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nesquick back the truck up, this guy knows what he is talking about, obviously.

 

He got the op machine to run at 4ghz, end of story.

 

And dont talk about pride dude, when you got buckets of it coming out of your own posts.

 

Show respect for others and they will do the same for you.

 

Peace.

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nesquick back the truck up, this guy knows what he is talking about, obviously.

 

He got the op machine to run at 4ghz, end of story.

 

And don't talk about pride dude, when you got buckets of it coming out of your own posts.

 

Show respect for others and they will do the same for you.

 

Peace.

True he got it running but anyone could say run a shit load of vcore through it and it will post, I am more concerned with telling someone something and then it dies on them because of what I told them, as for the respect or whatever I show it to those that support what they are trying to say with hard evidence and not just a statement of their personal opinion.

 

As a side note for only 4.0ghz 1.45v is excessively high, take for example my e8600 which only needed stock 1.25vcore to get to 4.0ghz and 1.4v to sit at 4.5ghz so you cant blame me for getting insulted that some random has said I am basically an idiot without any idea of what machines I have owned and overclocked ect, for all we know he could be one of those front desk monkeys that every computer shop has that are from my experience always rude know it alls and what he said about running 1.45v @4ghz on the stock wolfdale cooler IMO is just complete BS anyone who has seen one would know what I am talking about.

 

*end of rant and leaving thread*

Edited by nesquick

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Voltage does kill and so does heat.

 

No matter which way you spin it, if you pump alot of voltage through something itll die quicker then a chip that doesnt. Sure lots of overclockers run shit load of voltage through there chips, but they also go through alot.

 

Some chips like one of Dinos AFAIK lasted 3-4 bench runs.

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..... *end of rant and leaving thread*

I didn't have to guess at your experience as you posted it straight off. You had experience with 1 E8600 and got the rest of your info from various articles/forum posts. I don't consider your experience comparable to mine, especially with this particular CPU and motherboard, but you're free to disagree.

 

I've been a member of this forum for several years (I believe I started on the old Atomic forum in '03 or so). My SN hasn't changed and my posts are still in the archives. I only post on the topics that I'm interested in and can contribute to (mainly CPU, memory, overclocking). I've also been in the top 10 of overclockers here most of the time since then for CPUs and memory (all on air cooling). So it's not exactly like I'm some Johnny Come Lately to AtomicMPC. Those who know me are aware that I own a computer shop in Adelaide. We've had it here since '02, and I ran it in the USA for 10 years before that. I deal directly with Intel suppliers every few days or so, and they're also well aware of what I do to their CPUs.

 

And no, I don't spend my entire day sitting behind a desk. Usually I take a joy ride on my BMW at some point, and I like to pick up components from our suppliers when possible. I also do the bulk of our builds myself, because I like doing it. I'm on 24/7 phone support (which rarely rings), but usually only work a few days per week anymore. I have a bit of insomnia, which allows me to read more about my business/interests than the average person.

 

The only Intel CPUs that we've ever killed were Pent D (805D), 2 of them (on our own systems and 1 ((3 total)) is still running almost 4 years later), and both of those ran for 2 and 3 years at 4.0GHz (1.5v). Well worth it for us at the time to get 2, 3 and 4 years at that speed from a $100 2.66GHz dual core. I made our results public (on our website) and invited users from many forums to look at our results, but never recommended anyone else try it. That situation was extreme. This one is not.

 

I mentioned that I've built hundreds of systems with the E8400, stressed tested them all, and never yet (knock on wood) seen one fail at 1.45v during the stress test or after the customer received the system. Since you can't refute my info, you question my credibility. I no longer care to post our website publicly as I have nothing to prove to you or anyone else on this forum. We only service the immediate area and have more than enough business now. Plus, we run the risk of trolls trashing our reputation based on a post they don't like (not that you'd do such a thing, but I've seen it done before). I'd much rather let our paying customers do the talking. So if you choose to believe I'm full of it, I'm quite happy for you to think so.

 

I've also seen many members, of this particular forum and a few other enthusiast forums (PCStats, Tom's Hardware, AnandTech, Whirlpool.. to name a few), who have overclocked the heck out of these chips and pumped the volts to them. I've seen a single post where someone said they've killed one, but I could have missed it if their were others, and if so it/they would definitely be the the exception to the rule. So if you want to see how many others run 1.45v or more to these chips without problems, just do a search. All of those forums have many users doing it.

 

No one is advocating pumping high voltage to a CPU. The problem lies in where some of us define "high" voltage. What I told the OP was to start at 1.45v and work backwards until he finds the minimum for stability. From my experience with these CPUs, it could be anywhere from 1.375 to 1.425v for 4.0GHz. They vary that much. Most will overclock to 3.6 or 3.8GHz on stock voltage, but will require more to do 4.0GHz and above and remain stable. I don't consider 1.45v high voltage for the E8400 with aftermarket cooling just to get it started, and it's a helluva lot easier to start there and work backwards than start stock and work up 1 notch at a time. BSODs can corrupt your OS (especially on RAID 0) and should be avoided if possible. I'm not advocating anyone run an E8400 at 1.45v every day, but I wouldn't hesitate to do so on mine.

 

Again, anyone concerned about a CPU dying early shouldn't be attempting to overclock, period. Those willing to gamble can achieve much faster speeds than stock (25% or more isn't uncommon), and theoretically get more done in less time than a stock system. Your CPU may last for 4 years or 10 years. All Intel is concerned about is making it through the 3 year warranty. My own system will be upgraded around that time anyway.

 

I hope my customers' systems last closer to 10 years. From what we've seen so far, we have no reason to think they won't.

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Its funny your all talking about voltage, with this overclock:

 

http://valid.canardpc.com/show_oc.php?id=449069

 

I used 1.60Vcore with a Thermalright Ultra 120 extreme to get my E8400 to 4.7ghz!

 

My E8400 is one of those that really eat up voltage, after 3.6ghz i really have to give it some more juice. But grats to the OP, well done on your 4ghz home run, next step is to get it higher and just keep going, feel the rush ;)!

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I came in here a bit late, but jamesski it helps if you use a little more descriptive thread title.

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I came in here a bit late, but jamesski it helps if you use a little more descriptive thread title.

its alright maxxy i <3 you still ;)

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