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chrisg

Some great reads

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We haven't had a "What are you reading?" thread in quite a while but I was given these for Christmas and whilst I'm reading the first, superb, a quick skim says the others are very good as well.

"A Gentleman in Moscow" Amor Towles

"Norse Mythology" Neil Gaiman

"The Fox" Frederick Forsyth

That's my main reading for a few weeks but I never seem to be reading just one book so am in the steady process of  browsing Blainey's revised edition of "A Very Short History of the World" and "Sapiens" is close to the top of the pile.

Never let it be said I'm slow to catch up but I'm also reading Card's "Ender's Game" on my Kindle in bed - don't have to put the bedroom light out that way ?

I read some early Card, don't recall what, it didn't grab me much but "Ender" is pretty damned good, will have to find the sequels apparently. I'm reading the revised edition that he updated from the '85 edition to allow for real-world political changes.

I don't often use my Kindle for light reading, just keep a bunch of reference books on it so they are easy to take to a job if needed, "Ender" had been on there for a while. I've given up carrying dead tree versions of books on flights recently, less weight, but had tossed the Kindle into my carry-on last trip and being I didn't have some pretty girl sitting next to me to chat to started reading it and my opinion of Card has changed, shall be looking for more of his stuff now.

Cheers

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I received Weaveworld by Clive Barker. I'm not far into it, but I'll tell you what I think when I've finished.

My last read was Dragon Tears by Dean Koontz. As with most Koontz, it hooks you in, it's full of pages of the protagonist's overthinking in between the good bits, and then the ending is pretty flat. Overall enjoyment - 3/5.

 

 

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That's why I gave up on Koontz years ago, way too formulaic.

Weaverworld is apparently very good though, gets a 4.5 on Goodreads for the overall trilogy.

Be interested to hear how you find it ?

Cheers

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11 minutes ago, chrisg said:

Weaverworld

No 'r' before the 'w'.  I'm only being pedantic about that one because I think the way you spelled it is actually another book by a different author.

 

Been quite a while since I read that one, but I did enjoy it.  Still in my bookshelf, come to think of it - I may give it a refresh.

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Dunno Cybes but will go look, it's just a title I noted on Goodreads to keep an eye out for.

Cheers

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To my own shame... I'm not a reader. It might just be my short attention span or my tendency for obsessive behaviour, but I find it so hard to get into a good book, besides 'the' good book that is.

A friend has leant me Eichmann in Jerusalem: A report on the banality of evil. But find Hannah Arendt's superior and germanic tone hard to move past. I'll stick with it though. few pages a week.... ? 

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8 hours ago, fliptopia said:

I’m about halfway through Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett. It has been quite entertaining so far.

Another one of my favs, had the paperback for years.

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Good idea, it's always time to reread Good Omens!

I got Hangman by Jack Heath for Christmas. It's his first book for adults. Usually he writes gripping action/adventure for pre-teens and teens. This, however, is Definitely Not Suitable For Kids. It's about a guy who helps out on cases for the FBI in Texas, and he's... a little odd. There's a really, really good reason why this story can only take place in Texas, and nowhere else in the English speaking world. It's so far out of my usual reading comfort zone (the only crime books I read usually are cosy mysteries - this is pretty full on) and I absolutely love it to bits. It's a really easy read, nothing too dense, never a dull moment, not too much deep introspection either. Reeeeaaaaaad iiiiiiiiiiiiit!!!!!!!1

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I rather tentatively put Hangman on my to read list at Goodreads Fenzy, not usually my kind of read but Bradley Denton, an author I do have a deal of time for, has been drifting into psycho killer novels himself and rated Hangman highly on some blog I was browsing so made note. If you are enjoying it I'll definitely give it a go.

By-the-by if anyone is interested in sort of alternate history cyberpunkish novels Denton's "Wrack and Roll" is well worth tracking down, recently re-read it. His "Blackburn" is not SF but more in the genre of Hangman by the sounds of it.

Cheers

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Chris, I got into Jack Heath because he is a Canberra boy, but I've kept reading because damn if the boy ain't seriously talented. We have some amazing local writers these days, serious talents who are starting to make a living out of their writing. I'm loving it.

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Just finished Robin by Dave Itzkoff, re-read Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari , Reading Larry Niven's Fleet of Worlds series and just finished re-reading The Long Earth series by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter.

Just started the Venus Prime series by Paul Preuss from original work by Arthur C. Clarke (modern retellings).

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That's a great mix mykl, might have to slip "Fleet of Worlds" onto the bottom of my pile for a re-read as well.

For some reason I have never really delved too deeply into Pratchett, my ex and one of my kids loves his stuff, shall have to give him another go - one day, the pile is high enough as it is ?

During the drama of back and forth from W.A. to S.A. and the subsequent move permanently to S.A. my sister, who is a just retired senior librarian, loaned me the Illuminae series:

http://amiekaufman.com/books/the-illuminae-files/illuminae/

Pretty wild ride told in a most unusual format, worth looking at.

Cheers

Cheers

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9 hours ago, mykl_c said:

The Long Earth series by Terry Pratchett and Stephen Baxter

1 hour ago, chrisg said:

shall have to give him another go

Fair warning, Chris: the Long Earth stuff may have significant input from Terry, but it comes across (to me at least) as far more of a Baxter tale than Pratchett.  If you're expecting Discworld, you're in for disappointment.

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Thanks Cybes, never really got into Discworld, Baxter is more my style anyway.

Dunno exactly why but sustained ludicrous humour in a nominally SF setting doesn't do much for me.

Going to be a while anyway, "the pattern is full Ghostrider" ?

Cheers

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Discworld is only full of ludicrous humor on the surface.  Underneath, it's actually full of biting social commentary (especially about English social politics, however most of it can be related to many countries worldwide) and human psychology.  It's also a commentary on many socio-political areas and cultural (and pop-culture) oddities and treasures.  Pratchett takes aim at everything from the Catholic Church, Hollywood, Rock music, Postal service, Banking/Finance, Railways, Asian Culture and Australia to War, Peace, Death and life itself.  He often highlights the absurdities of human beings and human society while showing all the good stuff too.

My favourite discworld is Feet of Clay where Pratchett asks "Who puts the words in your head".  That sat me back on my heels and made me really think.  I then went back and re-read many of the earlier books and realised just how deep they go.

My current reading is nowhere near as philosophical or deep. ?  I'm working my way through the Nate Temple series by Shayne Silvers (kinda reminds me of the Dresden Files meets James Bond).  I'm also studying ITSM related texts (Problem and Change mainly) for work.  Oh - and I have a copy of the whole Maze Runner series in real paper books sitting near my bed waiting for me.

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Probably Chaos, never went deep enough, one of my daughters loves the stuff - to each their own ?

Cheers

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4 hours ago, Chaos.Lady said:

He often highlights the absurdities of human beings and human society while showing all the good stuff too.

That he does, that he does. Apart from being generally entertaining it's one of the reasons I have read most of his books multiple times as I pick up on things I missed the first time round, but they are not for everyone.

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Yeah, I've found that as much as I enjoy each book, I generally can't just read one after the other. I think it's roughly the same reason chrisg doesn't get into them. 

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I really have to start the Discworld series. However, now that I have two Clive Barkers given to me by my eldest, I really have to finish those first. Small print in thick tomes  may take a while though.

 

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, Chaos.Lady said:

Maze Runner series 

Crikey !.  I have read the first two of this series. Mere unadulterated chance that I happened upon them too. I started the first as a time filler to keep me alert during quiet time ...

Well I found the read quite distracting and was sorry to only have the two available to me .

I'm more of a Follet freak. I love his sagas.

Edited by eveln

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2 hours ago, SacrificialNewt said:

Small print in thick tomes  may take a while though.

Barker flows pretty well, though - it doesn't take as long (per 1000 words) to get through as some other things.

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Recently read the Three-Body Problem trilogy by Cixin Liu. 

A bit slow to get going, but after the first hundred pages or so, impossible to put down. The folks saying this is a complete masterpiece aren't exaggerating. 

I was able to dig it up as epub files with a bit of searching. They're good quality, no OCR errors (unlike the digital version of Gödel, Escher, Bach which is completely unreadable, had to get the hard copy of that one). 

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GE&B is a book to savor in small bites I found Kimmo.

I became distracted courtesy of my kindle and being able to read it in bed without having to turn on or off a light.

Read "Life" the sort of autobio of Keith Richards, fascinating read especially if you lived through the emergence and stardom of the Stones.

Caught up on Fleet of Worlds, now into the (I Think) latest Haldeman, and still working through the pile in daylight - possibly I read too much ?

Cheers

 

 

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20 minutes ago, chrisg said:

GE&B is a book to savor in small bites I found Kimmo.

I was kind of thinking the opposite, not to put it down for too long, otherwise you might lose the thread of that eternal golden braid, but it's such heavy going I've had to give it a rest for a bit. 

Picked up my copy at the Escher/Nendo exhibition at the NGV, BTW. Worth checking out. 

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