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TheManFromPOST

My leg and the last 2 months

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I hate early mornings spent inside. some really dark thoughts seem to hover around in me. I need to go out my back door for a bit. it seems to chill my mind a bit

it's something about the air in the home first thing in the morning, after being fairly closed down over night. sure there is some ventilation, but not much is better than opening the door to fresh morning air

 

Edited by eveln
just to be clearer if possible

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1 hour ago, TheManFromPOST said:

running out of piggies

Fark.  That is NOT fun.

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45 minutes ago, TheManFromPOST said:

while it is sore, I can still walk

Yeah.  Maybe it's just the gruesome look, but I still don't think I'll be trading places with you next granted wish.

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Bloody Hell TMFP. Is this all the result of bad circulation due to Diabetes or did your leg issue contribute ? ... not that it matters so much in the grand scheme, but fuck it ... you be one tough cookie.

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that's very unfortunate tmfp

i hope you're weathering it all okay, but poor micro circulation + sugar (which is diabetes when it is problematic)  = ongoing potential for gangrene

 

 

wiser not to do too much mobilising while it heals

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On 11/16/2018 at 10:08 AM, TheManFromPOST said:

just got back from another couple of days in hospital

running out of piggies

ns8ZF54.jpg

That's a bummer TMFP, is it going to plateau and stop spreading anytime soon ?

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for the first time since May, I am without bandages. Woot. so easy now just to step into the shower ?

Went for a checkup with the plastic team at hospital last week, happy with the progress my leg has taken. but the swelling of the flap has not gone down
I have three options;
leave it, the swelling looks yuck, but does not impede my day at all
liposuction, seems it would take several sessions to get it right
more surgery, open it up, thin it out, sew back closed. this has the added advantage of reducing (but not eliminating) the graft scar.

Edited by TheManFromPOST
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personally, if it ain't broke don't fix it

 

diabetics are notorious for wound infections and complications; if your day job doesn't involve being a leg model, you need to accept the cosmesis is unappealing, but not being dead from unnecessary interference is a solid win

 

 

why would you circumcise a leg ?

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12 minutes ago, scruffy1 said:

personally, if it ain't broke don't fix it

 

diabetics are notorious for wound infections and complications; if your day job doesn't involve being a leg model, you need to accept the cosmesis is unappealing, but not being dead from unnecessary interference is a solid win

 

 

why would you circumcise a leg ?

i think it is planning a terrorist attack

but yes, I agree. it is only cosmetic.
and right now I have had enough of hospitals and surgery. I think I have been put under 12 times in 15 months

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1 hour ago, TheManFromPOST said:

for the first time since May, I am without bandages. Woot. so easy now just to step into the shower ?

Went for a checkup with the plastic team at hospital last week, happy with the progress my leg has taken. but the swelling of the flap has not gone down
I have three options;
leave it, the swelling looks yuck, but does not impede my day at all
liposuction, seems it would take several sessions to get it right
more surgery, open it up, thin it out, sew back closed. this has the added advantage of reducing (but not eliminating) the graft scar.

?

To shower / bathe unimpeded !! Yay ! Sheer bliss for you.

So glad to be reading this news from you TMFP.

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Holy shit. Oogla.

 

My ex next door neighbour lost his leg below the knee from necrotising fasciitis. It's an insidious infection. 

How many toes have you lost?

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1 hour ago, SacrificialNewt said:

Holy shit. Oogla.

 

My ex next door neighbour lost his leg below the knee from necrotising fasciitis. It's an insidious infection. 

How many toes have you lost?

i am loosing toes due to diabeties, not Necrotizing Facitis

lost a big toe of one foot bsck in May, i have lost 4 toes of the other foot later. looks gross, while i cannot piviot on my foot (i do a weird 3 point turn) I walk fine

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1 hour ago, TheManFromPOST said:

i am loosing toes due to diabeties, not Necrotizing Facitis

lost a big toe of one foot bsck in May, i have lost 4 toes of the other foot later. looks gross, while i cannot piviot on my foot (i do a weird 3 point turn) I walk fine

Ahhh yeah. Gotcha. I to and fro between being pre-diabetic. I know the possible outcomes of blindness and losing digits, but it's so hard to do the right thing, eat well and exercise. I'm guessing it's doubly hard when your mobility has been compromised like yours must have.

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i'm quite aggressive at treating "pre-diabetes" in those with no response (or enthusiasm) for healthier living

 

metformin is excellent for reducing insulin resistance, and is becoming a more recognised option as  pre-emptive therapy

 

tmfp is sadly a bit beyond that simple management

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7 minutes ago, scruffy1 said:

i'm quite aggressive at treating "pre-diabetes" in those with no response (or enthusiasm) for healthier living

 

metformin is excellent for reducing insulin resistance, and is becoming a more recognised option as  pre-emptive therapy

 

tmfp is sadly a bit beyond that simple management

I've heard a lot about Metformin, particularly that Australia is the country where it is most commonly prescribed. Not everyone advocates for it. 

 

My mother is now insulin dependent and started with Metformin. She even had a gastric sleeve operation, but her diet and exercise regime is as bad as ever and she gained the weight back fairly quickly. 

I can see myself becoming my mother, and I don't want that to happen - but it seems I don't hate the idea enough.

 

/hijacking TMFPs post. Sorry!

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21 minutes ago, SacrificialNewt said:

 

I can see myself becoming my mother, and I don't want that to happen - but it seems I don't hate the idea enough.

@SacrificialNewt ,are you a smoker? the effects of diabeties is worse if you are a smoker

 

i can take a picture of my feet if that will motivate you ?

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5 hours ago, TheManFromPOST said:

@SacrificialNewt ,are you a smoker? the effects of diabeties is worse if you are a smoker

 

i can take a picture of my feet if that will motivate you ?

I'm an ex-smoker. I was a heavy smoker for about 17 years. 

 

I'm not so sure about the photos...but if you want to show, I'll look ?

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My wife has been on Metformin a couple of times and it has been really useful for insulin resistance with no real side effects. 

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metformin is becoming a common early pharmacological intervention; my well informed peers have been talking up the benefits since well over a decade ago

sure, the 5:2 diet achieves a similar effect for those who will attempt it, but if your sugars are telling you it's looking like trouble ahead, metformin is a great option

 

 

my simple explanation is that the cells respond less and less to constant circulating insulin, a situation that would be rare when humans weren't overwhelmed with calories constantly

so fasting helps vary the level of insulin, giving the cells a chance to "notice" the levels - a bit like constant noise or odours become "background", insulin signal is similarly filtered out

 

meantime, the pancreas goes into overdrive to supply higher levels to provoke effect (the consequence of "insulin resistance" by cells), and this hold the sugar level down somewhat *until* the pancreas goes "ah fuck it! i'm overworked" and fatigues, at which point insulin drops, and the unfettered sugar level goes for the sky

 

at that point, old school management says "oh, you're diabetic... who'da thunk it ?" and starts metformin, rather too late for best effect (which would be to consider aiding the pancreas before it is clapped out)

 

it's relatively simple to do a glucose tolerance test and insulin levels to see where the patient with consistently rising "still normal, but less so every time"  sits in the scheme, both as a scientific measure, and a tool to frighten people into recognising a disaster in evolution - this stuff doesn't happen overnight for type 2 diabetics, it takes years, where there's a good prospect of reversing the trend

 

my analogy is that if you are on a dirt road heading for the cliff, the stop sign should be far enough back to allow you to apply the brakes before you hit the precipice - putting it on the edge (or at the bottom of the drop) is never going to end well

 

even worse, once your insulin secreting ability is "lost" from fatigue, the standard treatment is (to bathe your non-responsive cells with even more) insulin, which promotes weight gain  for the benefit of having "acceptable" blood sugars as you process sugar to fat as a consequence

getting in early is the best approach - eat less carbs, exercise, intermittent fasting, and choose better parents next time - genetics is a bitch  ?

 

 

Edited by scruffy1
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@SacrificialNewt you need a doctor to give you the evil eye and tell you you will be dead quicksmart ... about fifteen years ago my mum had such a doctor ... she took major umbrage and walked out on him apparently. Like how dare he
speak to her so rudely etc.etc., and he was sooo young too ! Showed no respect for a woman of her years blah blah blah ... Next time I saw her ( we don't gather much ) she has done as she's been told and is still here to boot.

I like doctors like that. It's how I/we managed to still be here too

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