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eveln

" Only birds and fools fly "

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The title is a quote from a 95 year old ex aviation engineer after having retrieved or repaired about 480 crashed planes across Australia.
He reckons that about 98% of the crashes were pilot error.

Here's another quote from the article cited  as being said by the guy ...

" "There's nothing wrong with aeroplanes. They're as safe as the pilot." "

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-11-17/man-who-worked-75-years-as-an-aircraft-engineer-turns-95/10501728

It's a good and interesting read.

Edited by eveln
crappy link fixed

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🙂

Link not working for me Ev, but I'm not at home and on a pretty crappy connection, could be this end.

I can sort of guess what it says though and it is not as simple as that, as this admittedly older IATA report points out:

https://www.boeing.com/commercial/aeromagazine/articles/qtr_2_07/article_03_2.html

First, it is far more accurate to say "human error" than "pilot error" the flying chain of responsibility includes not just pilots but mechanics and air traffic controllers as well and more of them are involved in a single flight.

Second, we have not had an airliner accident in Australia  in decades, incidents yes, corrected by usually highly competent pilots to lead to no fatalities.

What we do have are a disturbingly large number of Light Aviation or GA accidents, typically of aircraft flown by much less experienced pilots often with only VFR (Visual Flight Rules) ratings and often with relatively low flight hours logged. That is a concern to all pilots especially high-hour multi-rated pilots but it is somewhat unlikely to improve given the requirements that currently apply to obtain a PPL and the simple fact that GA activity is increasing year on year.

There is actually an article on the subject in the current Aero magazine following a conference that was at least partly involved with GA safety in Wagga Wagga in July - also worth a read 🙂

Cheers

 

 

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Sorry chrisg ... < note to self : check links work before leaving thread > ... 

It's about a bloke who spent his life retrieving and repairing planes chrisg. A personal history and a man's opinion based on his personal history. And now that @~thehung has posted a link you can open, you might find it interesting ... or not.

Also. many thanks @~thehung .

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7 hours ago, chrisg said:

First, it is far more accurate to say "human error" than "pilot error" the flying chain of responsibility includes not just pilots but mechanics and air traffic controllers as well and more of them are involved in a single flight.

One of Dad's and my mates (about 30 years ago though) was a crash investigator for Boeing.  He told us that at that time, almost all the investigations he'd been involved in were down to pilots, and most of those cases were communication fuckups - people mishearing or misunderstanding instructions.  Sure, there were mechanical failures, or even a fueler screwing up, but the usual culprit was something daft like Captain Frisbee hearing one thing and thinking another.  People get tired.

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Yeah Cybes although it has greatly improved, even more so if you consider the enormous increase in commercial aircraft movements over three  decades let alone what is projected over the next two decades, especially in Asia.

Theoretically pilots should not get THAT tired in commercial aviation but again it is not that simple. Pilots so more than JUST fly airliners but actual time in flight is restricted to 100 hours per month and that gets broken down into maximum duty times as well, not a lot of pilots actually hit the 100 hour mark in any event.

Even so even 30 years ago the number of fatal airliner accidents was vanishingly small compared to number of flights per year.

There is always room for improvement but I do wonder if we are not heading down some blind alleys in that regard, over reliance upon computers being one of them.

Military flying is not surprisingly more dangerous but escape systems are pretty damned good so with a few air force's obvious exceptions fatalities in peace-time are not massive.

Just how much better so-called professional flying safety can get is somewhat moot although the most dangerous job is still crop-dusting but GA does need some attention.

Cheers

 

 

 

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i love me some Air Crash Investigation(s).  even more so in instances where nobody had to die in order to uncover a preventable oversight.

you can usually skip roughly the first half which is the set up and dramatisation because the most pertinent moments of that are rehashed during the forensic breakdown.  some episodes are just so-so but theres some cracking good ones where the twisting trail of guesswork is akin to a good murder mystery.  the first major incident involving volcanic ash was really cool.

Edited by @~thehung

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14 hours ago, @~thehung said:

the first major incident involving volcanic ash was really cool.

Ye the Flight 9 one was good. My two other favourites are the Landing on the Hudson and the Gimli Glider ones.

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2 hours ago, aliali said:

Ye the Flight 9 one was good. My two other favourites are the Landing on the Hudson and the Gimli Glider ones.

🙂

All of which align with my comments on airline crews Ali, coming through when the chips came down.

I had a friend's dad who used to be a senior captain with El Al, his attitude was always so long as he looked after himself those sitting behind him were fine. He only ever had one real incident of note, a wheel fell off a -720 on take-off from Rome - scared hell out a cyclist apparently. He made a low gear down pass at Ben Gurion so the tower could check it out and he landed safely.

 

Cheers

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Relative used to work at BASI.  It's amazing how it only takes 1 person to cause so much trauma.  The guy that washes the plane and doesn't remove some tape from a sensor.  

A tired pilot.  

Misread instructions/information. 

Mis-entered information.  (I believe a recent one was a pilot that accidentally set their autopilot at 0 feet)

A cockup from ATC.  

Dave

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For sure AD, it only takes one little mistake or confluence of circumstance to lead to drama or worse.

In the end the pilots are at the tip of things, in more ways than one but it is pretty much impossible for their to check everything that others have done to the aircraft they sign off on especially with the rapid turn arounds demanded by the scherduling.

ATC is very variable around the world, here is pretty damned good, other places not so much. Most pilots will admit though, if pressed, that the most demanding job in the loop is ATC, responsibility for many aircraft, not just one.

Cheers

 

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