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Master_Scythe

Give me a Language!

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So previously I was quite set on Java, because it was multiplatform.

I was warned it was 'hard' but I felt up to the challenge.... Turns out, with my broken eyeballs, reading that much of a 'how to' guide\tutorial is hard.

 

How about HTML5? It seems to be everything these days.

Android apps, Apple apps, webpages, even local EXE's can be made from it, it seems?

 

What i'm looking for is a language that makes sense, when you see it, from a noob perspective.

Also, one that isn't too upset by errors in coding (Python for example, is BAD, because my eyes can't reliably see where whitespace is, so excess spaces get missed OFTEN).

I played with Delphi in school, and that was AMAZING, I had a few apps finished in a single lesson (all of them were technically malicious [drive space burners, interrupts that never end on single core PC's, etc], I was a kid, but ho hum)

 

I dunno, I guess I'd like to learn to make things, and commit myself to an actual decent project, but I know with my vision, it needs to be fault tolerant, and easy to stumble through.

I saw that 10yo kid who made a virtual teacher!

https://www.9news.com.au/videos/coronavirus-childs-social-distancing-breakthrough/ck9i8r4kd005e0hl53rer1zqu

I mean, holy hell, it's been like..... 8 weeks at most? Thats rad... I want in....

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I have no idea how fault tolerant they are, but have you looked into Rust and Go?

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21 hours ago, Nich... said:

I have no idea how fault tolerant they are, but have you looked into Rust and Go?

 

I had not, RUST looks interesting.

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I'd suggest node.js

 

Rust tutorials are going to be denser than java tutorials, and go may not be much better.

 

Nodejs is in the same kind of area as python in terms of being very forgiving and doing it's best to just figure out what you meant, and it has a very strong package library. It also uses brackets rather than whitespace for managing scope, much like java. Normally I would consider that a downside, but if you're having problems with whitespace that's probably an asset.

 

However, there is also another possible solution to your whitespace problem if you do want to use python. You could use an IDE that colors whitespace, somewhat like this guy did accidentally: https://intellij-support.jetbrains.com/hc/en-us/community/posts/360007578499-Weird-yellow-color-in-spaces-

 

The Intellij IDEA ide does have a free community edition if you want to try to modify his accidental config.

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Posted (edited)
20 hours ago, Sir_Substance said:

I'd suggest node.js

 

Rust tutorials are going to be denser than java tutorials, and go may not be much better.

 

Nodejs is in the same kind of area as python in terms of being very forgiving and doing it's best to just figure out what you meant, and it has a very strong package library. It also uses brackets rather than whitespace for managing scope, much like java. Normally I would consider that a downside, but if you're having problems with whitespace that's probably an asset.

 

However, there is also another possible solution to your whitespace problem if you do want to use python. You could use an IDE that colors whitespace, somewhat like this guy did accidentally: https://intellij-support.jetbrains.com/hc/en-us/community/posts/360007578499-Weird-yellow-color-in-spaces-

 

The Intellij IDEA ide does have a free community edition if you want to try to modify his accidental config.

 

I shall have a look at both 🙂

Can Node.JS be used for the usual.... things? Whats its most common application?

 

The HTML5 I was considering isn't worth considering? I can do HTML4 already.

Edited by Master_Scythe

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3 hours ago, Master_Scythe said:

 

I shall have a look at both 🙂

Can Node.JS be used for the usual.... things? Whats its most common application?

 

 The HTML5 I was considering isn't worth considering? I can do HTML4 already.

 

HTML5 isn't a programming language, it can't do generalized tasks. However, if you already know HTML5, node.js might have another advantage for you.

 

Node.js is basically server-side javascript. It was made with the goal of being able to write javascript+html in the browser and javascript on the server. Thus requiring only one programming language to make a website (along with html and css and the usual bucket of markup languages).

 

So, if you're wanting to make webapps, it's a strong choice because that's what it was made for. You can also use it to make webapps via electron, which you've almost certainly used in the form of slack or discord. Electron lets you take a node.js webapp, and package both webpage and server into one desktop distributable exe. Some people critique that technique for being resource heavy, but it does mean you can use the same skills you use to make webapps for desktop development as well.

 

The primary downside of node.js is that because it was designed based off of javascript, it uses a callback oriented program structure by default. That's a very different strategy from most imperative language, and it'll probably take a bit longer to really get used to, but it's perfectly valid.

 

As a secondary concern, there's a bit of a turf war between python and node.js, and as a python programmer I would say that I find node code messy and hard to read, and javascript as a language extremely inelegant due to it's very short design period back in the late 90's. However, your needs are somewhat specialized and thus I don't think my concerns there are very important.

 

For what it's worth, nodejs is also a very marketable skill. Javascript is #7 on the TIOBE index: https://www.tiobe.com/tiobe-index/

 

Go is 12, and Rust isn't in the top 20.

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I'll throw in support for C#

 

- The language is very structured and strongly typed, it's basically impossible to produce "true + true == 2" type bullshit (looking at you Javascript 😛), so it encourages good programming practice

-- While this might make is seem less "forgiving", Visual Studio does relatively thorough syntax and type checking on-the-fly, so you don't have to wait until build/run to find your errors.

-- Curly braces and semicolons make blocks of code unambiguous. JS has this as well, but this is in contrast with Python.

- The tools are sophisticated, mature, and free. Visual Studio community edition contains most of the development/debugging tools found in Pro/Enterprise.

- Both the applications you produce, and the IDE itself are cross-platform.

- Unity Engine uses C# as the scripting language, if you ever want to muck around in that space

- NuGet.org contains libraries for almost anything you could ever want to add in, and the package manager is built right in to the IDE.

- Syntactically very similar to C++

 

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