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chrisg

Has editing died ?

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Is it just me or has the art of editing simply gone out the window in the past couple of years ?

 

The odd typo is understandable but it is becoming a total slog to get any intelligence out of the news online no matter from what source.

 

It's no t just spelling either, the grammar has become atrocious, with dangling participles and other grammatical errors galore.

 

Add that to spending a bit of time, more by accident than design, on Quora where many of the contributors seem to either not have English as their first language or worse come from the deep south of the U.S.  and write as they speak and I'm finding myself not infrequently finishing reading or attempting to read something and finding myself wondering if the person who wrote it was a lunatic or high on something.

 

I appreciate some sites probably including news.com.au almost certainly use AI editing but they might at least do some simple proofreading before publishing, it's becoming decidedly irritating.

 

Atomic, a few occasional departures from reality accepted, has mostly escaped the virus or whatever it is, long may it continue.

 

Cheers

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you may find joy in reading articles on aeon

 

they not only know how to spell, they appear to be sentient

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Posted (edited)

They don't care, they paid to put a quota of crap on the web site or TV. To hell if the grammar or spelling is worse than schoolkids. Sometimes the headline has nothing to do with actual content.

Edited by Jeruselem

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🙂

 

I'd not been on Aeon for a little while, I've been beyond distracted by life in general for a year and more but yes, thanks scruffy, I'll have to drop by for a soothing rational read.

 

It is very, very true J, and if you venture very far from the beaten track on line you can very easily run into the utterly unintelligible.

 

Cheers

 

 

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I seem to recall Stephen Fry saying " Phooey " to grammar or spelling or some such ... He may not actually have said " phooey " per say, but he was critical of the hindrance of language, um, evolution 😉

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Yep, the standard continues to fall, almost everywhere more or less. 

 

2 minutes ago, eveln said:

per say

 

Per se

  • Haha 1
  • Yes Sir! Very atomic! 1

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1 hour ago, chrisg said:

 

It's no t just spelling either, the grammar has become atrocious, with dangling participles and other grammatical errors galore.

 

Add that to spending a bit of time, more by accident than design, on Quora where many of the contributors seem to either not have English as their first language or worse come from the deep south of the U.S.  and write as they speak and I'm finding myself not infrequently finishing reading or attempting to read something and finding myself wondering if the person who wrote it was a lunatic or high on something.

 

 

no t should be not? 😛 Also your 4th paragraph could be broken up into a couple of sentences. 

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Probably victim to cost-cutting.  Newspapers are dead, just that nobody's gotten through to the fogies that still buy the stupid things.

 

Online news is a volatile product, as in once the new content rolls in the old stuff is like 3 day old prawns and nobody gives much of a shit about it.

 

At least on the positive side, the journo's haven't taken the path of just writing stories like a 12 year-old would compose a TXT message on the phone.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Kimmo said:

Yep, the standard continues to fall, almost everywhere more or less. 

 

 

Per se

so what you just ignore my reference to Stephen and his desire to loosen the  constrictions of language lore  ... typical pedant

Edited by eveln

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Sub-editing is something that has become harder to justify.  For a lot of places it's farmed out.  9/fairfax, IIRC, only just anounced they're looking at bringing it back in-house.

I assume you're talking about sub-editing and not actual editing.

 

I'm also confused why you're hanging out on Quora, a social media site, and then complaining that it's not filled with content using a traditional house style.  Also confused why you think here is not where a bunch of people type how they talk, and you yourself don't, too.

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Actually I word myself on here pretty much as I do in person, within certain speech-to-text constraints.

 

I don't actually spend much time on Quora at all although I'd not really think of it as a social media site more a grab bag of the mostly inane with just enough substance to....oh, I do get what you mean  🙂

 

The point in the end is communication, if the ability to communicate without confusion is lost then the Internet itself has little point or future.

 

I do accept the typo of no t Flip, not sure the paragraph could have been readily divided though.

 

I'm not sure it was Fry but someone probably has revisited the concept of devolution of language. That of itself does not bother me at all, English is dynamic but if structure fails such that the meaning is lost then the language fails.

 

Cheers

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1 hour ago, fliptopia said:

 

no t should be not? 😛 Also your 4th paragraph could be broken up into a couple of sentences. 

 

next you'll be promoting capitalisation and full stops

 

useful in a book maybe, but totally anachronistic when the page is a screen, and a healthy hit of the enter key offers far better representation of the pause between disparate thoughts than any mere dot can suggest

51 minutes ago, chrisg said:

I'm not sure it was Fry but someone probably has revisited the concept of devolution of language. That of itself does not bother me at all, English is dynamic but if structure fails such that the meaning is lost then the language fails.

 

 

i can manage to appreciate the evolution of english, but i detest americanisation because it's either ugly or just plain lazily inane (think about the advent of txt)

 

"new" words are often less elegant, and more "manglish"

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The older the journalist, the better the grammar and spelling.

Probably has more to do with the fact that the young ones use twitter as their only source. And that place is a sewer in all respects, including grammar.

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1 hour ago, scruffy1 said:

next you'll be promoting capitalisation and full stops

 

useful in a book maybe, but totally anachronistic when the page is a screen, and a healthy hit of the enter key offers far better representation of the pause between disparate thoughts than any mere dot can suggest

 

i can manage to appreciate the evolution of english, but i detest americanisation because it's either ugly or just plain lazily inane

 

😂

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, scruffy1 said:

...but i detest americanisation because it's either ugly or just plain lazily inane

 

how about ugly and laboriously inane?  as in the punctuation of this headline from The New Yorker: "Donald Trump, Jr.,’s Love for Russian Dirt"

 

one americanisation that shits me to tears is the habit of placing punctuation extraneous to an original quote inside the bounds of the quotation marks.  this is a perversion of the very idea of what a quote should be — an absolutely bloody verbatim testament! 

 

"Blib Blob Blab," she said, "is talking the world by storm."

 

now, i ask you, what is the full stop doing inside the quote?  why is the symbol for the end of a sentence, not at the end of the sentence?  aaarrrggghh!

 

and this habit is even more egregious in the age of computers.  because now, if i want to highlight that fucking bullshit to google search it, i end up searching for "Blib Blob Blab,"  <--- look at it!   just look at that gormless fucking freeloading comma FFS!

 

Edited by @~thehung
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Are you saying the comma or period is in the wrong place?

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8 hours ago, chrisg said:

 

I do accept the typo of no t Flip, not sure the paragraph could have been readily divided though.

 

 

You know I'm only being pedantic because you wrote a piece on editing 😉 but I found there could be a full stop between "speak" and "I'm". I'd call it debatable though. I know I've read plenty of my posts later and been alarmed at the sheer number of errors I've made so I'm hardly in a position to get too sanctimonious. 

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🙂

 

That would involve dropping the "and" which was rather deliberate to add emphasis 🙂 

 

I'm being pedantic as well, there is nothing whatsoever wrong with free flowing text so long as meaning is maintained but far too often it is lost or mangled to such a degree that you really have no idea what the message is.

 

I'm not sure scruffy, there is a theory that punctuation "translates" text into cadence but that goes right to the core of just how people actually read. Many years ago now I took a course on speed reading, useful for some generally boring reading tasks but takes all the flavor out of reading a good novel. Retention seems to also suffer.

 

I do agree though with Americanisms and in particular with the evolving if not highly evolved tendency to reduce everything to an acronym, frequently a contrivance  whose meaning is distanced from the reality.

 

I'm not even sure what that New Yorker's headline is meant to mean @th .

 

Cheers

 

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7 minutes ago, chrisg said:

 

I do agree though with Americanisms and in particular with the evolving if not highly evolved tendency to reduce everything to an acronym, frequently a contrivance  whose meaning is distanced from the reality.

 

 

Or the portmanteaus of every celebrity/celebrity relationship. 

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6 hours ago, Nich... said:

Are you saying the comma or period is in the wrong place?

 

a period is what women of childbearing capacity have with varying regularity

 

a full stop is an english punctuation mark

 

 

it's enough to make me want to "retch out" to you for a solution

 

 

i read an article about a woman who makes >$100k per year in the states, whose job involves naming items for marketing

 

one of the terms she used was to describe when things get too well known that they lose their brand cachet (think : xerox / nugget / white out) - it's called "genereification", which i actually thought it was a pretty reasonable neologism, so not all new words are completely pointless, regardless of the anglophone origin

 

i do however take notable exception to the adoption of a long list of 'mercan words courtesy of the tv / streaming / interweb being mainly their vernacular - notably cookies, elevators, zee, buddy, and many more

 

as for adopting their spelling... don't get me started

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5 hours ago, chrisg said:

🙂

 

That would involve dropping the "and" which was rather deliberate to add emphasis 🙂 

Was the emphasis on sounding breathless with the lack of commas, if not periods

 

4 hours ago, scruffy1 said:

cookies

Cookies and biscuits are distinct styles of the same thing, so it having its own word is, IMO, a good thing.

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11 hours ago, Nich... said:

Are you saying the comma or period is in the wrong place?

 

i may have confused the issue with an example that couldve been read as dialogue within fiction, wherein the conventions are less clear (to me).

 

how about this instead?  suppose i am writing a non-fiction article about my trip to the cafe.

 

US style:

The options on the menu were "rare," "medium rare," "medium," and "well done."  [commas and full stops in the wrong places!]

 

Proper-like:

The options on the menu were "rare", "medium rare", "medium", and "well done".


 

 

 

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In that list example, I agree, the commas and full stop are in awkward places.

 

For "Blib Blob Blab," she said, "is talking the world by storm." however, it's debatable.  I'm not sure I see a problem with the end of the sentence in the quote also being the end of the sentence. 


I just want to point out that I'm in a super minority, in still using long billions and gaol, but I also get the joy of communicating in both Commonwealth and American English.  Given how much news is aggregated globally, I'm fine with reading multiple versions and styles of English. 

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yeah, it looks perfectly fine to me for dialogue in fiction, and i suspect everyone does it that way now, if they didnt already.

 

if you use long billions, what do you call 10^9 ?

 

 

huh..."is talking the world by storm".  all this take of pedantry and i cant believe i only just noticed that.

 

 

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