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ash_XP

Fix regular pc problems website

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hi all,

 

I just recently graduated my IT degree end of last year and am starting to apply for basic pc builder/technician jobs atm, but as I have been at uni the last 4 years ive sort of fallen out of the loop with fixing pcs a bit. I only fixed the odd box at uni so im feeling a bit rough with everything. can anyone point me in the direction of a good website that sort of lumps lots of "the usual" jobs a basic computer shop tech has to fix.

 

imalso trying to do some practical based study, like for e.g. i really wanted to find a tutorial or guide on how to fix a master boot record which is easy......, however i cant seem to find anywhere that tells me how to break the master boot record so that i can attempt to fix the damn thing!!!. I was plannin on installing vista and xp on some virtual machines and trying to replicate problems and the go abouts of fixing them.

 

thanks for any help you can offer :)

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You spent four years doing an IT degree, and the highest your aiming at is basic desktop tech stuff?

 

:/

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lol yeah i know it sounds a little low for my qualifications, that being said i have 2 cert III's in IT as well, but the problem is mostly with the area Im located in there arnt that many positions for a graduate level IT person. Mostly only positions opening to ppl with like 5 years expierience with senior level IT exp in the workplace and such.

 

ive started ringing aroud places just recently, as there arnt many jobs advertised on seek and job search web sites where im living atm.

 

so any pointers people?

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you seem to have no issues with study, in the case, 2 short courses worth doing:

 

A+ and N+, basically network and hardware basics, back in the day every tech USED to require them (not any more) but it'll teach you all you need to know hardware wise for basic tech jobs.

 

As for software stuff, its hard to 'study' software issues, its one of those 'learn as they come up' things. which is why its often hard to find a good tech if they're not truly INTO pc's

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+1 to what MS said. Ive been around computers since I was almost a baby. I can honestly say that there are things I still dont know about computers, as far as troubleshooting is concerned. Like MS said, most of the information that the true tech would know has been gathered from experience. That pretty much the only way your going to learn. For the most part, troubleshooting is exactly that. There only so many ways that things might go wrong. From there, eliminate the variables one by one and go from there. If however, you cant get an answer, then youve come up with something that someone else can help you with and learn from. Thats all I can say about that.

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I remember reading one of the those "fix your own pc" type books, and one of them had this whopping big flow-chart at the back which incorporated most major PC components into a troubleshooting regime. it was pretty comprehensive, and linked back tot he various section at the front explaining what the parts were, and how to identify them.

 

Would be a great project to build an online version.

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He has to start somewhere and gaining some real world experience helps. Depending on the degree the skills obtained might come in later in his career. Do yourself a favor and get some industry certs, MS, Linux, Citrix are good places to start.

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There's nothing like learning on the job but then you need a job to get the experience.

I've been fiddling around with computers at work and home for over 20 years.

Edited by Jeruselem

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Learning what to say and what not to say is also a good thing. For example, in a business environment and there is a printer problem you can't solve. The phrase "Just install Linux" does not float ;)

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Learning what to say and what not to say is also a good thing. For example, in a business environment and there is a printer problem you can't solve. The phrase "Just install Linux" does not float ;)

 

lol, most ppl would say "install wat?"

 

i was looking into some certifications actually cause i think with an IT degree these days we come out not knowning enough about real world setups, i was actually talking to my old linux admin lecturer about this exact topic at the end of the course. He was telling me about how ITgrads will think they are educated enough to do most jobs when they graduate but when applying for jobs and reading the "expectations/qualifications/knowledge in" they relise they dont know much if anything about what is on that list. Also practical experience is lacking alot in graduates i have found.

 

The thing that is annoying is that no one informs the students of these things, and thus after graduating with a degree (to which is meant to have thousands of spots to fill in a growing market) in this field we stumble to find that there are not that many entry level jobs for graduates available unless u live in a captial city somewhere in australia. At least this has been mine and few other ppl in my classes expierience with our field. feel free to add constructive criticism :)

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i was actually talking to my old linux admin lecturer about this exact topic at the end of the course. He was telling me about how ITgrads will think they are educated enough to do most jobs when they graduate but when applying for jobs and reading the "expectations/qualifications/knowledge in" they realise they dont know much if anything about what is on that list. Also practical experience is lacking alot in graduates i have found.

i take it you are one such person. what specifically have you read in a job description that you dont know much about?

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i was actually talking to my old linux admin lecturer about this exact topic at the end of the course. He was telling me about how ITgrads will think they are educated enough to do most jobs when they graduate but when applying for jobs and reading the "expectations/qualifications/knowledge in" they realise they dont know much if anything about what is on that list. Also practical experience is lacking alot in graduates i have found.

i take it you are one such person. what specifically have you read in a job description that you dont know much about?

 

oh its just as an example, some jobs i have looked at located in my area have requirements for expierience in novel and microsoft exchange seem to come up often. just alot of stuff like that which we were never taught about at uni. That being said however im sure on the job training is provided to some level but they do expect that the applicant has some experience with using these things. which i guess is more reason to try and find copies of the software and read more about these things in online training manuals as the likes.

Edited by ash_XP

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