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neubejiita

Gaming community in 2018 versus 1996?

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How does the gaming community in 2018 compare to the old days of LAN parties and dial-up Internet? We have Steam and fast connections at home, I do not even need a game store, I have Steam shop and reviews to go by, So I am not meeting up with other gamers at all, unless in an online game. That is how it seems to work these days, But how has this affected gaming overall?

 

Is this a good evolution of the gaming scene? It seems in many games that players are only for themselves and do not care about others, even ignoring team mates and blowing everything up without warning people nearby.

 

Will we ever see such a massive online cooperative battle like this again?

 

https://www.kotaku.com.au/2016/08/the-surprising-and-allegedly-impossible-death-of-everquests-unkillable-dragon/

 

This was an epic battle against a monster believed to be invincible. And all players cooperated together to kill him.

 

Modern games have heroes locked behind paywalls, that is really lame.

 

https://www.reddit.com/r/StarWarsBattlefront/comments/7cff0b/seriously_i_paid_80_to_have_vader_locked/dppum98/

 

No wonder that they are roasted.

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Not that I was big into LANs or even online play but - the gaming industry much like the home IT sector as a whole has gone downhill in that there's virtually no free stuff and everything's revolving around microtransactions.

And they've taken away the ability to do mods in a big way, obviously tied to the microtransaction thing.

 

Pretty pathetic that you can get a game then be expected to either play endlessly or pay along the way to get upgrades or access to new areas, characters, game modes or whatever.

 

Then throw in portable and consoles and it thins out the market somewhat. Though of course the gaming population is probably way bigger than 20 years ago.

 

But these days, really - it's like there might be a game that gets raved about for a couple of months then fades away.

Not like back then when you'd have the likes of Half Life, Counterstrike, the Quakes etc that'd be at the forefront for years.

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It depends on WHAT gaming scene you're in.

LAN parties haven't stopped, you just only have 'the one big one' in your city, and any that you and your friends hold.

 

I'm personally neck deep in the Arcade gaming scene, and the Retro gaming scene.

 

There's a group here in Brisbane who hold Commodore64 parties regularly.

The Arcade gamers scene is pretty good, everyone knows each other, and even if you don't, it's a fun and social time (I mainly play rhythm games or car games, with the occasional fighter)

 

Also there's currently over-saturation in gaming or the PC, the fact that a service like TWITCH even EXISTS is proof enough. There was always ways to stream games, and blipTV\Youtube were around first, but there actually a dedicated service now?!

 

Problem with MOST things in life right now is over-saturation.

Games move too quickly, no one dedicates.

Ditto movies.

Ditto social networking.

 

People move on so quickly they don't form long lasting bonds, not even in things that they enjoy!

 

Thats the upside of the scenes I enjoy hanging in.

Retro gaming is slow moving.

Arcade Games last 5's if not 10's of years.

 

And my other hobby is FPV Drone Racing, which leaps technology VERY quickly, but the old stuff still works fine, so its your choice how fast that stuff moves :)

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But these days, really - it's like there might be a game that gets raved about for a couple of months then fades away.

Not like back then when you'd have the likes of Half Life, Counterstrike, the Quakes etc that'd be at the forefront for years.

Mostly, I agree - but that sentiment is largely an illusion. There's 100 times as much stuff to get through, but there is gold out there, the same as there always was. eg: Fallout 2 and 3 are still played and you occasionally see screenshots on /r/games even today. Same goes for Skyrim, which is 6 or 7 years old now. Newer, Rocket League is still thriving.

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Though I really like arcade games, and talking more about golden era from around 1979 to 1989 in general they tend to lack depth and the replay value can fade. Though I suppose if you have a few hundred available that becomes less of a problem.

 

Personal preference by far though with a physical gathering would be pinball but in that case they'd have to be real and it's sort of hard to cater for lots of people by having dozens of machines if it's a temporary venue.

Edited by Rybags

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and the Retro gaming scene

I didn't know this!

 

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CrGOSlSVIAAqY1x.jpg

 

 

Although the console shelf is currently packed away to make room for my Twitch project. I'm going to stream retro games from real hardware (console and PC!), and coach new-school gamers through the classics.

 

I have a bunch of stuff that's not pictured too, a Virtual Boy, bunch of 8-bit home computers (Trash-80 CoCo2, C64, MSX2+, Atari XE (actually an XEGS with a homebrew keyboard)), and various portables).

Edited by SquallStrife

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and the Retro gaming scene

I didn't know this!

 

I thought you did!

Most of my retro love comes out in Emulation, purely because of space and the sometimes exorbitant cost of retro gear.

 

I have a very very large megadrive collection, and something that every collector seems to wish they had; a Watara Supervision.

 

Otherwise the Commodore 16 i'm trying to repair from the famous BREAK! screen, and recently, becaus eits slowly become 'retro' im enjoying showing younger friends into the N64 era.

In fact I'm about to order an Odroid XU4S for this exact reason ;)

 

The person for us to both envy is a very good mate named Peter, goes by Gurt online, and has a literal floor to roof room dedicated to every retro gaming thing you can imagine.

He was always into retro, but when something bad happened in life, he decided to focus on something he loved.

He literally has collections of every console that he can describe as "Well, every game released in Australia at least"; and thats before we unpack the Arcade Boards to install into a cabinet.

 

I also notice your BMO poster :P

 

You can keep being coy, but when that time comes that we cross paths it's gonna be fun. Much retro, very games.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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No doubt. :)

 

I have a very very large megadrive collection, and something that every collector seems to wish they had; a Watara Supervision.

My "every collector seems to wish they had" is this guy:

 

mwGrwME.jpg

lR29iHV.jpg

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Commodore 16? Have you done the internal 64K mod? I have the required DRams (I didn't need the mod, have a Plus 4)

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I've never even seen anything like that!

That's neat!

The Sega Teradrive, a joint project between IBM and Sega. It's very cool, and lusted after in places like ASSEMbler.

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Commodore 16? Have you done the internal 64K mod? I have the required DRams (I didn't need the mod, have a Plus 4)

 

Not yet, I can't actually locate what is stopping it from booting yet.

It instantly loads to the Rainbow BREAK screen.

And while in Commodore 64 days, this meant a limited number of possible errors, in C16's this means literally ANYTHING is wrong.

From a SINGLE stuck key, to a damaged part, to a voltage mismatch (not that its monitoring, just, you know, not fully initializing a dram module or some such).

 

No idea what I'll do with it when I'm done.

 

I've never even seen anything like that!

That's neat!

The Sega Teradrive, a joint project between IBM and Sega. It's very cool, and lusted after in places like ASSEMbler.

 

 

As a Sega guy, never much liking Nintendo until MUCH later years, this excites me.

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:)

 

Mine is special, I added a second ISA slot to accommodate an XT-IDE adaptor, so I can use a CF card as mass storage.

 

The factory ISA slot is used up by a Sound Blaster of course! :P

 

nVzaYjY.jpg

Edited by SquallStrife
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Though I really like arcade games, and talking more about golden era from around 1979 to 1989 in general they tend to lack depth and the replay value can fade.

 

Well, thats where 'the scene' comes into its own.

The game itself is more like a time filler, and the social crowd is what keeps it interesting.

 

Look at 'sport' for example, I've kicked a ball before, and so has every soccer\AFL\grid iron player, so why is it entertaining?

Because there are people to verse. Friends to laugh and play with.

 

Out side of 'required training' there are very few minds in the world who would enjoy "playing a game of football" on their own.

:)

 

Mine is special, I added a second ISA slot to accommodate an XT-IDE adaptor, so I can use a CF card as mass storage.

 

The factory ISA slot is used up by a Sound Blaster of course! :P

 

nVzaYjY.jpg

 

See, its this sort of knowledge I crave.

I don't even understand how the hell you would go about learning that a piece of hardware could even support a whole extra card not physically on the board.

And when you add it, if it would address, what else it would affect. etc etc.

 

I mean, I'm sure I just need more electrical engineering hobby experience so I can read a schematic flawlessly and just 'know these things', but its so hard learning where to start.

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The reason they call it the PCI or ISA "bus" is because the slots are literally bussed together. (All the pin 1's are commoned together, all the pin 2's, etc.)

 

How do you think riser cards work? ;)

 

It's up to the individual cards to determine which instructions are destined for it, and when it's safe to drive the data bus. ISA did it by directly decoding the address bus pins A0 thru A19 or A31. PCI is a bit more sophisticated, the BIOS/EFI/OS can tell a card what memory range it should "listen" on, but it's the same in principle.

 

 

 

The way I learn all this stuff is by starting with a problem to solve, and going from there. I wanted a second ISA slot, so I started looking up info about ISA architecture, schematics of motherboards, etc etc. I've rarely (if ever) learned something new by starting with "I want to learn about XYZ."

Edited by SquallStrife

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Incidentally, I'm going to be using this awesome Sega PC when I do early DOS games on my Twitch stream!

 

Just going through the process now of setting up lighting and mics.

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