announced and up for preorder on June 8th. What’s more, Gibbo details that the chip will retail for under £400 (about $530, AU$705), which is a far lower price than the one that leaked earlier this week.

 

According to the latest rumors, the Core i7-8086K will be the Intel’s fastest 6-core consumer processor yet. Although, it features similar specs to the company’s current flagship Core i7-8700K including 6 cores, 12 threads and 12 MB of L3 cache, the new chip is said to be 300MHz faster overall.

 

This increase in frequency would put its base clock speed at 4GHz with a 5GHz boost clock – and that’s just the speed of this supposed chip straight out of the box without factoring in overclocking potential.

It’s almost a given that we’ll see the Intel Core i7-8086K Anniversary Edition processor announced at Computex 2018, but we’ll hold our enthusiasm for it until it’s actually real.

 

rumoured to also just have TIM instead of being soldered


VGBZRjR8TcQwrnyfB5TGi4-650-80.png

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Hearing about 5ghz on 6 cores out of the box is just crazy... delid and go to town!

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Hearing about 5ghz on 6 cores out of the box is just crazy... delid and go to town!

Delid will be a necessity!

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Hearing about 5ghz on 6 cores out of the box is just crazy... delid and go to town!

Delid will be a necessity!

 

 

I wonder if these cherry picked cpu's run 5ghz without delid or throttle cuz of temps/load? And still have head room for OC if delid? I want one... but I want a lot of things haha

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Hearing about 5ghz on 6 cores out of the box is just crazy... delid and go to town!

Delid will be a necessity!

 

 

I wonder if these cherry picked cpu's run 5ghz without delid or throttle cuz of temps/load? And still have head room for OC if delid? I want one... but I want a lot of things haha

 

I wouldn't say no if someone gave me one. I'm just wondering how much better it could possibly be than the 8700K? And in that case then Intel's been holding out.

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