Jump to content
TheManFromPOST

My leg and the last 2 months

Recommended Posts

24 minutes ago, eveln said:

I like doctors like that.

My first oncologist was about that blunt with patients.  He was even more blunt (loudly) with hospital staff who didn't do exactly what he told them to, as well.

Funnily enough, not many people liked him. ?  I got on really well with him.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

oncologists don't usually have the luxury of leisurely time to encourage action - it's not their time they are wasting if patients aren't up for a dose of reality

 

it is however most important they treat the patient rather than just the cancer

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, scruffy1 said:

oncologists don't usually have the luxury of leisurely time to encourage action - it's not their time they are wasting if patients aren't up for a dose of reality

 

it is however most important they treat the patient rather than just the cancer

Not sure about that last line.  
My mother would have hated to have some doctor to pander to her when she was battling (and lost to) cancer.  
She didn't want fluffy and sunshines and rainbows.  She wanted a hard arse bastard that hated cancer as much as her.  
She wanted someone to treat the cancer.  Not her.  

I'd feel the same way.  

AD

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I actually partook in a three year global study through Sydney Uni. I had to have a pre-diabetic reading but not be medicated for it. I made it in. I successfully finished the 8 week shake diet, lost 25kg, but then easter hit and my children started to give me the mini Lindt eggs they didn't like. I had been told that three consecutive days of having a sugary treat and I'd start craving sugar again. They were right. My mojo left me and I've put 20 of those kilos back on. At my lightest during that time, I had normal blood sugar and was in good health. 

Yeah - maybe I need a good kick up the butt...but I need it on a daily basis. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, SacrificialNewt said:

I actually partook in a three year global study through Sydney Uni. I had to have a pre-diabetic reading but not be medicated for it. I made it in. I successfully finished the 8 week shake diet, lost 25kg, but then easter hit and my children started to give me the mini Lindt eggs they didn't like. I had been told that three consecutive days of having a sugary treat and I'd start craving sugar again. They were right. My mojo left me and I've put 20 of those kilos back on. At my lightest during that time, I had normal blood sugar and was in good health. 

Yeah - maybe I need a good kick up the butt...but I need it on a daily basis. 

Yeah, I finally figured out about 3 years ago that I was just terrible with sugar and while my metabolism was letting me get away with far more than I should on the outside, I wasn't going great. So I just plain gave up anything with more than 5% refined sugar in it and anything sweet that wasn't fruit. (I'd already given up meat except for dinner too). I haven't looked back. Every time I'm tempted I remember how hard it was to give up in the first place and how hard it will be to get back to that stage.

1 hour ago, AccessDenied said:

Not sure about that last line.  
My mother would have hated to have some doctor to pander to her when she was battling (and lost to) cancer.  
She didn't want fluffy and sunshines and rainbows.  She wanted a hard arse bastard that hated cancer as much as her.  
She wanted someone to treat the cancer.  Not her.  

I'd feel the same way.  

AD

I think that is part of treating the patient. You don't necessarily treat 2 diseases the same way in the same way you don't treat 2 patients the same way. If one needs blunt then give it to them blunt.

 

Also, as far as diet goes vs metformin, You can achieve the same thing with diet to a degree but you are so up against it, especially when you have kids in the house.  A normal healthy diet for everyone else makes you put on weight. You have to eat like a saint and I imagine that is too much for a lot of people when the Metformin does help level the playing field so to speak.

Edited by fliptopia
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, SacrificialNewt said:

and I'd start craving sugar again

tell me about it ! ... no please don't ;) ... gone are the days I could polish off a pack of tim tams . At a job I once held I would go to the reception fridge daily and take out a Kit Kat. Without fail each and every shift I was on, for about three years.

I left that job and the KKs. The other day low on fuel, and not at a place to get my dinner I bought a KK to tide me over. Man what a disgusting mistake that was. It just tasted soooo sweet. No taste of the chocolate or wafer. nada
For me, trying old favourites seems to pull my mind back from the cravings ... there truly is no going back :)

I still like my weekend scotch and ice. and the odd piece of dark choccy, so no one's perfect

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, scruffy1 said:

it is however most important they treat the patient rather than just the cancer

I do bow to your knowledge of patient care .

How ever, wrt mine own, she was/is of an age where first response is to disagree with feeling ... then consider later . Maybe this Doc. knew that about her and thought given her issues he'd get in quick and push the process along in a timely fashion .

Anyway that's it for my derail .

<<< back to the thread

Edited by eveln

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i dont consider this to be hijacked

i posted my experience in the hope that nobody would go through what i have been through

that we are now talking about our own health is good

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, fliptopia said:

(I'd already given up meat except for dinner too).

This line confuses me.  When else would you regularly eat meat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

?

I scarcely touch sugar but it could easily have gone the other way.

Growing up I lived for a time with my grandparents who automatically put sugar in tea, including mine.

Not because of diabetes but tooth decay I consciously weaned myself off it and ever since hardly ever touch the stuff, or any processed foods, all of which seem to include sugar - presumably to addict the consumer.

I add a bit in my own cooking sometimes, but last I looked a 2kg bag was coming up to needing to be replaced after four years and near all of it had gone in visitors teas and coffees.

Once free of it in hot drinks, and never having much liked soft drinks, rarely eat cereal and if I do never add sugar, hardly ever touch chocolate unless mother is around, she's a chocoholic or a once in a blue moon frozen Mars Bar I'm just not interested in sweetness, much prefer savory but not heavy salt either.

I probably get more sugar from beer than anything else - have to have a few vices ?

One of my brothers was diagnosed type two year before last but seems to be managing it well, somewhere in the 5 vicinity whatever that means.

Mind you he has a far sweeter tooth, creme brule for breakfast anyone ? Not unusual with him, and he sure likes his wine. So do I but not anywhere close to him, or me a decade or so ago.

Not giving up meat though, typically my once a day main meal, my mother keeps on about three meals a day, not the way I eat, refuse to be a slave to food, one good meal a day works fine for me.

Half my family is currently vegetarian, and having to take supplements because of that - seems a bit stupid to me, humans are carnivores.

Cheers

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my comment on treating the patient was formed watching some oncologists go hell bent to "kill a cancer" where the odds were so lousy, and the outcome was frequently a more rapid death due to complications, after an appalling quality of life due to side effects of treatment

 

the best oncologists imho have the guts to tell a patient that it is not appropriate to continue the fight, whilst being clever enough to explain that that doesn't mean they will die any sooner, just that their remaining time will be spent living in the best comfort available, and enjoying it as best they can, as opposed to being persistently sick from radical intervention, and wasting the same amount of time being made ill due to their forlorn fantasy that they are not incurable

 

the weeks wasted in hospital where nothing is gained as you feel lousy and miss the chance to be safely around other people and experience the world is a crap trade off

 

the truth is that aggressive end stage intervention for some situations is because people "want something to fix them", when their real issue is total denial that there is no miracle that can be delivered - and some oncologists are more comfortable selling a "possible remission" (of incredibly small likelihood) rather than delivering the bad news, and let the patient die trying (at great expense and usually discomfort)

it's like adult children of ancient parents demanding their terminally ill loved one be admitted to intensive care, where they almost invariably die whilst blocking a bed for much more salvageable medical cases, or even worse, survive briefly longer and get to die again - the kids feel vindicated tat they can't let mum or dad "go", but often the very sick elderly are quite ready to depart

 

it's fucking hard being old and very sick; god bless advance care directives, even though offspring with guardianship will still deny their parent's wishes as the crunch

 

 

no-one in their right mind generally wants to die, except in extremely impossible to endure situations; the harsh truth is they all will, and demanding it not happen is rather understandable, but impossible to deliver

 

so no sunshine and rainbows, but +1 to a beautiful sunset and the big sleep

the idea that people "battle" and "lose" to cancer, or "survive" is like the person assessing the situation is far too used to sporting events as a model, rather than the messy actuality of part of your tissues going megalomaniac, with no intention to do you harm, just the unambiguous task of getting bigger and spreading their domain

 

my last comment here is a multi verse haiku i wrote during my treatment for lymphoma (stage 4... ooh !  any other type of malignancy and that's pretty much game over, as it were, but management of many things is way cleverer than early days of chemo)

 

my experience ?
cancer is not a battle
it's misunderstood
 
part of your being
believes itself immortal
but it's delusion
 
lacking self control
and going exponential
it seals its own fate
 
the metastasis
of first world aspirations
is a metaphor
  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm,

My mother is most definitely in the denial stage at 87 but at least hates hospitals and vigorously resists being admitted.

Her latest medication is Imbruvica to treat her chronic lymphatic leukemia. It will not cure the affliction but she thinks it will. Even the drug developers make no such claims. At least it does make her feel somewhat better, unlike the course of chemo she had, but the initial side effects were not pleasant. At $200,000 per year thank God it is on PBS but it is but one of a rattlebox of meds she takes daily, let alone a monthly plasma derived treatment and eye injections to slow her macro degeneration.

Her body is plain and simply wearing out if not worn out but she still maintains she is going to improve and get back on her gopher, which she has ridden four times total, get back to cooking, she hasn't cooked in a decade, re-start her cross-stitch, she can barely see the text on a large screen TV at 2 metres.

The latest is the Blind Society are putting in brighter lights and giving her stronger magnifiers. The difference will likely be minor and temporary but more money is being poured into an incurable mix of afflictions.

All about denial and if she doesn't like one medical opinion she looks for another.

It's incredibly tiring to live with a person who professes she wants to remain independent but overlooks the fact she is on a Level Four support package of carers most every day and currently I'm here 24/7 and my sister spends a huge amount of time running most of her finances, her shopping etc. It's what children will do to care for any parent but she is totally ungrateful apart from lip service and frankly just a clinically depressed bitch who revels in other people's misery and the death of others but no acceptance of her own approaching mortality.

It's just as well my sister and I are not suicidal is all I can say...

Cheers

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

2 hours ago, Cybes said:

This line confuses me.  When else would you regularly eat meat?

Lunch with ham or chicken. Any number of fast food restaurants serve mainly meat based  burgers etc. Bacon for breakfast. The list goes on. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, chrisg said:

 

Half my family is currently vegetarian, and having to take supplements because of that - seems a bit stupid to me, humans are carnivores.

 

A vegetarian shouldn't need supplements. Vegan is much harder to achieve properly without supplements. Also humans aren't carnivores. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, fliptopia said:

A vegetarian shouldn't need supplements. Vegan is much harder to achieve properly without supplements. Also humans aren't carnivores. 

?

Ok, omnivores ?

I sometimes wonder with my family, I think what they are is vegan but they keep correcting me, it's mostly my sister and her kids, three of the four anyway, her husband, great mate of mine, pays lip service to the lifestyle.

Ah well, their choice.

Cheers

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, fliptopia said:

Lunch with ham or chicken. Any number of fast food restaurants serve mainly meat based  burgers etc.

I had not thought about purchased lunches.  Not that I don't eat them but that I normally get some sort of salad sandwich when I do - I know how prevalent meat dishes are, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Cybes said:

I had not thought about purchased lunches.  Not that I don't eat them but that I normally get some sort of salad sandwich when I do - I know how prevalent meat dishes are, though.

Being on the road all day and nearly always short on time, fast food places were a little too tempting ? and I suck at moderation. All or nothing for me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My regular lunch is beef and veg stew, which I make a bulk slow cooker full of each week. I also do take away lunches when I have my kids with me. They hate my stew ?

  • Sad 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Kids tastes rarely seem to agree with my own. Or at least they can't both like the same things. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, chrisg said:

Not because of diabetes but tooth decay I consciously weaned myself off it and ever since hardly ever touch the stuff, or any processed foods, all of which seem to include sugar - presumably to addict the consumer.

 

Half my family is currently vegetarian, and having to take supplements because of that - seems a bit stupid to me, humans are carnivores.

Sugar's used for a lot of reasons: it's a preservative, it has mechanical effects depending on what's being done with it, but mostly because, like salt, people get used to a certain amount in their food and complain if it's not there.  Kind of like alcohol, I guess?

I don't really need supplements, but I also don't need medication daily to get by, so horses for courses, I guess.  Maybe you're not eating enough desserts for breakfast.

 

5 minutes ago, fliptopia said:

Kids tastes rarely seem to agree with my own. Or at least they can't both like the same things. 

Kids mostly still think that if they don't like something, that means they don't have to eat it.

 

Any word on what's happening with the shop, @TheManFromPOST?  I'd still like to come up one weekend and visit, and I'd hate to think I missed my chance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Nich... said:

 

Any word on what's happening with the shop, @TheManFromPOST?  I'd still like to come up one weekend and visit, and I'd hate to think I missed my chance.

Open again
last year I was inconsistant with regular stays in hospital and subsequent home rest, but now I seem to have stabilized, I should be more predictable this year

but I did need to cut down my 80 hour week (think I found the real problem ? ), so only open 5 days a week now

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, TheManFromPOST said:

but I did need to cut down my 80 hour week (think I found the real problem ? ), so only open 5 days a week now

That sounds sane. Steady as she goes TMFP. Also, enjoy your downtime now too.

 

9 hours ago, Nich... said:

... like salt, people get used to a certain amount in their food and complain if it's not there.  Kind of like alcohol, I guess?

Sugar in the grog, so maybe that's where chrisg makes up the shortfall ;)

We don't put alcohol in our cooking at all, just drink it straight on our weekends.

desserts for us consist these days of strawberries or the like cut up with a flavoured yoghurt  ... maybe some grated dark choc on top maybe not. Pretty damn basic, but still getting the sugar dose . << not an every day thing either ... gotta watch it these days :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

?

Not me Nich, apart from a bout of pneumonia last year I've been and remain healthy and have for years.

I cycle on and off any vitamin supplements, currently off, will go back onto a reduced regular intake come autumn but a very recent blood test said all fine.

Don't do desserts much, apples and bananas if I bother but do have a few of each as snacks most weeks.

Cheers

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, chrisg said:

?

Not me Nich, apart from a bout of pneumonia last year I've been and remain healthy and have for years.

Ah ok, I thought it had been touch and go for a while.  Glad it's getting better!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

?

Well, pneumonia is no joke, but no, I was never in any danger, was on an antibiotic drip for a couple of weeks though - slowly getting full mobility back, bit of a curate's egg of medical conditions to catch up on decades of good health I guess but well on the mend.

Cheers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×